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What is difference between glycerine and corn syrup?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
I picked up a container of glycerine @ Michaels', and under ingredients, it listed only corn syrup, so I put it back. I figured I would just use corn syrup. However, I see a fondant recipe that calls for BOTH corn syrup and glycerine. Does anyone know if these are the same and interchangeable?
post #2 of 13
Corn syrup is very similar to glucose except corn syrup has a bit more water. Glycerine is different. It aids with stretchability and speed of drying of the fondant. Are you sure what you picked up at Michaels wasn't glusose?
post #3 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by KayMc

I picked up a container of glycerine @ Michaels', and under ingredients, it listed only corn syrup, so I put it back. I figured I would just use corn syrup. However, I see a fondant recipe that calls for BOTH corn syrup and glycerine. Does anyone know if these are the same and interchangeable?



You didn't pick up a container of glycerine if it listed corn syrup as the only ingredient. Glycerine list glycerine ONLY on the ingredient lable. I'd bet everything I have on that icon_wink.gif I imagine that you picked up glucose but I KNOW that it wasn't glycerine that you read the label on. Completely two different things. Absolutely NOT interchangeable.

Glycerine is just glycerine. Glucose is very simliar to corn syrup but much thicker. Go back to Michaels and read the glycerine lable. I guarantee it will say "glycerine" and ONLY glycerine. thumbs_up.gif
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post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 
OK, you guys are probably right. icon_redface.gif I'll check it out tomorrow. But the bottom line is that I need to buy it to make the fondant, right?
post #5 of 13
You could leave it out but I find it really helps with workability. I even add it to my MMF now.
post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by KayMc

OK, you guys are probably right. icon_redface.gif I'll check it out tomorrow. But the bottom line is that I need to buy it to make the fondant, right?



If you're making Michele Foster's Fondant it IS NOT ok to leave it out. It's an essential ingredient. So many times I see people post that a recipe "didn't turn out for them" then when ask some questions you find out that they left something out, added something, etc.

I suggest that you read her recipe all the way thru before you start making it. She says in her instructions that it's very important that the measurements be accurate on a few of the ingredients and glycerine is one of those ingredients.
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post #7 of 13
Wilton's glucose comes in a tube like the piping gel. Their glycerine comes in a 2oz bottle like the flavoring bottles. icon_smile.gif
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post #8 of 13
BTW there is no where in KayMc's post that states that she is making MFF. She might be making a completely different recipe. I have left the glycerine out from my recipe on occasion and it was fine. I just like the way it feels with the glycerine better.
post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 
I plan on buying it this weekend, so I'm prepared to make the fondant. Thanks for all your help.
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by dsilvest

BTW there is no where in KayMc's post that states that she is making MFF. She might be making a completely different recipe. I have left the glycerine out from my recipe on occasion and it was fine. I just like the way it feels with the glycerine better.



She sent me a pm this morning. icon_wink.gif That's how I knew she was making MFF. I wouldn't have Just assumed that she was making MFF if I hadn't already known. icon_smile.gif
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post #11 of 13

I am a professional pastry chef and was picking up some low temp molds at Michaels just yesterday and did the EXACT same thing; picked up a tub of glycerin and as I walked to the cashier with my purchases read the label:" same as the woman above, it was "corn syrup". 

 

I told the cashier I wasn't buying that item as I had enough at home and thought to myself that Wilton is marketing one of their products wrong. Which is strange because Wilton does make a veggie based glycerin. 

 

glycerin.jpg

 

There are two types of glycerin (food grade is not used to make explosives, nor nitroglycerin mind you).

 

The difference is whether it's made w/ corn syrup or vegetable oil. 

 

"

Glycerin

Other names: glycerine

Glycerin for culinary use is a thick, clear, syrupy looking liquid used primarily in sweets to retain moisture and enhance sweetness. It is also used in candy making, such as fondant, to keep the candy from crystallizing.  The ingredient may also be used in royal icing to keep it from getting hard.
 

Food grade glycerin can be either animal or vegetable based and can be used interchangeably, depending on the grade.  The vegetable glycerin is typically made from coconut or palm oil while the animal derived counterpart is made from animal fats.  It is most common to use vegetable glycerin in food preparation.



Read more from GourmetSleuth.com: http://www.gourmetsleuth.com/Dictionary/G/Glycerin-6560.aspx#ixzz2Mmvs4rKN"

post #12 of 13

Cheftrish the Wilton Glycerin only comes in the pictured bottle, it's Glucose that comes in a tub and is made of corn syrup. 

elsewhere.
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elsewhere.
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post #13 of 13
Glycerol, also known as glycerin/glycerine, is an organic compound of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen made from either animal fat/oil or vegetable oil.
 
==
Glucose Syrup is an aqueous solution of several compounds, principally glucose/dextrose [from starch] maltose and maltotriose. 
 
Glucose syrup is produced from wheat, barley, tapioca, potato, rice, cassava, arrowroot, sago and maize starches. In the United States, the glucose syrup called "Corn syrup" is made exclusively from maize. 
 
[Karo website] Corn syrup contains between 15% to 20% dextrose (glucose) and a mixture of various other types of sugar.
 
Products listed as "Glucose syrup" usually contain more than 60% glucose/dextrose  [up to 98%.]
 
* US Corn syrup is a thinner syrup while Glucose syrup is a thick syrup.
 
Basically, corn syrup is a glucose syrup, while glucose syrup can be [but not always] a corn syrup with a higher concentration of glucose/dextrose solids.
 
==
In a sugarpaste/rolled fondant recipe, when both are present 
* GLUCOSE SYRUP or CORN SYRUP - prevents crystallization, and improves the texture. 
* GLYCERINE - retains moisture which prevents excessive hardening.
 
The original "rolled fondant" recipe uses glucose syrup. If corn syrup was used, the amount of liquid was always adjusted. Nowdays, a straight substitution is done ...... 
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