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Fondant and Buttercream bulges/air bubbles - Page 2

post #16 of 59
That I *know* of I've only had one severe bubble but it was at an event I attended, so I suppose its possible I have had another few and then customers did not inform me...but I hope not!

The bubble that I had appeared several hours after I set it up, which meant it was as it came to room temp.

When I cut it, I saw that the frosting had separated from the cake...so the air bubble was between the cake and the frosting, NOT between the fondant and the frosting. I think maybe it must somehow come from between the layers.

I also do alot of refrigeration. I think the refrigeration helps keep from getting the middle "bulge" because if everything is firmed up all the way through the cake before adding fondant, then the pressure you are using to smooth the fondant will not cause the cake to settle and bulge the frosting out the sides.

As far as the bubbles...its scary! But I just try to make sure I am not leaving gaps when I spread my buttercream...and also alot of times I use wire/stars and whatever, and I bet on those cakes, or any cake you actually stick something in, helps avoid bubbles. Not sure the answer though...really....
post #17 of 59
Okay....this is a topic that is of great interest to me on an ongoing basis, and as I read through things, and think about what I do, I am NOT one who refigerates. Ever. Never have. And I stll have bulges....yes, I believe that humidity is huge factor, and my bubbles/ bulges have usually happened during warmer weather. I crumb coat, I let cakes settle and rest overnight, I have a very stiff dam of icing between layers, cakes are iced and decorated in a cool enviornment, and bubbles/bulges still occur, and always on layered cakes, never sheet cakes. Sometimes they occur within hours, sometimes it's happened overnight, and the funny thing is if I take off the icing and re-ice the cake, I don't get a bulge. That's interesting to me. My next thought is that it might be my icing recipe (yes, I use hi-ratio shortening, no butter, meringue powder, corn syrup, water, flavoring, and of course powdered sugar and a little salt). Perhaps this bubble/bulge thing will always be an ongoing dilemma/mystery! I don't always get a bubble or bulge, but when I do, it's certainly frustrating because I always use the same processes. Hmmmm...
post #18 of 59
Sometimes I think maybe when you take a big chunk of icing and start spreading it over the cake, that there can be a small gap that is air trapped between the cake and icing.

I think maybe if we make sure we are firmly filling the cake and pressing out any air...and then firmly icing the cake with a nice thin crumb coat...and then icing again firmly, making sure no air is being trapped, maybe our chances will be less?

I know that the cake I did that got the air bubble...since it was a freebie I brought to a party, I actually did not let it rest a long time between crumb coating...actually I don't even know if I did crumb coat at all, I think I just iced it...chilled for awhile, and then fondant. So since I combined steps I'm wondering if going faster allowed air to get trapped more easily.
post #19 of 59
That makes sense...the firmness part....firmly filling, then pressing out air, and firmly icing in smaller amounts. I do sometimes get a large glob, and perhaps I don't press in enough. And, a really light crumb coat. I am guilty of slathering that on sometimes. That all really makes sense to me...thanks Kitagirl! icon_biggrin.gif

Now, for that humidity thing..... icon_surprised.gif
post #20 of 59
Has anyone compared the side bulge to the cake flavor/recipe? I am so annoyed with it that I have been driving everyone around me crazy. icon_surprised.gif

The icing dam is always the same, but now I am wondering if the cake density is part of it. I am going to start tracking that with the size of the bulge. My idea is that the weight of the fondant pulls down more on some cake flavors than others which pushes the buttercream out further.

Or....I may have been worrying about this so much that I am confusing myself icon_confused.gif LOL! I want perfect fondant covered cakes & these bulges are in the way.
post #21 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by amysue99

So is it the cornstarch? Or is my fondant getting air bubbles because there are air bubbles forming under the buttercream, therefore distorting the fondant?



