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the flat fondant "disk" on cupcakes

post #1 of 30
Thread Starter 
Well, it's summer and my family has several birthdays coming up, so I always start browsing Cake Central for ideas. The only time of the year I get to bake a lot!

I like that look of a fondant circle on top of an iced cupcake. It looks like a disk on top. I tried to do it last summer but it looked greasy and not pretty at all.

How thick should the marshmallow fondant be when I roll it?

How long to let it sit before putting it on the cupcake?

And I guess I needed a crusting buttercream icing instead of an all butter buttercream. I used the buttercream recipe that's on the powdered sugar box. Bad idea!

Any other tips? Thanks!
Example isn't another way to teach, it is the only way to teach.--Albert Einstein

My home is in Heaven. I'm just traveling through this world. --Billy Graham
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Example isn't another way to teach, it is the only way to teach.--Albert Einstein

My home is in Heaven. I'm just traveling through this world. --Billy Graham
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post #2 of 30
When I put fondant on cupcakes, it's about 1/4" thick, or thinner. If the cake is dark and the fondant is light colored, it may need to be a little thicker. Fill the cupcakes if you're going to (use tip 12 and just poke a hole in the top of the cupcake and squeeze the frosting in), then put a little smear of buttercream on top and put the fondant on.

I use Indydebi's buttercream http://cakecentral.com/recipes/6992/indydebis-crisco-based-buttercream-icing
post #3 of 30
I make the discs a day or two before decorating. I add some CMC/Tylose to my fondant to make it harden a bit more. I roll out to the thickness I want and cut out circles with a cookie cutter. Leave to dry till you need them. They shouldn't soften too much with the frosting but it will depend on the type of frosting and the temperature.
post #4 of 30
Dayti - I'm assuming that by adding Tylose to make them hard that they are not meant to be eaten with the cake.

I've added Fondant to the tops of cookies. We just tested it and decided to go with RI, so the fondant hadn't hardened yet. So if the fondant was hard, then they would peel it off before they ate the cake.

Kelrak - I don't understand how fondant can look greasy. With the exception of the Crisco that you use on your hands, there is no grease in a fondant. At least not the Wilton one or MMF that I have made. I haven't used any other brand. What kind did you use? Do you know how old it was? Did you use Crisco or something like that on the fondant?
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post #5 of 30
The CMC makes the fondant harden a bit more, so the disk doesn't sag on top of the buttercream. But it doesn't get rock hard in a day or so, so you don't have to take it off the cupcake before eating. I guess you could leave the CMC out if you were making the disks a good few days ahead but I am not that organised.
This is what it can look like:
Image
post #6 of 30
Oh Dayti - So pretty! And talk about a duh! moment - For some reason I thought they completely covered the top of the cupcake. I didn't envision the cute little decoration like you have here. Now I can see why you add the powder.

Someday I am going to try fondant on cupcakes. For right now I am still pretty much just experimenting.
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post #7 of 30
Thankyou! My buttercream was a bit thin that day though icon_rolleyes.gif
I think that those disks are what the OP is talking about, rather than covering the cupcake with fondant after icing with a little buttercream/ganache, but I might be wrong icon_biggrin.gif
post #8 of 30
No, you are probably right. We'll see what she says.

Kelrak - can you give us more details and maybe a link to a photo of what you are talking about?
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post #9 of 30
Thread Starter 
Thanks, everyone. Those are beautiful, Dayti. That's kind of what I have in mind. I've seen flat disks of fondant on top, and soft fondant covering the whole top. I like both looks, but wanted to try the flat disk decoration.

I don't know if my local michaels has CMC or Tylose. I'll have to try the several days in advance method I think.

the cupcake picture from last year is in my photos--it's the pink one with a pink candle.

