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nontoxic markers - Page 2

post #16 of 27
If it's on something that isn't meant to be eaten, and you tell the client it isn't meant to be eaten, and the part that touches the cake that WILL be eaten isn't covered in marker, then anyone who does eat the thing you said shouldn't be eaten is acting at his own risk and that's their problem. Whew!
post #17 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

If it's on something that isn't meant to be eaten, and you tell the client it isn't meant to be eaten, and the part that touches the cake that WILL be eaten isn't covered in marker, then anyone who does eat the thing you said shouldn't be eaten is acting at his own risk and that's their problem. Whew!

well I personally had NO IDEA you could use crayola on sugar decorations... although I don't recommend that my clients eat the gumpaste flowers/decorations I make... I do consider everything I make as technically edible and therefore I will only use edible markers.... gel colors.... I know that there are people that WILL EAT the flowers even when u tell them that it is technically edible but that we do not recommend they eat it....

I have never used anything that just says non toxic because I know that doesn't mean edible... this is all new to me... never knew people used that.... BUT I guess if you are letting your customers know that it is NOT edible and you do not advertise your cakes as being completely edible then I would think it's like using a plastic cake topper in your cake... as long as the client knows I guess it's fine.. but wouldn't it be a bad thing if the colored gumpaste product touched part of the cake... wouldn't that make the cake itself not safe to eat?

kinda confusing to me....
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post #18 of 27
i used crayolas....

its not like your painting the cake in it, a little bit isnt going to affect flavor.. or make anyone sick (unless they are severly allergic to something. in which case they need to warn you anyway) so i dont really have a problem

also, its extremely difficult to find cake supplies here.. edible markers in a supermarket?? lol in my dreams! you guys are so lucky to have so much at your fingertips!
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post #19 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by dalis4joe

...BUT I guess if you are letting your customers know that it is NOT edible and you do not advertise your cakes as being completely edible then I would think it's like using a plastic cake topper in your cake... as long as the client knows I guess it's fine.. but wouldn't it be a bad thing if the colored gumpaste product touched part of the cake... wouldn't that make the cake itself not safe to eat?

kinda confusing to me....



Just make sure the colored parts don't touch the cake, if you're concerned about it.

The chefs at my culinary school used to use eye shadows to color their flowers, since it was harder to find petal dusts in the olden days. I only use petal dusts and edible markers now, but it wouldn't bother me if someone used a little non-toxic marker on gumpaste, and the marker didn't touch the surface of the cake. I personally wouldn't use markers to draw on fondant that would be eaten, though.

If non-toxic markers were dangerous, every kindergartener in the world would be dead from sucking on pens. The amount of ink that would get into your system from eating a gumpaste flower is so small it would be way less than the amount that kids ingest. Also, I'd rather eat a tiny bit of non-toxic marker than the amount of food colorings that go into some candy and icings, if given the choice. Eating a gumpaste rose that's been marked up with markers isn't going to turn your poop blue for two days, which has happened to my kids after eating breakfast cereal.
post #20 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by dalis4joe

Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

If it's on something that isn't meant to be eaten, and you tell the client it isn't meant to be eaten, and the part that touches the cake that WILL be eaten isn't covered in marker, then anyone who does eat the thing you said shouldn't be eaten is acting at his own risk and that's their problem. Whew!

well I personally had NO IDEA you could use crayola on sugar decorations... although I don't recommend that my clients eat the gumpaste flowers/decorations I make... I do consider everything I make as technically edible and therefore I will only use edible markers.... gel colors.... I know that there are people that WILL EAT the flowers even when u tell them that it is technically edible but that we do not recommend they eat it....

I have never used anything that just says non toxic because I know that doesn't mean edible... this is all new to me... never knew people used that.... BUT I guess if you are letting your customers know that it is NOT edible and you do not advertise your cakes as being completely edible then I would think it's like using a plastic cake topper in your cake... as long as the client knows I guess it's fine.. but wouldn't it be a bad thing if the colored gumpaste product touched part of the cake... wouldn't that make the cake itself not safe to eat?

kinda confusing to me....



