Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Recipes › Please write proper measurements
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Please write proper measurements - Page 4

post #46 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by prterrell


As for fruit-flavored gelatin (which is what Jello is), I have no idea if that is something that is eaten outside the US/NA or not.



I might be wrong (please do correct me!), but US "Jello" is UK "JellY" ("jelly" I think might be the American word for the British 'Jam' [like a fruit preserve]???). Jelly (e.g. from the brand Rowntrees) is eaten lots in the UK and it's readily available at most grocery stores.

I see interesting recipes here including pudding mixes, but I haven't a CLUE what their equivalent would be in the UK. Can someone explain what it is please?

Thanks icon_smile.gif
post #47 of 94
I just ruined a cake because it said 1 jar marshmallow fluff -- there are two vastly different sizes!!!
post #48 of 94
Lomfise,

Try stores with Middle Eastern products for raw, unsalted pistachios.
post #49 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by superdobbers

Quote:
Originally Posted by prterrell


As for fruit-flavored gelatin (which is what Jello is), I have no idea if that is something that is eaten outside the US/NA or not.



I might be wrong (please do correct me!), but US "Jello" is UK "JellY" ("jelly" I think might be the American word for the British 'Jam' [like a fruit preserve]???). Jelly (e.g. from the brand Rowntrees) is eaten lots in the UK and it's readily available at most grocery stores.

I see interesting recipes here including pudding mixes, but I haven't a CLUE what their equivalent would be in the UK. Can someone explain what it is please?

Thanks icon_smile.gif



Angel Delight thumbs_up.gif
AKA: bonjovibabe
Reply
AKA: bonjovibabe
Reply
post #50 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by newmansmom2004

..... and a few are slightly off weight than our traditional 1/4 lb. sticks we're used to so that old "one stick of butter" in a recipe isn't gonna cut it anymore.



Uh-oh! icon_surprised.gif But you are so right.
post #51 of 94
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mensch

Lomfise,

Try stores with Middle Eastern products for raw, unsalted pistachios.



Will do, thanks. thumbs_up.gif
There is no better therapy than baking a cake - well, perhaps eating it.

Take care of the Earth, it's the only one we've got.
Reply
There is no better therapy than baking a cake - well, perhaps eating it.

Take care of the Earth, it's the only one we've got.
Reply
post #52 of 94
When I was younger I used to go buy food almost every single day, just like has been mentioned. I liked just buying fresh for that night. I kept a few staples that you need of course, but I'd pick out my meat, veg, etc. fresh every day. (But still at the same old grocery store, so the food was probably sitting there for a week anyway.) I wish our country were more conducive to that, but we don't have the amazing fresh food markets that other countries have. Yes, in some places they do, unfortunately I live in the middle of the country, not in California or some big, fancy city that has 'everything'. The closest thing we have to a farmer's market is that creepy old guy that sits in his car at the bank with a bag of cauliflower on his front seat. icon_lol.gif

And yet, I live in farm country. Literally. I am surrounded by farms. I need to learn how to garden better, with my huge yard I could never go to the grocery store again. (Except for milk and cheese... I'm not keeping a cow! Hahaha!)
Melvira: Mistress of the dark... chocolate!

Well that's just great. Peanut butter in my crack.
Reply
Melvira: Mistress of the dark... chocolate!

Well that's just great. Peanut butter in my crack.
Reply
post #53 of 94
What about eggs, Melvira? Are you willing to keep chickens? I can't believe that a couple in our church have chickens in their backyard, and we live in a suburb of Chicago! They were trying to convince me one day that I should get some, that the eggs are fresher, better quality, etc. I told them that I used 72 eggs in one week recently -- well, they get 2 eggs per day from those chickens. I don't think that would cut it for me!
post #54 of 94
Actually there are many farms around me that sell fresh eggs! My cousin used to, but they got rid of all their chickens a few years back. They stick to corn now. He also used to raise a few hogs, but I don't think he's doing that now either. My uncle was a hog farmer. The stench was incredible, but he'd always laugh and take a deep sniff and say, "Smells like money to me!" icon_rolleyes.gif
Melvira: Mistress of the dark... chocolate!

Well that's just great. Peanut butter in my crack.
Reply
Melvira: Mistress of the dark... chocolate!

Well that's just great. Peanut butter in my crack.
Reply
post #55 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by superdobbers

Quote:
Originally Posted by prterrell


As for fruit-flavored gelatin (which is what Jello is), I have no idea if that is something that is eaten outside the US/NA or not.



