Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Cake Decorating › Can you refrigerate fondant covered cakes?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Can you refrigerate fondant covered cakes? - Page 5

post #61 of 98
Well, this whole subject has always been of interest to me, because, I would like to use perishable fillings. However The last time I refrigerated a fondant covered cake, it was a disaster, major air bubbles, I had to refondant 3 out of the 5 tiers, on my daughters wedding cake. Soooo, I am very scared to try it again. I so desperately want a bigger variety of fillings, but am scared to death. IN fact, I want to use Toba's French Vanilla Buttercream in my cake this weekend, but I am not sure how long it can be out of fridge. It has no eggs, but lots of butter, any suggestions or tips from anyone who has used this delicious icing???
post #62 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by mayo2222

No offense to the OP or anyone else, but is it just me or does this question seem to get asked a lot, again and again. It would be nice to have FAQ sticky or even its own section where topics like this which could be found for quick reference.



No. It's not you. Talk about beating a dead horse. icon_lol.gif
everyday is a good day, some are just better than others.
Reply
everyday is a good day, some are just better than others.
Reply
post #63 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamawrobin

Quote:
Originally Posted by mayo2222

No offense to the OP or anyone else, but is it just me or does this question seem to get asked a lot, again and again. It would be nice to have FAQ sticky or even its own section where topics like this which could be found for quick reference.



No. It's not you. Talk about beating a dead horse. icon_lol.gif



In defense of the OP, if she's new she's not going to know. It might be nice to just point her in the right direction rather than assume she knows this is a belaboured subject.

As well, you always have the option of ignoring posts you've already answered elsewhere.
post #64 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by SallyBratt

Quote:
Originally Posted by mamawrobin

Quote:
Originally Posted by mayo2222

No offense to the OP or anyone else, but is it just me or does this question seem to get asked a lot, again and again. It would be nice to have FAQ sticky or even its own section where topics like this which could be found for quick reference.



No. It's not you. Talk about beating a dead horse. icon_lol.gif



In defense of the OP, if she's new she's not going to know. It might be nice to just point her in the right direction rather than assume she knows this is a belaboured subject.

As well, you always have the option of ignoring posts you've already answered elsewhere.



As was stated..."no offense to the op or anyone else" icon_wink.gif
everyday is a good day, some are just better than others.
Reply
everyday is a good day, some are just better than others.
Reply
post #65 of 98
[quote="MissRobin"]Well, this whole subject has always been of interest to me, because, I would like to use perishable fillings. However The last time I refrigerated a fondant covered cake, it was a disaster, major air bubbles, I had to refondant 3 out of the 5 tiers, on my daughters wedding cake. Soooo, I am very scared to try it again.
quote]

Just make sure to level all of the layers before you put the fillings in, and to really press down on the tier one it's filled. Don't smash it, obviously, but some people go so far as to put books or something heavy on them. I don't do that, but I give them a good press to make sure there's good adhesion between the layers.

Also, when you're doing the crumb coat, make sure that when you're icing where the two layers connect, that you're really pushing the icing into the crack. I think that a lot of times people don't really fill that space in, and air pockets will come out as a rsult. Really push the icing into the space first, then do the crumb coat.
post #66 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamawrobin

Quote:
Originally Posted by SallyBratt

Quote:
Originally Posted by mamawrobin

Quote:
Originally Posted by mayo2222

No offense to the OP or anyone else, but is it just me or does this question seem to get asked a lot, again and again. It would be nice to have FAQ sticky or even its own section where topics like this which could be found for quick reference.



No. It's not you. Talk about beating a dead horse. icon_lol.gif



In defense of the OP, if she's new she's not going to know. It might be nice to just point her in the right direction rather than assume she knows this is a belaboured subject.

As well, you always have the option of ignoring posts you've already answered elsewhere.



As was stated..."no offense to the op or anyone else" icon_wink.gif



Thanks for the help Robin! thumbs_up.gif

This was not meant to be a slight against anyone, but merely to point out that this subject and others are asked weekly. I just thought it might be a good idea to put a list of commonly asked questions/FAQs and make them a sticky, something along the lines of what Rylan did for tutorials. That way when people search (which is not always easy, but I hope that people try first) they don't have to get 100's of threads that are the same or that point back to another thread. Just an idea.....sorry to the OP for hijacking the thread
Matt
Reply
Matt
Reply
post #67 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by mayo2222

Quote:
Originally Posted by mamawrobin

Quote:
Originally Posted by SallyBratt

Quote:
Originally Posted by mamawrobin

Quote:
Originally Posted by mayo2222

No offense to the OP or anyone else, but is it just me or does this question seem to get asked a lot, again and again. It would be nice to have FAQ sticky or even its own section where topics like this which could be found for quick reference.



No. It's not you. Talk about beating a dead horse. icon_lol.gif



In defense of the OP, if she's new she's not going to know. It might be nice to just point her in the right direction rather than assume she knows this is a belaboured subject.

As well, you always have the option of ignoring posts you've already answered elsewhere.



