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Fondant and Buttercream bulges/air bubbles - Page 3

post #31 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by amysue99

So is it the cornstarch? Or is my fondant getting air bubbles because there are air bubbles forming under the buttercream, therefore distorting the fondant?



I roll my fondant out between vinyl and so I do not have to use ps or cornstarch. Maybe you could try that.
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post #32 of 59
Okay, I made three fondant-covered cakes in the last month that I never once put in the fridge (used non-perishable fillings) and not one bubble - everything was great. I put my son's fondant-covered cake in and out of the fridge as I was working on it and put it back in the fridge until two hours before the party. As it came to room temperature, a bubble formed under the fonant and cracked the fondant. Ahhh, thank God it wasn't for a customer! I used powdered sugar, not cornstarch when covered all of the cakes with fondant. Sooo.. it seems to me that the issue is refrigeration and I will not be refrigerating my fondant-covered cakes any more.
post #33 of 59
Please help with this one.....I use a buttercream icing, I use Land O Lakes butter(salted), Wal-mart shortening, Wilton vanilla flavoring and Wilton butter flavoring and a little water. I make my own MM fondant, which I use 2 - 10oz bags of JetPuffed MM, 1 bag of powder sugar and 2 TB of water and a capful of Wilton Butter flavoring...when I cover my cakes, something happens under the fondant and it looks like water or something is melting and coming out at the bottom of the fondant. Then it will form a big bubble. This will happen in just one area, the rest of my cake fills firm and the fondant is sticking good, although the liquid is coming out all around the whole cake, but the one area where the bubble is is mushy. PLEASE tell me what is happening!! I posted about this earlier and I was using Counry Crock margarine, I was told that the margarine had water in it and it was breaking down and melting the back of the fondant, well, I switched to butter and it is still doing it. I do use cornstarch, I am going to try just powdered sugar today.
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post #34 of 59
what do you mean when you say you sue corn starch? To roll out the fondant? I use shortening on my counter when I roll out fondant. You can also mix a 50/50 blend of cornstarch and powdered sugar. That is what they teach at Wilton.

And in case others ask, how do you prepare your cake each step of the way. Is there any time that is in the fridge and out?
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post #35 of 59
Since the transfats have been taken out of shortening I have had this problem no matter what recipe I use. I think the pools of clear liquid is shortening. Very frustrating. It almost makes me not want to decorate cakes. Almost.
post #36 of 59
If that is the case then definitely get some Dream Whip and add it to the frosting. Dream Whip contains hydrogenated transfat, so you will be adding it back into your frosting and then the problem should be gone.

Although SMBC is used under fondant all the time and that has no transfat. But SMBC has no shortening, so it could be vegetable fat vs. animal fat. I don't know, just speculating. In any case, add the transfat back in with Dream Whip and the problem should go away.
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post #37 of 59
Do you add 1 packet of dreamwhip to each batch of icing?
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post #38 of 59
Indydeb's recipe uses about 3 tablespoons which I think is about a half of a package. If you srsrchbthe recipes section for indydeb's recipe it will have the exact amount posted there. I would post a link, but it is too long of a process from my iPad.
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post #39 of 59
Okay, I have another idea about this... yesterday I made my mother-in-law a buttercream cake and I used crusting buttercream (as I always do). Just before she served the cake, I noticed an air bubble under the buttercream. I remember adding more buttercream to that area because the cake was almost showing through (I probably added more AFTER it had crusted). Could the crusting buttercream be the problem??? Maybe fondant has trouble sticking to it (even though I usually wipe it with a wet paper towel first before covering in fondant). I'm going to start using the crusting buttercream's only as filling and try using non-crusting buttercream to ice my cake and to use under fondant. What do you guys think? I'll let you know how it goes. As you can see, I'm desparate to figure this out! So you guys that have had blow-outs, are you using a crusted buttercream? If you're not, that blows my latest theory right out the window, lol!
Also.. lately I'm having trouble getting a crusted buttercream smooth on my cake anyway - it dries too fast then my spatula starts pulling at the icing and leaving marks. I'd like to try and start using non-crusted buttercream for that reason too.
post #40 of 59
I had some pretty good size bulges and air bubbles in a few of my cakes. I always used the same method and sometimes Id get them and sometimes I wouldnt. Very frustrating because I dont know what to do different to prevent it. EXCEPT, the last 5 or 6 fondant covered cakes Ive done, I used ganache under my fondant. You can be assured, no bulges, no air bubbles, nothing. You get very sharp edges and nice flat, bulge free sides.

