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Glycerine in royal icing? - Page 3

post #31 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by kikiandkyle View Post

I think they gave up enough for tradition, I'm sure Kate didn't really want to have all the stuff that was on there but she did. I doubt it was all fruit cake either.
What can I say? I'm a saddo and like tradition icon_smile.gif
New to Cake Central, but have been baking from scratch and decorating for 20 years and running my business for 3 years.
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New to Cake Central, but have been baking from scratch and decorating for 20 years and running my business for 3 years.
Misc 3D Cakes
(10 photos)
Anniversary
(2 photos)
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post #32 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by 105sruss View Post
 

You see what a techno idiot I am I hadn't even realized I was talking to a different person. I used to know Westcliffe really well but haven't been there for about 30  years. I lived in Es*** for 23 years. I hope that Jeanne is still on line, I'll bet she's having a real chuckle at me lol.

I'm here!

I am in the US.  I live in a town (Erie)  that is right on the Great Lakes.  No decorating shops here, just a couple of hobby stores where I can get some things in a pinch.  I either make it or have it shipped in.

 

I'm enjoying our exchange - learning much more than you realize. 

 

Jeanne

I love what I do and do what I love

https://www.facebook.com/JeanneWinslowCakeDesign

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I love what I do and do what I love

https://www.facebook.com/JeanneWinslowCakeDesign

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post #33 of 59

I agree Lindseyj. I also use sugar paste where required as I said kid's cakes for instance, as for the Brit lady taking offence, we are all entitled to our likes and dislikes and opinions. The large sugar roses on this wedding cake are made from sugar paste by me and I am also horrified looking at that close up I can't believe it. Yes Royal Icing was invented for the Royals and protocol demands that you give the best to dignitaries. Whatever anyone's likes or dislikes are you should only use the very best which of course is Royal Icing not sugar paste, it cannot compare with Royal Icing for taste and finish, hence the reason the very wealthy and stores like Harrods and Fortnums seldom have anything else. Nice to see that Jeanne is still with us. I keep popping off to do a bit more and coming back. Nice to see there are some more Brit night Owls besides me though.

post #34 of 59

Just to add to the bit about what Kate wanted, she was given a free hand in choosing her wedding cake and they were both free to invite whoever they wanted. If you read further back you will see that I haven't knocked sugar paste decorations.

post #35 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by 105sruss View Post

Hi,
To me sugar paste/fondant icing is a poor substitute for wedding cakes and became popular because lazy bakers found it quicker and easier to do.

Just the bakers that use it I guess.
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post #36 of 59

Hi Jeanne,

Victoria sponge was invented for the well known lady who was never amused. It is made using 6,6,6 & 3. 6oz margarine or butter. 6oz castor sugar, 6oz of Self Raising flour, 3 medium sized eggs plus a pinch of salt. Cream together the butter and sugar until light and fluffy, add the eggs one at a time with a tablespoon of the sieved flour and salt, beating well between each one. Fold in the rest of the flour and divide evenly between two 8 inch sponge pans. Cook in a preheated oven to 375F, 190C, gas mark 5, or for fan ovens 350F, 180C, gas mark 4, for 20 minutes or until golden and well reason. It shouldn't dent when lightly touched. Leave to cool for 5-10 minutes then turn out on to a wire rack. When cold fill with Raspberry Jam and butter cream or fresh cream and lightly dust the top with either castor or icing sugar. If you want to be really posh and Queen Vic you could place a paper Doily on the top and sieve the icing sugar lightly over it and hey presto when you remove the doily you have a work of art. Of course the top on this one is plain because it has got the marzipan and Royal Icing on it.

post #37 of 59

No the baker's shops that started using it because it was  quicker, easier and required little skill and training to cover a cake with it. As I said earlier, it is done in one hit but you never get the finish that you get with Royal Icing or the taste. Bakers no longer have to pay for apprenticeships, get more cakes done in a lot less time, still charging what they would have for Royal Icing and making a mint. They only need 1 or 2 skilled workers to make the decorations and they can be done well in advance. It is so much easier to make things like frills with sugar paste using the tools that you now have for it. Try making one with Royal Icing and nozzles and you'll see what I mean.

post #38 of 59
While there may be a fondant flower in my avatar photo, that doesn't mean I'm too lazy to know how to do string work and other royal icing techniques.