I always use cornstarch to roll out my fondant and I have read that Sharon (sugarshack) does as well...so I don't think that the cornstarch is your problem......I really, really don't.
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post #22 of 59
Cake flavor doesn't seem to by my problem....it happens on chocolate, white, lemon, whatever. I do however, have a problem with choclate cakes sinking in the middle when I do sheet cakes, or if I do a 1/2 white 1/2 chocolate, the chocolate rising not as high as the white side, even when batter levels are the same. My chocolate also sinks when I do rounds as well. I have figured out to fill chooclate a little bit higher, and bake a little longer, and that seems to help. But the chocolate always sinks, no other flavor.
post #23 of 59
Oh yeah, and I try to not open the oven door to "check" the cake...just let it bake through the full time. That helps the cakes to not sink.
post #24 of 59
Last fall I was working on a 4 tier wedding cake on my kitchen counter. It was October so the weather was fine. I have a three light fixture hanging above my counter. All buttercream. Well as I was working on the cake I noticed a huge bubble start to form on one edge of the top tier! Guess what? The cake was so tall it was too close to one of the lights and the heat was causing the bubble to grow! As soon as I moved the cake away from those lights I didn't have anymore problems. It was a crisco/butter BC recipe. So my guess is that the bubbles that grow have nothing to do with fondant and are some kind of reaction with different temperatures between inside and outside of cake? Similar to what Kitagrl experienced. Perhaps the way the cakes are being stored they are in direct line of spotlighting? I can see this happening at a wedding.

Just a thought.
post #25 of 59
Thread Starter 
mamawrobin - I sure hope not. cornstarch is the only way I can keep my fondant from sticking.

Mel1965 - mine sink too. I increased the flour by a bit and decreased the liquid by a bit and that seemed to help. And I absolutly cannot touch it to check for doneness or that completely deflates it.
post #26 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mel1965

Cake flavor doesn't seem to by my problem....it happens on chocolate, white, lemon, whatever. I do however, have a problem with choclate cakes sinking in the middle when I do sheet cakes, or if I do a 1/2 white 1/2 chocolate, the chocolate rising not as high as the white side, even when batter levels are the same. My chocolate also sinks when I do rounds as well. I have figured out to fill chooclate a little bit higher, and bake a little longer, and that seems to help. But the chocolate always sinks, no other flavor.



I have the exact opposite problem! This is so weird! I use a mix, Pillsbury, and it ALWAYS rises WAY up! Sometimes it will run over the side and drip to the bottom. Do you use a mix or scratch? What brand if it is a mix? I don't fill it very full, and it is always very dense and doesn't sink. I have sinking issues with white and yellow. lol!
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post #27 of 59
sorry what do you mean by flas freezing? do you crumb coat it then ice it the flash freeze before covering with fondant?do you guys fondant it when its nearly forozen is it ?

how long would you call a flash freeze? 1/2 hour?????
post #28 of 59
non- that's what I was thinking too! I only get the bubbles when my cake goes from a cooler environment to a warmer one!
post #29 of 59
I usually use Duncan Hines, but I mad a choc cake for my son's birthday this week and used a Betty Crocker super moist, and it did not sink. Didn't seem to have as much batter as DH, but didn't sink, so we were good. Everyone liked it better, too, so I may switch over to BC, at least for chocolate. Adding flour and less liquid is a good idea...I'll remember that!
post #30 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by skinnyminx

sorry what do you mean by flas freezing? do you crumb coat it then ice it the flash freeze before covering with fondant?do you guys fondant it when its nearly forozen is it ?

how long would you call a flash freeze? 1/2 hour?????



No..15 minutes tops...you don't want a cold cake just firm. 15 minutes in the freezer won't freeze your cake or change the inside temperature of your cake but it will firm it up good for a nice foundation for fondant. I can get sharper edges when I do it this way.

amysue...I would bet money it isn't the cornstarch...like I said I always use it w/o any problems. So glad that I don't have any either because Michele Foster's works much better when using cornstarch for rolling out. thumbs_up.gif
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