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Cooked Fudge - Page 2

post #16 of 43
This is a slightly grainy fudge, like the old fashioned kind, but easier

Chocolate Fudge
1 cup sugar
1 small box chocolate pudding mix, NOT INSTANT
4 tsp instant coffee
1/2 cup evaporated milk
1 Tbs. butter

mix everything in a saucepan and bring to a boil. Boil for 4 minutes. Remove from heat and add :

1 cup chopped nuts

Beat until thickened. Pour into buttered pan Makes 1 1/2 lbs fudge
post #17 of 43
Back to thermometers for just a bit -

You can test your cooking thermometers by placing them in boiling water.
The temperature of boiling water is 212 degrees F and 100 degrees C. If your thermometer reads at these temps, it's still in working order.

Theresa icon_smile.gif
post #18 of 43
I agree, Marshmallow fudge - nasty. Hershey's all the way. Recipe, to the best of my knowledge (I do it off the top of my head, so correct if wrong)

3 cups sugar
2/3 cups cocoa
1 1/2 cup milk, ( i use canned and do 3/4 cup milk and 3/4 cup water)

Cook in saucepan on low heat, stirring constantly until it forms a soft ball in water, or reaches soft ball stage on thermometer. Remove from heat, add vanilla and pat of butter. Let cool a little and then beat the h--- out of it. when it loses its sheen, pour into well buttered pan.
post #19 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by cutthecake

I've checked both the Hershey's syrup and cocoa cans, and I couldn't find a fudge recipe. The Hersheys.com website seems to have only quick-cook or marshmallow fudge recipes.
Can someone please direct me to the Hershey's fudge recipe mentioned above?
Thanks.



I can't get to my recipe at the moment but did a search for Hershy's old fashioned fudge and here it is. I usually never let it sit so long to cool or even stir until it loses it's glossiness because it would become so stiff. So maybe that is where the crumbly fudge comes into play. I would stir until it seemed to get stiffer and then pour into a casserole dish. I would also score it into bite size pieces since it would be easier to cut. I do remember it crumbling on me twice and thought I did something wrong.

http://www.food.com/recipe/hersheys-old-fashioned-rich-cocoa-fudge-4573
post #20 of 43
Here is the recipe from the Hershey's website. My sister said it wasn't there or on the back of the can anymore but it is at least still on the website.

http://www.hersheys.com/recipes/5303/Rich-Cocoa-Fudge.aspx

it's the same as the one I posted above
post #21 of 43
that is the recipe we used . we used condensed milk (half milk , half water). I make a chocolate icing the same way for my cakes, (old fashion way also. You cook it on top of the stove to a certain consistency , poke holds in your cake layers and put the fudge icing on each layer. It is so good. My mama made it that way, My family loves for me to make it that way. I freeze the cake for a couple of days , before cutting into it. Makes it that much more wonderful. I cook the icing to a soft ball stage.
post #22 of 43
Has anyone ever tried this?

2-ingredient fudge, from canned frosting and chocolate chips.

Here's a webpage about it -

http://www.nancys-kitchen.com/fudge-recipe-variations.htm

Theresa icon_smile.gif
post #23 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by icer101

that is the recipe we used . we used condensed milk (half milk , half water). I make a chocolate icing the same way for my cakes, (old fashion way also. You cook it on top of the stove to a certain consistency , poke holds in your cake layers and put the fudge icing on each layer. It is so good. My mama made it that way, My family loves for me to make it that way. I freeze the cake for a couple of days , before cutting into it. Makes it that much more wonderful. I cook the icing to a soft ball stage.



This sounds good - will have to try it. The last time I made chocolate icing I decided to follow the Hershey can recipe but it was thinner than I wanted so I added more PS and cocoa for the right consistency. While it was still in a thicker consistency I thought it would make good truffle filling.
post #24 of 43
Thanks for all the help and advice. I couldn't salvage the first batch of fudge I made. It turned into chocolate pecan soup. I'm planning on trying the Hershey's recipe tomorrow.
I realize there's no exact time for these stages, but can someone provide some approximate times?
How long should it take for the fudge to reach the soft ball stage?
How long should it take for the mixture to cool down?
How long should the fudge be beaten?
It seeme like each of these stages took forever. Is that normal?
Thanks again.
post #25 of 43
The recipe we have always used for fudge (ours is a two toned one) has butter, sugar, evaporated milk, and marshmallow creme. It is cooked on the stove top until it boils, then cooked for another 5 or so mins. We then mix half with chocolate chips (nuts and rum can be added), pour that in the bottom and mix the other half with butterscotch chips and that is spread on top.
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post #26 of 43
Batch #2--The Hershey's recipe (http://www.hersheys.com/recipes/5303/Rich-Cocoa-Fudge.aspx)

I followed the recipe PRECISELY as written.

The fudge was like chocolate pecan bubble gum at first, then it dried into a crumbly mass that wouldn't spread into pan. And so much of the stuff was stuck in the bottom of the saucepan.

What am I doing wrong? AGAIN?
Thanks.
post #27 of 43
cutthecake - when you have the fudge on the stove, you cook it until it reaches a soft ball stage. That means if you drop a little bit of the mixture in a glass of cool water it will form a ball. Some times it will flatten out when you add it to the water, but if you reach with your fingers and pick it up, you can roll it into a soft ball.

Once you take it off the heat, I let mine sit for about 3-4 minutes on a cool burner, then I start beating and mixing the candy. You will need to beat it consistently (I do sometimes set the spoon down for a second to give my arm a rest, but you have to keep mixing it). It is ready to pour when it thickens up and if you scrape the side of the pot you start to see it crusting on the side. Immediately pour it into a pan to set. It may take 20-30 minutes to firm enough to cut.

My Mom always told me never to make candy when it rains. Well I do anyway. I just turn up the heat in my house to take the moisture out of the air.

Hope this helps.
post #28 of 43
Thanks, cricket!
The Hershey's recipe says to let the pot of fudge cool down to 110*, which took about a half hour or so, before beating with the spoon. I used a candy thermometer, which I tested first so I know it was working properly.
It's a cold, dry day--no rain.
I watched and waited patiently and obediently during every stage of the fudge-making.
I'm so frustrated!
post #29 of 43
I do what cricket said. Let it sit a few minutes and stir then pour onto a buttered cookie sheet - what my dad always did. Sometimes he would add 1/4 cup of peanut butter instead of the butter. I have never been able to let it cool to 110 degrees or even stir it until it is no longer glossy. It becomes to thick to stir and it does become too crumbly to try and pour out.
post #30 of 43
I made this one last night, super easy and tasted great. I used premium Ghiradelli chocolate chips. You could switch up the flavoring and additions to it to meet whatever taste you are looking for.

http://www.womansday.com/Recipes/Candy-Cane-Chocolate-Fudge-Recipe
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