I think I did use crisco when I was rolling it out, but it was a year ago so the memory is fuzzy. I had read that some people grease their work surface and some use corn starch or PS. I will skip the grease and try a crusting BC like IndyDebi's.
Example isn't another way to teach, it is the only way to teach.--Albert Einstein

My home is in Heaven. I'm just traveling through this world. --Billy Graham
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Example isn't another way to teach, it is the only way to teach.--Albert Einstein

My home is in Heaven. I'm just traveling through this world. --Billy Graham
Reply
post #10 of 30
All-butter buttercream does crust. It works fine under fondant. (And IMO it tastes a lot better than shortening-based BC.) So that's not the issue. If your earlier attempt looked greasy I would guess it's because you used shortening when you were rolling out your fondant, and ended up with too much shortening still on the finished pieces. Shortening on all involved surfaces is essential when kneading fondant, for making it, coloring it or the beginning stages of modeling with it, to keep it soft enough to work with. But when you go to roll it out flat, you want to knead the shortening into it and use powdered sugar to keep it from sticking to the mat -- it works much better than greasing the mat IME. Excess PS at the end can be removed with a pastry brush (dry or damp).

I've never yet tried adding Tylose or gumpaste or whatever to fondant, and for little disks like you're talking about it should be fine to just let your fondant dry for several days. But if you want to try it, Michael's does sell Wilton's Gum-Tex (comes in a little canister) which I understand is functionally the same thing. Either way, the disks will still be edible. But if you've used the gumpaste/Gum-Tex they'll be...crunchier. icon_smile.gif
post #11 of 30
Thread Starter 
Thanks again for the great tips. These are very helpful.

Presidential portrait in cupcakes....

http://www.seriouseats.com/2008/11/photo-of-the-day-president-barack-obama-in-12.html

This was the first picture I ever saw of the fondant disks on cupcakes and I was curious how it was done. Now I see them in lots of posts here and on cupcake wars. Now I think I will try some for my own birthday cupcakes.
Example isn't another way to teach, it is the only way to teach.--Albert Einstein

My home is in Heaven. I'm just traveling through this world. --Billy Graham
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Example isn't another way to teach, it is the only way to teach.--Albert Einstein

My home is in Heaven. I'm just traveling through this world. --Billy Graham
Reply
post #12 of 30
I have some in my photos if you wanna take a look...I did a few practice ones and then they are fondant covered under my hippos and lions ones. They are more recent, so easy to find.

I just took a large round tip and piped a round flat "plop" of buttercream...then I took a round cookie cutter in the same size as the top of the cupcake....cut out the fondant...and gently smoothed it onto the top of the cupcake. It was about 1/4" thick or slightly less. (The pattern was rolled in using an impression mat before cutting into circles). It was actually alot easier than I thought, as I hadn't done it before.
post #13 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by LindaF144

Dayti - I'm assuming that by adding Tylose to make them hard that they are not meant to be eaten with the cake.

I've added Fondant to the tops of cookies. We just tested it and decided to go with RI, so the fondant hadn't hardened yet. So if the fondant was hard, then they would peel it off before they ate the cake.




When you put fondant on cookies, cut the shapes before you bake the cookies, then put the fondant on when the cookie is hot out if the oven. I loosen the cookies from the baking sheet and then put the fondant on right away, before I take them off the sheet. The heat will melt the underside of the fondant just enough to bond it to the cookie. When the edges start to look a tiny bit shiny, move the cookies to a cooling grid and don't touch the fondant until it hardens a little bit. It will get firm enough to stack within about an hour, and the fondant will stay soft enough to bite through easily with the cookie. I usually flavor the fondant with Lorann's butter rum and then use Lorann's buttery sweet dough emulsion in the dough, and I always get rave reviews on that combination.
post #14 of 30
I haven't used fondant on cupcakes before, but will try it. I have, however, used round candy molds (2") with white chocolate-based decorations, and it looks great. There is never a question of whether or not they eat the topper! icon_smile.gif
post #15 of 30
Thread Starter 
Yeah, I thought about that. I've done a little chocolate on cakes before. I'm not a fan of the taste of the candy melts, but my son likes them so they may end up on his cake. He has big ideas about me trying to do Super Mario Galaxy. Yikes!

Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeRx

I haven't used fondant on cupcakes before, but will try it. I have, however, used round candy molds (2") with white chocolate-based decorations, and it looks great. There is never a question of whether or not they eat the topper! icon_smile.gif
Example isn't another way to teach, it is the only way to teach.--Albert Einstein

My home is in Heaven. I'm just traveling through this world. --Billy Graham
Reply
Example isn't another way to teach, it is the only way to teach.--Albert Einstein

My home is in Heaven. I'm just traveling through this world. --Billy Graham
Reply
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