Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Cake Decorating › What does it mean to tort a cake?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

What does it mean to tort a cake?  

post #1 of 46
Thread Starter 
I have worked in a bakery, and by no means am I a pro, but I keep seeing the word come up everywhere around here, and I have never heard it before. What is it, and should I be doing it??

Thanks icon_smile.gif
post #2 of 46
Torting is slicing a cake into layers, such as taking a 2" single layer of cake and slicing it into two 1" layers of cake. Here's a simple how to video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mNix3qZ3qnk

It's really pretty when the cake is cut and there are 4 layers of cake and 3 layers of filling, like this one: http://www.flickr.com/photos/55969028@N00/445561652/
post #3 of 46
Thread Starter 
Oh yeah, we did this at the bakery but just called it splitting, lol.

Thanks!
post #4 of 46
Don't want to be seen to be correcting the Forum Matriarch... icon_surprised.gificon_surprised.gificon_surprised.gif

BUT.... a torte is actually the name for the CAKE not the process.

The word "Torte".

A torte is a cake, YES - it is cut into layers and filled - think Sachertorte etc.
Its not how a cake is cut & filled with something that is a technique called "torting" - it really IS cutting & filling & layering - not "to torte a cake"

It's one of those words that seems to have just been used in the wrong sense and run like wildfire - so it becomes so commonplace to hear it used wrongly that you believe it to be true
post #5 of 46
Thread Starter 
Okay--I see people saying I bake the cakes, cool them, tort them, and crumb coat them.

What does it mean in this sense?
post #6 of 46
Another example of the word being used incorrectly LOL

"Okay--I see people saying I bake the cakes, cool them, tort them, and crumb coat them."

In this example the word "tort" has been used to describe the process of slicing a cake into even layers and reassembling it with filling in between - which is what a TORTE .... CAKE .... is icon_biggrin.gif
post #7 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by malakainrop

Don't want to be seen to be correcting the Forum Matriarch... icon_surprised.gificon_surprised.gificon_surprised.gif

BUT.... a torte is actually the name for the CAKE not the process.

The word "Torte".

A torte is a cake, YES - it is cut into layers and filled - think Sachertorte etc.
Its not how a cake is cut & filled with something that is a technique called "torting" - it really IS cutting & filling & layering - not "to torte a cake"

It's one of those words that seems to have just been used in the wrong sense and run like wildfire - so it becomes so commonplace to hear it used wrongly that you believe it to be true




icon_surprised.gificon_confused.gif

In my mid 50's and i learnt how to tort a cake from my GM many moons ago. Don't know anyone here is Australia who doesn't use the term when referring to filling a cake.

Perhaps it is just *new* to you - wherever you are. *shrugs*

Tort and Torte are two different things.

Tort = divide/split
Torte= elaborate sweet cake or tart.

Bluehue.
post #8 of 46
Thread Starter 
Ty! I meant Tort, so I understand what it means now. I have heard of Torte being a tart or something very sweet, but I have never heard of the word Tort.

Thanks!!
post #9 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by selfconclusion12

Ty! I meant Tort, so I understand what it means now. I have heard of Torte being a tart or something very sweet, but I have never heard of the word Tort.

Thanks!!



For a long time i kept seeing the word *layering* on here and i assummed (wrongly or rightly) that the posters meant torting

If that makes sense - lolllllllll

Plus it depends where you are in the world - different terms used in different countries.


Bluehue. icon_smile.gif
post #10 of 46
I see you have got the gist .... and we could all argue the toss about word meaning forever and still not agree -

It's one of the basic terminology TAUGHT (pun intended) at Pastry school

I am happy that I am correct - others who choose to disagree are completely free to do so!!
,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
DEFINITIONS
Noun
1. tort, civil wrong
((law) any wrongdoing for which an action for damages may be brought)

,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,


Noun
1. torte
(rich cake usually covered with cream and fruit or nuts; originated in Austria)
post #11 of 46
Ditto Bluehue, couldn't have said it better myself. thumbs_up.gif
post #12 of 46
But she's right, a tort is a law term and torte is a type of cake. I don't know why people don't want to grasp that, but anyone who wants to misspell and misuse a term is obviously free to do so.
post #13 of 46
Malakainrop, I agree with You too!
post #14 of 46
"Tort" (without the 'e') is a legal term and has nothing to do with cake. "torte" (with an 'e') is a noun, not a verb. BUT, "torte" is commonly used as a verb in the same way that "trash" is. "trash" is a noun, not a verb. But many people use it as a verb..."I'm going to trash this." "he really trashed her."

Of course it's slang. But language is not static. It evolves with the way we choose to use it as a group. As demonstrated by the fact that the OP did not ask, "what dost thou meanest by torting thou torte?"

So, everybody's correctish. (it's a word!)
Housework makes you ugly.

It's marshmallow, not marshmellow! Aaargh, I have the strangest pet peeves!
Housework makes you ugly.

It's marshmallow, not marshmellow! Aaargh, I have the strangest pet peeves!
post #15 of 46
Would this be something like when I say "I Melvira my cakes"? icon_confused.gificon_biggrin.gif
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cake Decorating
This thread is locked  
Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Cake Decorating › What does it mean to tort a cake?