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Can you refrigerate fondant covered cakes? - Page 3

post #31 of 98
I think cake without pershible ingredients is something I would pass on. It better have fresh natural ingredients with a vry short shelf life, and not a speck of crisco anywhere on it.
post #32 of 98
I refrigerate all of my fondant cakes. That's how I was taught to do it and I think Bonnie Gordon is pretty much an expert in the cake world.

What filling worth eating isn't perishable? Personally, I wouldn't touch Crisco based spackle with a 10' pole...and neither would any of my customers.
post #33 of 98
The fondant cakes I refrigerate don't develop the air bubbles. Maybe you could try pressing down on the tiers really well before crumb-coating them, that helps to get out any air pockets that are in there that will move around. You can get air bubbles with fondant or buttercream, I don't think it's a fondant issue so much as an air-pocket-in-the-cake issue.
post #34 of 98
I use ganache on most all of my cakes. I've never even heard of crisco spackle. icon_lol.gif
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post #35 of 98
it's 'butter'cream but the some or all of the butter is replaced with shortening. It's a bit of a misnomer to call it buttercream...really.

Here's a recipe I just found online for it. it's sounds horrid...

1 ½ cups of Crisco (1 ½ sticks of Crisco)
2 Tablespoons imitation vanilla extract put in cup,
then add milk to equal 1/2 cup total.
2 lb bag of powdered sugar

Place Crisco in a mixer bowl. Add milk/vanilla mixture and a little powdered sugar.
Mix on low speed gradually adding the rest of the powdered sugar.
Mix on the highest setting for 7 minutes, stopping in the middle of mixing to scrape the bowl sides and bottom. Be sure to mix for the full 7 minutes.

Hint:
If using white Crisco, so the icing will be white, add ½ teaspoon butter flavoring or oil to the recipe before mixing. Also use clear vanilla extract.
If using butter flavored Crisco, there is no need to add the butter flavoring. You can also use regular imitation vanilla extract. The icing will be a cream color.
post #36 of 98
Gagalishis!
post #37 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by SallyBratt

it's 'butter'cream but the some or all of the butter is replaced with shortening. It's a bit of a misnomer to call it buttercream...really.

Here's a recipe I just found online for it. it's sounds horrid...

1 ½ cups of Crisco (1 ½ sticks of Crisco)
2 Tablespoons imitation vanilla extract put in cup,
then add milk to equal 1/2 cup total.
2 lb bag of powdered sugar

Place Crisco in a mixer bowl. Add milk/vanilla mixture and a little powdered sugar.
Mix on low speed gradually adding the rest of the powdered sugar.
Mix on the highest setting for 7 minutes, stopping in the middle of mixing to scrape the bowl sides and bottom. Be sure to mix for the full 7 minutes.

Hint:
If using white Crisco, so the icing will be white, add ½ teaspoon butter flavoring or oil to the recipe before mixing. Also use clear vanilla extract.
If using butter flavored Crisco, there is no need to add the butter flavoring. You can also use regular imitation vanilla extract. The icing will be a cream color.




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post #38 of 98
At least there's some milk in it. I've seen some recipes where there's nothing but imitation this and that plus the crisco.
post #39 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

At least there's some milk in it. I've seen some recipes where there's nothing but imitation this and that plus the crisco.



I found one on this site, actually, that's pretty much just crisco and powdered sugar.

Do people really eat that?
post #40 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by SallyBratt

Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

At least there's some milk in it. I've seen some recipes where there's nothing but imitation this and that plus the crisco.



I found one on this site, actually, that's pretty much just crisco and powdered sugar.

Do people really eat that?



That has to be the lovely W----- recipe, used for practice in many classes. Many of the students get that confused with real icing and actually feed that to people.
"Qu'ils mangent de la brioche." -- Marie Antoinette
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post #41 of 98
We used pure crisco icing to practice roses in culinary school, but that was considered the "broke student's practice icing" because you could use it over and over and it wouldn't rot.

A lot of people in the U.S. are used to non-butter buttercream because that's what they use in grocery stores, and they don't know any better. I use both IMBC and the confectioner's sugar icings, some people really like the sweeter one, but it's not my choice. I do put butter in mine, though, and when people try it they say that it tastes really good (if they like the sweeter version not IMBC.) I always tell then that it's because it actually has butter in it, and it's not just crisco. It grosses them out to think that they've been eating all-crisco icing, but they don't know that's what it is until someone tells them.

I likey my meringue buttercreams, personally.
post #42 of 98
I have never had anyone ask me for sweeter icing, quite the opposite, they ask me for icing that's "not too sweet." Of course it's icing and it's going to be sweet, but the PS/Crisco is sickeningly sweet. Just my opinion, of course.
"Qu'ils mangent de la brioche." -- Marie Antoinette
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"Qu'ils mangent de la brioche." -- Marie Antoinette
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post #43 of 98
I was just reading the Confetti Cakes book (Elisa Strauss) and she said to NOT refrigerate a fondant covered cake. And I agree because if you use royal icing stencilling on top, for example, the condensation will melt the icing right off. It can also ruin any sugar flowers that are on the cake and cause bubbles under the fondant.
post #44 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by bvwilliams

I have to make a cake (that consist of 3 cakes) for someone but there is no way that I can decorate all 3 cakes on the same day. How long can fondant covered cakes sit out or can they be refrigerated?

Thanks,
Brenda



If you decide to refrigerate your cakes I would not do any hand painting on them before refrigeration (if that is included in your design). The risk of getting condensation on your cakes once you take them out from the fridge (for an hour or so, depending on size) until the cake is back at room temp, and the condensation would probably ruin your paintings.
Sofia
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Sofia
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post #45 of 98
Sugar is an incredible preservative! Check your ph level on fillings and icings. You'll be surprised how many (other than creams) do not need refrigeration. Yes, how fondant reacts totally has to do with humidity, in the refrigeration unit you are using. Here in Florida, I rarely put fondant in the fridge. Since all my cakes will be eaten within 3 days, I use many fresh fillings and icings, but no cream. Again, check your ph level. I would die to have Duffs walk in! BTW, according to Colette Peters, she never puts a fondant cake in the refrigerator. No need, everything has sugar in it.
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