As was stated..."no offense to the op or anyone else" icon_wink.gif



Thanks for the help Robin! thumbs_up.gif

This was not meant to be a slight against anyone, but merely to point out that this subject and others are asked weekly. I just thought it might be a good idea to put a list of commonly asked questions/FAQs and make them a sticky, something along the lines of what Rylan did for tutorials. That way when people search (which is not always easy, but I hope that people try first) they don't have to get 100's of threads that are the same or that point back to another thread. Just an idea.....sorry to the OP for hijacking the thread



I understand that. I'm just going on what I was like when I 1st started on these forums and I went straight to the question and answer sections. I didn't think to look for FAQs. If redirected there I would certainly go...but not everyone will know to do that when they 1st start. That's all I was saying.
post #68 of 98
mayo2222-- No matter what you do, people will ignore the stickies and keep asking the questions! I have a calendar and very specific information for brides next to the contact form on my website, and they still email me for dates that are totally booked up. People just don't think to check.

Sallybratt- You're right about the health dept. The package that they sent me was very clear that they want everything refrigerated between construction and delivery. They actually called me to ask about the IMBC recipe, too, since they had a question about using the egg whites in a buttercream before they'd approve it for use. They'd not only throw out a cream cheese filling cake that had been sitting out for three days, they'd also give you a violation and put you on the "repeat in a month" inspection list.

I don't think this is beating a dead horse, not when there's advice like "don't refrigerate a fondant cake ever" being posted.
post #69 of 98
A little off subject, but, I did my first wedding cake a couple of weeks ago and wanted it to taste good and I have always used wilton fondant. I see that alot of people use Satin Ice with great results so I used that .. it did taste good, but it was sooo dry and cracked and tore so bad that the morning of the wedding I was baking and the end result was a buttercream wedding cake and not in the original design the bride wanted. Is it just me or has anyone else had this kind of a problem?
"Efforts and courage are not enough without purpose and direction". John F. Kennedy
Reply
"Efforts and courage are not enough without purpose and direction". John F. Kennedy
Reply
post #70 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by kandyc10

A little off subject, but, I did my first wedding cake a couple of weeks ago and wanted it to taste good and I have always used wilton fondant. I see that alot of people use with great results so I used that .. it did taste good, but it was sooo dry and cracked and tore so bad that the morning of the wedding I was baking and the end result was a buttercream wedding cake and not in the original design the bride wanted. Is it just me or has anyone else had this kind of a problem?



I have problems with Satin Ice being dry too, especially when having to roll out for a large tier. I like Fondarific much better but it's a lot more expensive. Satin Ice works great with tylose for figure sculpting though.
post #71 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by kandyc10

A little off subject, but, I did my first wedding cake a couple of weeks ago and wanted it to taste good and I have always used wilton fondant. I see that alot of people use with great results so I used that .. it did taste good, but it was sooo dry and cracked and tore so bad that the morning of the wedding I was baking and the end result was a buttercream wedding cake and not in the original design the bride wanted. Is it just me or has anyone else had this kind of a problem?



I saw a few posts about SatinIce complaints recently, so it might have been a problem with the fondant. But why were you baking the morning of the wedding? Don't stress yourself out like that, get it done the day before and you won't have to drive yourself crazy!
post #72 of 98
Satin Ice does dry quite quickly, you do have to work very fast with. The first 20lb bucket I got was great, once I figured out how to work quickly. My second batch was sticky, and I have to add cornstarch to get it a good consistency. If you can work fast, it's a good priced fondant, but there are others that will allow you more time if you have the $$.
post #73 of 98
[/quote]I saw a few posts about SatinIce complaints recently, so it might have been a problem with the fondant. But why were you baking the morning of the wedding? Don't stress yourself out like that, get it done the day before and you won't have to drive yourself crazy![/quote

I covered it the day before first white all over then a red swagged overlay. I got up the morning of to put on the plates and add the fondant pearls and when I put the spatula under them to move them the fondant literally started crumbling off the sides, I had no choice but to bake. It was a nightmare!
"Efforts and courage are not enough without purpose and direction". John F. Kennedy
Reply
"Efforts and courage are not enough without purpose and direction". John F. Kennedy
Reply
post #74 of 98
Now there's a case for refrigeration right there. When I need to move my cakes to the fondant covered board I pop them in the freezer for a few minutes to firm them up. That way I can easily lift them with my hands and not worry about denting the fondant.

I don't know how others do it but this works for me.

I've never heard of SI crumbling like that tho. That's odd.
post #75 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by momma28




Adevag wrote: If you decide to refrigerate your cakes I would not do any hand painting on them before refrigeration (if that is included in your design). The risk of getting condensation on your cakes once you take them out from the fridge (for an hour or so, depending on size) until the cake is back at room temp, and the condensation would probably ruin your paintings.

I was scared the first time I refrigerated a handpainted cake but had no choice (perishable filling) but it was no problem at all. Just make sure that the food coloring you use to paint has dried completely before you put it in the fridge. at that point its just like you tinted to fondant, its in there and doesnt bleed or run HTH



Thanks momma28. That is good to know and very helpful. I have always been scared, but will give it a try when I get an opportunity.
Sofia
Reply
Sofia
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cake Decorating
Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Cake Decorating › Can you refrigerate fondant covered cakes?