I can only assume that you've never worked with or tried to make fondant, given that you think it's such an easy skill. We don't all just get it from a box and it doesn't all taste bad.
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post #39 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by 105sruss View Post
 

Hi Jeanne,

Victoria sponge was invented for the well known lady who was never amused. It is made using 6,6,6 & 3. 6oz margarine or butter. 6oz castor sugar, 6oz of Self Raising flour, 3 medium sized eggs plus a pinch of salt. Cream together the butter and sugar until light and fluffy, add the eggs one at a time with a tablespoon of the sieved flour and salt, beating well between each one. Fold in the rest of the flour and divide evenly between two 8 inch sponge pans. Cook in a preheated oven to 375F, 190C, gas mark 5, or for fan ovens 350F, 180C, gas mark 4, for 20 minutes or until golden and well reason. It shouldn't dent when lightly touched. Leave to cool for 5-10 minutes then turn out on to a wire rack. When cold fill with Raspberry Jam and butter cream or fresh cream and lightly dust the top with either castor or icing sugar. If you want to be really posh and Queen Vic you could place a paper Doily on the top and sieve the icing sugar lightly over it and hey presto when you remove the doily you have a work of art. Of course the top on this one is plain because it has got the marzipan and Royal Icing on it.

 

Thanks!  i copied into my files.  How's the cake coming?

I love what I do and do what I love

https://www.facebook.com/JeanneWinslowCakeDesign

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I love what I do and do what I love

https://www.facebook.com/JeanneWinslowCakeDesign

Reply
post #40 of 59

Sandra,

 

I'm curious.  I read an article that it is illegal to sell chilled/washed eggs in the UK as it removes the protective coating.  It also stated they can be found near baking isles.  Just wondering if the article was correct.

 

On the subject of the Royal wedding cake done in fondant.  Although the decorations are very pretty the actual execution of the sugar paste is anything but.  There is bulging, sides are not straight and the edges are very round.  IMO, not well done.  I hope I don't cause an international incident - lol

 

Jeanne

I love what I do and do what I love

https://www.facebook.com/JeanneWinslowCakeDesign

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I love what I do and do what I love

https://www.facebook.com/JeanneWinslowCakeDesign

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post #41 of 59

I don't know why you are getting so nasty we are all entitled to our own opinions. I suggest that you read all of my replies and you will see that I used to make it and have done extensive work over the years using both, but never to cover my fruit cakes. I'm 71 now and mainly make for family and friends but I still say that Royal Icing is a far more difficult art than fondant. I take it by your answers that you own a baker's shop and the title says it all " Cheap cakes make cheap customers". I would think that you are fairly young and have only been in the trade yourself since it became "The Fashion" to have fondant. Therefore you have never gone through the years of training and apprenticeships that master baker's like Percy Ingle used to. I don't even know if they exist anymore but you get the gyst. Today's baker's shops don't do any of that.

post #42 of 59
I'm not the one calling people lazy! Before you start calling other people nasty try reading what you write yourself!

Take what you want from my answers (you're wrong by the way on just about all of your assumptions). Just stop attacking other people's skills.
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post #43 of 59

Yes it's true and they are found by the baking isles. I don't think you'll cause a major upset over the Royal cake, just look at mine and Lindseyj's answers. It's the first time I've seen it in close up and I'm still in shock. Fiona what's her name is making a mint after having done this and it's a disgrace. I know that it wasn't all done by her, she employed minions to help but she did oversee it all. Strangely enough my Grandson's Fiancee would make a great lookalike for Kate, she's the image of her. Did you catch the Vitoria Sponge?

Sandra

post #44 of 59

As I said, read the rest of my replies, I haven't attacked anyone's skills. You need to stop being so paranoid.

post #45 of 59

Hey Jeanne, I don't know about you starting a war I think I've started world war 3, I'm being taken right out of context here. Never mind I can take it.

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