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ISOMALT is finaly CLEAR!

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
OMG!
I have always been intimidated by the process of getting isomalt made properly and clear.
Well, the king of isomalt Dominic Palazzolo is the best.
I took a class last night from Dominic and he was making bottles, shoes, huge diamonds, jewels etc...
He showed us how to properly make isomalt, store the made product, reheat and reuse it forever!
This was the best class I have taken in a long time. He showed up with ovens, induction cook top, and was totally prepared to teach a class without any glitches.
The beer bottle (among other things) was amazing and one of the students got to crack it over his head at the end of the class.
ISOMALT is now easy! and of course bubble free and clear too!
post #2 of 9
Thanks for the info. I was watching cake boss the other night. Buddy was making the ring box cake and I wasn't really feeling the color of that big diamond he made. It was kind of yellowish and I think I remember seeing air bubbles.

Is it a certain kind of isomalt or was it his techniques? I'm very interested in this; I haven't tried anything with isomalt, but I need to make jewels soon.
Don't just do it...Do it just!
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Don't just do it...Do it just!
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post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
No, there is no specific kind but rather how much you decide to cook. Now, you will get a slight and I mean slight lack of clarity but that is the best the product looks.
I remember that episode and never took notice of the yellow. However, that occurs because of two things: he burned it (you have to make sure that you you stainless steel only and no other pots or utensils because they give off colour -English spelling) and the heat source has to be smaller then the pot. Because of inconsistencies of heat the side of the pot will heat up faster and burn the isomalt so if you use heat only under the pot the entire product gets the same heat. Gas stoves too cannot be allowed to go up the side of the pot.
The second thing is that if he made too small of a batch to try and be conservative you will not pull it off. You actually can make and reheat the product hundreds of times but you cannot try and do a specific amount. When it is a small batch at a time you tend to burn/yellow it faster.
Now, here is the bubble trick, once you have poured the melted isomalt into a glass proof measuring cup, place it back in a heated oven/toaster oven is fine too at 350 Deg. The longer you let it stabilize in there, the less bubbles you will have. It could take as much as 10-15 mins. If after that time you see that there are still bubbles or it is not clear then it did not get to the required heat temp and you can throw it back in the pot and bring it up to the right temp. You have to have a good thermometer.

To store the stuff and you can do this for over a year is that you leave it in the measuring cup, wrap the heck out of it with plastic wrap and then put a silica pack on it to keep moisture out. Moisture is the enemy.
So for instance, he told us to never put items on the cake until the last minute because the water in the frostings/fondants will soften the sugar. Also, he told us to take those silica packs and put them in a container with a lid, make sure that they do not come into direct container In any case, put all your sugar work in there, silica packs and the tape the lid to the bottom for a good seal. When you get to where ever then you open it up.
The other thing with sugar is placement. You want to coat anything large like beer bottles etc. with confectioners lacquer to seal it from the moisture of the cake. So whatever length of bottle that will sit in the icing should be coated to protect it from melting into your icings.
Oh, when adding colour, just add it to the top of the cup and slowly stir it in until it is heated enough. Then slowly mix it into the bottom. Again, you are adding a cold product to a hot product and you want to keep it hot enough to flow.
Good luck. It was really easy it just sounds complicated.
post #4 of 9
Wow, those are great tips. I hope he comes here to do a class!
post #5 of 9
Great tips thanks! What is "confectioners lacquer "? Should you coat your isomalt "ice" as well?
post #6 of 9
Thanks for the tips!
post #7 of 9
I'm curious what "confectioners lacquer" is also. Glad to hear the isomalt is so easy! I've been trying to blow sugar bubbles with a melted sugar recipe I found online. I got the bubbles to blow but they desolved into a puddle of sugar by morning. I am using a pump I made myself and an old heat lamp. Cheap start up items for anyone wanting to "try it out" first.
post #8 of 9
Does anyone know if Dominic has made a video on how to make a mold for a diamond? I had never heard of him until a few minutes ago. lol. I just watched his video on bottle making. Hes great! And so easy to follow!
post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by yummy

Thanks for the info. I was watching the other night. Buddy was making the ring box cake and I wasn't really feeling the color of that big diamond he made. It was kind of yellowish and I think I remember seeing air bubbles.

Is it a certain kind of or was it his techniques? I'm very interested in this; I haven't tried anything with , but I need to make jewels soon.



Maybe it was a canary diamond! icon_biggrin.gif

This is my new want to learn technique!
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