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should I torte wedding cake???? - Page 2

post #16 of 49
Well, this link used to have a tuturial on cakes from start to finish. Now she has it available on DVD. I watched the tutorial she had on her site before and it was very helpful. Maybe you should concider purchasing her DVD.

http://www.creative designs cakes.com/custom3_2.html
post #17 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by ttehan4

Yes, I split the two layers as well. My wedding cakes have two layers of filling and a layer of buttercream in the middle. Starting from the top there is cake, filling, cake, buttercream, cake, filling, cake, cake board.

Im going to look for a tutorial for you. I will post as soon as I find it.



I do torte my wedding cakes, my question for leah was about her finished layer height, but thanks for going to the trouble to help.

icon_smile.gif
post #18 of 49
Trying to educate here, not meaning to be a smarty pants....so please don't scream at me.

By definition (found in Webster's Dictionary) a TORTE is a CAKE no matter how many layers. The word TORTE is synonymous with CAKE.

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/torte.

So, a 1 layer cake (sheet cake) is a torte. When you say you have a 2 layer cake you can also say you have a 2 layer torte....4 layer cake=4 layer torte....etc.....

It's just always been a pet peeve of mine when people use the word torte as an act of layering a cake when it defines any cake.
Gayle
"The greatest pleasure in life is doing what people say you cannot do."
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Gayle
"The greatest pleasure in life is doing what people say you cannot do."
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post #19 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by maisyone2

Trying to educate here, not meaning to be a smarty pants....so please don't scream at me.

By definition (found in Webster's Dictionary) a TORTE is a CAKE no matter how many layers. The word TORTE is synonymous with CAKE.

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/torte.

So, a 1 layer cake (sheet cake) is a torte. When you say you have a 2 layer cake you can also say you have a 2 layer torte....4 layer cake=4 layer torte....etc.....

It's just always been a pet peeve of mine when people use the word torte as an act of layering a cake when it defines any cake.



Ahhh, how about this...
I do split, fill, ice and stack (using SPS, of course) my wedding cakes!
Thanks for the clarification thumbs_up.gif .
post #20 of 49
all my cakes are torted (4 layers of cake, 3 layers of filling), regardless of whether its for a wedding, shower, etc. invest in a Agbay, makes it a breeze!
Pray The Rosary
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post #21 of 49
I bake my 2 cakes just below the pan line, then split and fill. They are alittle taller, but I think they look great that way. Thought I don't use the SPS system so exact height doesnt matter to me (do cakes have to be 4in exactly for SPS?)
post #22 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeandDazzle

I bake my 2 cakes just below the pan line, then split and fill. They are alittle taller, but I think they look great that way. Thought I don't use the SPS system so exact height doesnt matter to me (do cakes have to be 4in exactly for SPS?)



The SPS pillars come in different sizes, the 4" ones being the shortest. The layers do not HAVE to be that size, it just saves from having to trim the pillars.
post #23 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by maisyone2

Trying to educate here, not meaning to be a smarty pants....so please don't scream at me.

By definition (found in Webster's Dictionary) a TORTE is a CAKE no matter how many layers. The word TORTE is synonymous with CAKE.

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/torte.

So, a 1 layer cake (sheet cake) is a torte. When you say you have a 2 layer cake you can also say you have a 2 layer torte....4 layer cake=4 layer torte....etc.....

It's just always been a pet peeve of mine when people use the word torte as an act of layering a cake when it defines any cake.



Free speech is a wonderful thing. Responses are also part of that freedom. To that I say SO WHAT.

mIKE
post #24 of 49
i was taught, when you split a layer and dam and fill it, that is called torting. correct me if i am wrong. i still use that term today.
post #25 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by icer101

i was taught, when you split a layer and dam and fill it, that is called torting. correct me if i am wrong. i still use that term today.



As was I, icer...but apparently icon_confused.gif

I was also under the impression that a torte (when describing a type of cake) usually contained no flour...but hey - I'm just really interested the height issue...
post #26 of 49
Is there an advantage (as far as taste) to splitting the two layers and having three layers of cake and three layers of icing? icon_smile.gif
post #27 of 49
I have four layers of cake, three layers of filling, all iced with smbc... I think the taste is way better then the hunk of cake with alittle filling... and you get alittle filling with every bite!
post #28 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by m1m

Is there an advantage (as far as taste) to splitting the two layers and having three layers of cake and three layers of icing? icon_smile.gif



Absolutely! Just as CakeandDazzle says. It makes for a better ratio of cake to filling in every bite.

Also, so many people complain of bulges when they stack 2 layers. If you tort(e) your layers, you can divide the same amount of filling over 3 areas and--voila--no bulges! To me, that makes torting worth the time and effort.

Rae
I love you, but your emergency is not my crisis!

They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
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I love you, but your emergency is not my crisis!

They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
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post #29 of 49
Doesn't torting it in so many layers make it challenging to move such thin layers of cake without it breaking?
post #30 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakefort

Doesn't torting it in so many layers make it challenging to move such thin layers of cake without it breaking?

not if you do the cutting when it's slightly frozen, and/or using cake cardboards to move the layers of cake (slide it under the cake when you tort it .... slide it off of the cardboard when putting it back in place).
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