I really want to use buttercream again because ganache is more expensive and well, I just want to be able to use buttercream! But now Im scared to try it again since I get such amazing results using ganache.

I will say Im guilty of chilling my cakes. They go in and out of the fridge as Im decorating. Its just so much easier to decorate a chilled, firm cake.
post #41 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaylani

Has anyone compared the side bulge to the cake flavor/recipe? I am so annoyed with it that I have been driving everyone around me crazy. icon_surprised.gif

The icing dam is always the same, but now I am wondering if the cake density is part of it. I am going to start tracking that with the size of the bulge. My idea is that the weight of the fondant pulls down more on some cake flavors than others which pushes the buttercream out further.

Or....I may have been worrying about this so much that I am confusing myself icon_confused.gif LOL! I want perfect fondant covered cakes & these bulges are in the way.



I do think this is true. If the cake is very soft, then I will get those tiny bulges along the dam line, even though the dam is super stiff. The cake is compressing under the fondant, not the filling, and the crumcoat collects along the dam line.

Lemon, berry, yeallow... seem to be the culprits for me. That is whay I use ganache over soft cakes now.

Sharon Zambito

SugarEd Productions Online Sugar Art School 
www.sugaredproductions.com

 

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Sharon Zambito

SugarEd Productions Online Sugar Art School 
www.sugaredproductions.com

 

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post #42 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Sugar_Fairy

Okay, I have another idea about this... yesterday I made my mother-in-law a buttercream cake and I used crusting buttercream (as I always do). Just before she served the cake, I noticed an air bubble under the buttercream. I remember adding more buttercream to that area because the cake was almost showing through (I probably added more AFTER it had crusted). Could the crusting buttercream be the problem??? Maybe fondant has trouble sticking to it (even though I usually wipe it with a wet paper towel first before covering in fondant). I'm going to start using the crusting buttercream's only as filling and try using non-crusting buttercream to ice my cake and to use under fondant. What do you guys think? I'll let you know how it goes. As you can see, I'm desparate to figure this out! So you guys that have had blow-outs, are you using a crusted buttercream? If you're not, that blows my latest theory right out the window, lol!
Also.. lately I'm having trouble getting a crusted buttercream smooth on my cake anyway - it dries too fast then my spatula starts pulling at the icing and leaving marks. I'd like to try and start using non-crusted buttercream for that reason too.


I've thought the very same thing, that the buttercream crusts too fast for the fondant to adhere properly so I've started misting my cakes lightly with water before covering in fondant, seems to help.
I also have a insulin needle that I poke all around the fondant then smooth again with fondant smoothers.
post #43 of 59
I made a 6" yellow cake (denser cake ~pound cake) with vanilla BC. I covered it with Satin ICE and did NOT refrigerate. Noticed a huge bubble a few hours layer. So, for me at least, refrigeration wasn't the problem.
post #44 of 59

Still trying to figure this out, I get this so very often and it drives me nuts... NUTS!!! I think this definitely has something to do with the temperature. So frustrated with trying to figure this out..seriously!

post #45 of 59

If you get air bubbles I have the BEST solution. After kneading your fondant, and you place it on the cornstarch wherever you roll it. Flip the piece over and poke holes with a fabric needle. Poke holes ALL over the bottom, then flip it back over and roll it out. Ever since I've been poking holes in my fondant, I haven't had a SINGLE air bubble. I think it gets out any potential air bubbles before they form. Good luck!

 

Marissa :)

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