It's like using chalk on gumpaste flowers. Back before we had the internet, the average hobby cake decorator had no idea petal dust even existed. When I bought the Wilton gumpaste kit back in the day, it even said to grate chalk and use that. It's not a food item, but that's what we had and what we used. Nobody expected people to eat the gumpaste flowers. Nobody expected the gumpaste flowers to be edible, and they're not.

To me it's like saying that we shouldn't use dowels anymore, because someone might think they should eat them...if you tell someone something's not edible and it's something that needs to be removed before serving, then the customer needs to be smart enough to remove it.

Like I said before, if I'm writing on the actual cake, I use a script liner paintbrush and gel color...but the markers are a lot easier on non-edible pieces like gumpaste toppers or flowers.
post #21 of 27
chalk? really? that's something.... I guess when the first person decided to make flowers out of sugar... they had to start with something.... and then came the petal dusts... luster dust, etc

If you are disclosing the information to the customer.... then it's okay

I don't think the dowels can be talked about in the same manner... it's like the cake board... that's about the structural support of the cake....

I now recall reading somewhere about painting flowers with chalk....and I went to Michaels looking for edible chalk hehehehe... the girl looked at me like I was crazy...
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post #22 of 27
Most people would probably be surprised to know that gumpaste flowers have been made since the 1600s. They used to grind real flowers into the paste with a mortar and pestle to get colors.
post #23 of 27
I didn't find mine in the grocery store. I found Wilton's at the craft store, but they suck. I almost had to order the Americolor ones online but I happened to finally run across them at my cake supply store.

It's not that I never use anything that's not technically food safe. It's that I tell people what parts of the cake aren't if I do use something like that. I also leave a disassembly sheet showing where the dowels are and telling them to remove them. If something is edible but won't taste great (Wilton fondant, gumpaste, dry spaghetti) I let them know that, too.

After that, it's out of my hands.

I understand taking chances, I really do. However, to let others think it's 100% okay is not cool, IMO- whether that's by not telling a person who receives the cake or by posting online. You say it politely and then let the person decide for themselves because arguing isn't going to change anyone's mind. Polite debate that gives solid info is one thing, rudeness is quite another.
post #24 of 27
On the subject of chalk, the other day I was watching a program on weird addictions. There was a girl who was addicted to eating.....CHALK. She started in grammar school and is now 26 and eats at least a box a day of both white and colored. She did say she preferred the white to the colored though.

Guess, what? After 14 YEARS of eating it, she's still alive with no ill effects. Go figure.

It's an eating disorder called PICA and is not just limited to chalk.

I just thought I would throw that out there, the amount of chalk on gumpaste flowers is so minute. And one of my teachers actually suggested using non-toxic chalk if we can't find the colors we needed, and for defining, non-toxic water color markers.
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post #25 of 27
Eisskween is right, there's not a huge difference between nontoxic and fda approved other than the money the companies have paid to get approval and/or the arbitrary guidelines the FDA uses to decide what they want to approve or not. They require approval on food packaging and food coloring, but not baby formula or nutritional supplements. Just tell the clients that the gumpaste flowers aren't meant to be eaten.

Here's an interesting link for those who don't want to have a marker touch their gumpaste...Better stop taking vitamins and using makeup, even though those have a history of being safe for human comsumption they don't get an FDA approval http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm047470.htm

Also notice on there that color additives are regulated, but additives with a long history of safe use in foods aren't.
post #26 of 27
Good point costumeczar about the FDA. I take vitamins that I know are not FDA approved. Wouldn't really surprise me if my medicine isn't either.
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post #27 of 27
I was also thinking, on the topic of putting non-edible thigns on cakes, what about fresh flowers? They're covered with pesticides, fertilizers, and all kinds of weird chemicals that florists use to make cut flowers last longer. I don't like using fresh flowers on cakes at all because of that, and I would think that a little bit of marker on a piece of gumpaste would be much less of a concern.
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