Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Cake Decorating › Fondant and Buttercream bulges/air bubbles
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Fondant and Buttercream bulges/air bubbles

post #1 of 56
Thread Starter 
I know there have been tons of posts about this, but I'm getting frustrated. I am consistently getting air bubbles under my fondant and buttercream and small bulges at the mid-seam. But I'm trying to do everything right! Where am I going wrong? Here is what I'm doing:

1. Cool cakes completely
2. Fill with stiff buttercream dam, about 1/4" filling. Very thin crumbcoat
3. Let rest overnight on counter, weighted for smaller cakes
4. Ice
5. If using fondant, flash freeze (per Sugarshack) and cover.

What is going wrong? Someone please help!!!
post #2 of 56
I wish that I could help but I am completely stumped. icon_confused.gif You use the very same method that I use to avoid those problems...so I just don't know.
I'm anxious to see what some of the others have to say.
everyday is a good day, some are just better than others.
Reply
everyday is a good day, some are just better than others.
Reply
post #3 of 56
Yes, also curious. *watching*
post #4 of 56
Thread Starter 
Hopefully someone will have an answer.
post #5 of 56
The only difference I can see from what I basically do, is that you're crumb coating before the settling process. I fill, let settle, only then do I crumb coat. The whole purpose of settling is for the cake to compress from its own weight, forcing any excess air out. Why put a seal or barrier up that would keep the air and gases from getting out?
Housework makes you ugly.

It's marshmallow, not marshmellow! Aaargh, I have the strangest pet peeves!
Reply
Housework makes you ugly.

It's marshmallow, not marshmellow! Aaargh, I have the strangest pet peeves!
Reply
post #6 of 56
Yup...not stiff enough dam for the buttercream filling. I crumbcoat after filling and rarely have any issues. The only time I have a buldging issue is when I don't let the cake settle long enough (sounds like you are letting them settle long enough) and the only time I have bubbles in the fondant is when I rush the coming to room temp process. The "flash freeze" thing may be why you are getting bubbles. After covering with fondant I try not to ever even have to refridgerate my cake because I will almost always get a bubble as it's coming back to room temp. As for the buldge, all I can think is that your dam is not stiff enough. Oh! When you come back to them after settling are you checking to see if it's overflowing and smooth out the sides again? I usually smooth out my sides, let it crust again, and then do the final coat of buttercream or fondant. One more thing...if you know you routinely get bubbles, watch your cake closely the first two hours after covering (the fondant is firming up during this time) and as the bubble forms just smooth it out before it gets too big...the few I have had I was able to catch when they were about the size of a quarter and just smoothed them right back down. Hope any of this helped!


Cat
post #7 of 56
I read a post (on here actually) that said that if you use cornstarch to roll the fondant (instead of powdered sugar) that there is a yeast agent in there and that makes those air bubbles. I saw on youtube a lady that sprays here butter cream with water to get a tighter bond between her icing and the fondant, that idea seems interesting. I use cornstarch and get bubbles also myself I use the pray for the best method lol!

This week I used virgin ice fondant for the first time (always use satin ice) the difference when I got the air bubble with this fondant is that when I pierced the air pocket and flattened it out the fondant was still pliable and didn't crack at all so the repair was perfect.
post #8 of 56
Thread Starter 
My dam is pretty stiff - almost able to mold it with my hands - and I do clean up any bulging that happens during the settle. I will eliminate the early crumb coat and see if that helps. Also, I usually apply fondant and then begin decorating. I will start giving that firm-up time. I have been able to fix the air bubbles by smoothing them out, but I usually have to remove the bottom border to do so. Thanks for the advice! Hopefully this will help end my problems.
post #9 of 56
What about air bubbles that develop in buttercream even after sitting overnight (or longer)? I've had 2 or 3 cakes recently to develop air bubbles in the buttercream and I'm not sure of the cause.

