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sometimes i really want to inform clients - Page 5

post #61 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by emrldsky

Ah, but you didn't have a different dessert for you and your husband, did you? icon_wink.gif That was my issue! lol



Absolutely not! We even did the "feeding each other thing" with our cookies. We always marched to the beat of our own drummer, so I think people just went with the flow. Well, of course, many of them had been to the same weddings. Maybe they were glad to have something that tasted good! icon_lol.gif

Kathi
post #62 of 127
kathik, for GOOD PBBlossom cookies, I'd almost forgive no cake. Those babies are delish!
Melvira: Mistress of the dark... chocolate!

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Melvira: Mistress of the dark... chocolate!

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post #63 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy

At one time we had a client who told us that following dinner at her cousin's huge 300 guest wedding the Bridesmaids were stationed at the cake table with a cash box. If guests, wanted cake they had to purchase it. If I remember correctly she said that they charged $2.50 per slice, which, several years ago, shows that they were out to make a nice profit on their cake.



Oy. Whatever happened to proper etiquette?
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If you really put a small value upon yourself, rest assured that the world will not raise your price.
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post #64 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Musings9

Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy

At one time we had a client who told us that following dinner at her cousin's huge 300 guest wedding the Bridesmaids were stationed at the cake table with a cash box. If guests, wanted cake they had to purchase it. If I remember correctly she said that they charged $2.50 per slice, which, several years ago, shows that they were out to make a nice profit on their cake.



Oy. Whatever happened to proper etiquette?



I think it went the same way with "please" and "thank you." Or, my favorite, "You should know I'm turning because I hit my brakes!"

icon_wink.gif
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Weight loss goal: 86lbs, Weight loss progress: 69.6lbs, Weight loss left: 16.4lbs
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post #65 of 127
When my cousin got married they had cream puffs for dessert. My sister was so mad (apparently she came just for the cake) that my other (not cousin's dad) uncle went into the back room and purchased an entire black forest cake for her from the restaurant and plunked it in front of her and told her to shut it.

Bride never found out, but its now a running joke in our immediate family.
Just a cute story.
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life is short, get a cakesafe.
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post #66 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by lulus

Not as tacky as this:

A couple booked my entire restaurant for a 'party' where their invited guests would order off a limited menu and pay for their own food. They omitted to mention that little detail on the invitation, which was for a wedding reception. So they pulled one on me and the guests. Needless to say, only 10% ordered any food, and they all came dressed well and bearing gifts. Huge loss for me, shocked faces all around for the guests, and the couple didn't even 'make the rounds' or talk to anybody but their wedding party. And then they sang songs of praise and worship.
I'm not kidding.



I did a wedding cake for a friend's wedding that did the very same thing! The limited menu and the cost to order off the menu was $30 per person for the adults and $20 for kids, NOT including beverages! I did not stay eventhough I was an invited guest. The wedding was also on site as the center where the restaurant was is like a little outdoor shopping area with a beautiful tiny chapel on the grounds, and an area for outdoor weddings. There are 2 other restaurants there too, but they were closed that day.

I didn't stick around long enough to see how many others left, but I am sure many were very upset about the deal.
post #67 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Denise

sham wow. That is incredibly tacky. I have heard it all.

Oddly, my uncle is quiet wealthy. When cousin got married, it was really a small do at a local private club during the day. Not formal just family and some friends. They charged for drinks at the bar. Get the h3ll out. Not for cokes or water but for alcohol. My uncle is a millionaire and groom's parents were too.

I can remember thinking "how tacky is this?" and I don't even drink!!



Ha ha...do we have the same uncle? icon_wink.gif
Or maybe there is some school in Texas for Rich Uncles that teaches them how to be tightwads, and screw others out of their money.
post #68 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by jentreu

When my cousin got married they had cream puffs for dessert. My sister was so mad (apparently she came just for the cake) that my other (not cousin's dad) uncle went into the back room and purchased an entire black forest cake for her from the restaurant and plunked it in front of her and told her to shut it.
Bride never found out, but its now a running joke in our immediate family.
Just a cute story.



Oh, that is funny as HECK!!! LOVE it!! icon_lol.gif Although, you'd be hard pressed to see me mad about cream puffs. Do we notice a trend, that I like ANYTHING sweet? Ugh! icon_rolleyes.gif

ETA: But that's my exact point... to some people a wedding is a big party where you eat cake. That's all they want! And they are willing to bring gifts for it! thumbs_up.gif
Melvira: Mistress of the dark... chocolate!

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Melvira: Mistress of the dark... chocolate!

Well that's just great. Peanut butter in my crack.
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post #69 of 127
We never have alcohol at our weddings at all.
Sparkling cider to toast the happy couple; and punch, soda pop, coffee, tea, etc... but NO booze.