One was a wedding cake that was filled/dirty iced on a Thursday, frosted and stacked on Friday and decorated on Saturday, the morning of the wedding. No air bubbles to be seen. Later when I viewed the wedding pictures where they cut the cake, a bubble had developed in the top tier on the side. The only cause I could figure was it was an outdoor wedding and the heat index was about 100. I assume the cake heating up caused the air bubble to come out.

The next cake was for a birthday party. Same process as above except the cake was totally decorated and stacked and ready to go the evening before it was due. Again, no air bubbles in sight. After we drove very, very slowly down a very, very bumpy gravel driveway to deliver - one air bubble developed in the side and cracked the buttercream. Fixed that one the best I could and then later (again viewing party pics) saw that another bubble/crack had developed on the front after I left. I assume the bouncing down the gravel driveway caused it.

Used SPS for both cakes, so they were very sturdy. I hope someone can give some insight! These air bubble problems are giving me fits - not sure what to do to fix it!
post #10 of 56
Thread Starter 
Yes, I had that problem as well. Had a bubble develop on the front of a cake (no way to fix or hide) after the car ride. Also used SPS. Cake had been sitting at room temp since the night before. I assumed it was from the heat. Tried to keep the car cool, but some things just can't be controlled.
post #11 of 56
Amysue, I am having similar situations here. Have you changed anything about your process recently? New recipes for your cakes or butter cream? I have been working on this and I think I have it narrowed down to my BC. Just a thought...oh and if you figure it out please let me know. I am just about on the verge of a meltdown with this issue icon_smile.gif
post #12 of 56
Thread Starter 
No, everything is exactly the same. Could it be the weather? It's hot and humid, but the air conditioner is running. The house is usually about 70 degrees.
post #13 of 56
I'm absolutely dying to know why this happens too. My theories on why it happens: (1) refrigerating causes condensation beads (when the cake returns to room temperature) under the buttercream or fondant which causes the bubbles (2) maybe using cornstarch with fondant is the problem because of the chemical reaction. I'm going to try using powered sugar next time. I've heard of someone putting small straws into the fondant covered cake to let the air escape. Hopefully together, we'll all figure this out one day!
post #14 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Sugar_Fairy

...(1) refrigerating causes condensation beads (when the cake returns to room temperature) under the buttercream or fondant...



That's not possible. A cake cannot sweat under frosting.

Science lesson: Cakes do not sweat. Any moisture you see on the outside of a cake, frosted or otherwise, is not moisture coming from the cake...or from the fridge. It is the humidity in the warm air outside of your fridge, condensing on your cold cake when you take it out.

So, the humidity in the air can condense on your frosting or fondant. But it can't travel through frosting to get underneath it on your cake.

Water takes different forms depending on its temperature, from steam/humidity at the warm end, liquid in the middle range to solid/ice at the cold end.

When the humidity (warm/gas) in the air in your room hits the cool of your cake, the temperature changes the gas to a liquid which accumulates on the cool cake surface.

So, the cure for decorated cakes sweating when you take them out of the fridge is to prevent the humid air from getting to your cake. If the cake is in a box when you take it out, the humid/warm/gas cannot reach the cool surface of the cake. It will hit the outside of the cool box and condense there, leaving your cake surface perfectly dry. The cake will be safe as it comes to room temp.

So, if your cake is already frosted or fondanted, the frosting actually acts as a barrier (just like the box does), preventing the humidity from getting to the cake underneath. So, when you take a frosted cake out of the fridge, condensation will only accumulate on the outside surface of the frosting, not, beneath it, between it and the cake.
Housework makes you ugly.

It's marshmallow, not marshmellow! Aaargh, I have the strangest pet peeves!
Reply
Housework makes you ugly.

It's marshmallow, not marshmellow! Aaargh, I have the strangest pet peeves!
Reply
post #15 of 56
Thread Starter 
So is it the cornstarch? Or is my fondant getting air bubbles because there are air bubbles forming under the buttercream, therefore distorting the fondant?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cake Decorating
Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Cake Decorating › Fondant and Buttercream bulges/air bubbles