That's not unusual around here, as drinking and driving is a HUGE no-no in this part of the country. Not to mention all the drunken 20-somethings (and older) acting like idiots during the reception.
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post #70 of 127
Oh wow, I most definitely expect cake at a wedding! I grew up in the South and there was always a cake cutting ceremony and then usually the cake was sliced and you came to the table and picked it up. (At my wedding it was taken to the kitchen and then delivered to the tables....yet SO many people, including my mom, said they didn't get cake! icon_mad.gif What the heck? Did the staff keep it!!?)

I noticed the weddings I went to in the North always had a dessert bar or a candy bar or an ice cream bar or a pastry table! Then there was cake! Alot of that cake got boxed up and sent home though, kind of as the "favor." I wanted to eat mine there and that's when I would hear from other guests that the wedding cake isn't usualy eaten there. icon_confused.gif (3 New York weddings)

A good friend of ours ran out of cake at their wedding! It was a TINY stacked cake and we were sooo disappointed that there wasn't enough cake for everyone that we stopped by a grocery store on the way home and bought an 8 inch cake, had the dishwasher employee (the baker had gone home!) scribble "congratulations" on it and we took it to the after party (the B and G weren't there, of course.) So weird to not provide enough cake!!!
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The definition of husband is one who takes out the trash and then declares he cleaned the whole house.
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post #71 of 127
Sometimes the person cutting the cake has no experience really doing it so they cut slices that are way too big and thus not enough cake. But then again sometimes it is the person who ordered it trying to save so they order less cake than they really need.
post #72 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chasey

Alot of that cake got boxed up and sent home though, kind of as the "favor." I wanted to eat mine there and that's when I would hear from other guests that the wedding cake isn't usualy eaten there. icon_confused.gif (3 New York weddings)



Chasey, this was a tradition in New England when I was growing up. Not so much now, I don't think, but everyone went home from a wedding with a favor and a slice of cake. If a single girl slept with the wedding cake under her pillow that night she would soon meet her husband to be. icon_biggrin.gif My DH and I were the first of our families/circle of friends to serve the cake as dessert.
post #73 of 127
When my friend got married, I had to talk her in to even ordering a cake, because she didn't like cake. I told her the same arguments....people were coming to her wedding, bringing her gifts...etc, they were expecting cake, and she needed to give them cake.

So....she did. The cake was pretty and it tasted good (not great, but good). The food however, was not so good. Rather than have a meal, she had buffet lines of finger foods (chicken strips, mini egg rolls, stuffed mushrooms, etc) that were cold by time I got to eat. However, when I walked past the bride & groom's table........they were eating steak, grilled potatoes, salad, a whole spread!!!!!!

I would never serve snacks to my guests as I sat up there eating steak!!!
post #74 of 127
I don't have a business, no clients, no..anything, but I just came across this thread and was a guest at my first wedding of the season last weekend, and I had to rag on the cake a little.

I sat with the grandmother of the groom who wasn't shy about everyone at the table knowing that her slice was still completely frozen. Mine was about half frozen, but I wasn't going to say anything. I'm amazed they were able to cut it. I am pretty terrible at smoothing buttercream, but I could (and have...) smoothed a cake better after a bottle of wine than whoever made this cake. I though about snapping a pic with the cell for cake wrecks (this was professionally made), but felt too bad to.

There was the ceremony, then cake cutting with a soda toast in the church, and after that...a private meal that only some guests were invited to. The aunt of the bride went around to select tables informing people if they were invited to the meal.

Tacky.
post #75 of 127
I have to say that reading these stories kind of makes my heart hurt. How people can treat the people that are SUPPOSED to be their friends and family so poorly... it kind of makes you sad for mankind in general. Ok, sorry, not trying to be melodramatic, but why can't we be respectful and courteous to each other? *sigh*

My SIL had a beautiful wedding, I did the cake and was a bridesmaid. After the ceremony there was a dinner, the B&G actually went into a separate room to eat. There was a hall for the guests, but they went into this little side room where no one else was 'allowed' to go, so they could eat their first meal together as husband and wife.

While I kind of understand, I still felt it was a huge snub to every one else. "Hey, we want your presents, but we don't actually want to be AROUND you!" Then the bride, who doesn't like me BTW, waited until I was on the opposite side of the hall cutting the wedding cake that I made to pop out and do their toast at the table where the wedding party sat.

I was the only one not up there, so I wasn't in the video. I felt that was pretty rude. Then they went back into their little room and expected me to bring them cake to share. icon_confused.gif All of a sudden I was their personal waitress. Nice. Snub me, then make me your slave. Awesome.
Melvira: Mistress of the dark... chocolate!

Well that's just great. Peanut butter in my crack.
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Melvira: Mistress of the dark... chocolate!

Well that's just great. Peanut butter in my crack.
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