I might be wrong (please do correct me!), but US "Jello" is UK "JellY" ("jelly" I think might be the American word for the British 'Jam' [like a fruit preserve]???). Jelly (e.g. from the brand Rowntrees) is eaten lots in the UK and it's readily available at most grocery stores.

I see interesting recipes here including pudding mixes, but I haven't a CLUE what their equivalent would be in the UK. Can someone explain what it is please?

Thanks icon_smile.gif



I think your right about the jello/jelly/jam thing, i once told an american friend i had strawberry jam on toast for supper and he freaked right out, couldnt ever imagine combination of of dessert and toast lol
post #56 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by superdobbers

Quote:
Originally Posted by prterrell


As for fruit-flavored gelatin (which is what Jello is), I have no idea if that is something that is eaten outside the US/NA or not.



I might be wrong (please do correct me!), but US "Jello" is UK "JellY" ("jelly" I think might be the American word for the British 'Jam' [like a fruit preserve]???). Jelly (e.g. from the brand Rowntrees) is eaten lots in the UK and it's readily available at most grocery stores.

I see interesting recipes here including pudding mixes, but I haven't a CLUE what their equivalent would be in the UK. Can someone explain what it is please?

Thanks icon_smile.gif



Jello is flavored & sweetened gelatine that comes in a box in a large variety of flavors. Jelly is the similar to jam, without the fruit & seeds.

American box pudding packages are the equivalent to your UK custard sachets, except that ours come in a large variety of flavors such as banana cream, chocolate fudge, pistachio, vanilla, French vanilla, cheesecake, pumpkin spice around the holidays, and so many more I probably don't even know about because I only get the basics here. You just add milk to ours and wisk well and set in the fridge to firm up. I have never made a British custard from a sachet but I have one in the cabinet. I picked one up at Asda for 9p and thought I'd give it a try. It may not be the exact equivalent or the best brand, but it is what I have. LOL. I should mention also the custard calls for adding boiling water and our Jello pudding mix calls for adding cold milk. Here is the breakdown of ingredients:

Asda brand Instant Custard Mix
sugar
maize starch
potato starch
whey
dried glucose syrup
vegetable oil
natural flavoring (contains wheat)
milk protein
acidity regulator
potassium phosphates
colour (annatto)

Jello Brand pudding mix -chocolate fudge
sugar
modified cornstarch
cocoa process with alkalai
disodium phosphate (for thickening)
contains less than 2% of natural and artificial flavor
tetrasodium pyrophosphate for thickening
mono and diglycerides (prevent foaming)
red 40, yellow 5, blue 1, artificial color
bha (preservative)
post #57 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by Melvira

When I was younger I used to go buy food almost every single day, just like has been mentioned. I liked just buying fresh for that night. I kept a few staples that you need of course, but I'd pick out my meat, veg, etc. fresh every day. (But still at the same old grocery store, so the food was probably sitting there for a week anyway.) I wish our country were more conducive to that, but we don't have the amazing fresh food markets that other countries have. Yes, in some places they do, unfortunately I live in the middle of the country, not in California or some big, fancy city that has 'everything'. The closest thing we have to a farmer's market is that creepy old guy that sits in his car at the bank with a bag of cauliflower on his front seat. icon_lol.gif

And yet, I live in farm country. Literally. I am surrounded by farms. I need to learn how to garden better, with my huge yard I could never go to the grocery store again. (Except for milk and cheese... I'm not keeping a cow! Hahaha!)



You crack me up! icon_lol.gif

You do bring up an excellent point and I was thinking about this as I drove around my village today, to be fair about this subject, grocery stores in America are not as convenient as they are in a small village where you can walk to all the shops etc. Our stores are very well spread out and you may drive a good 15 miles or more to get to the store, so when you do make your purchases you want to make sure you buy enough. So our needs may be different because our lifestyles are different due to the way our towns are structured.

I do wish I could garden too! I have grown veg. in pots and that was fun, but it would be more fun to have a nice plot going.
post #58 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by superdobbers

Quote:
Originally Posted by prterrell


As for fruit-flavored gelatin (which is what Jello is), I have no idea if that is something that is eaten outside the US/NA or not.



I might be wrong (please do correct me!), but US "Jello" is UK "JellY" ("jelly" I think might be the American word for the British 'Jam' [like a fruit preserve]???). Jelly (e.g. from the brand Rowntrees) is eaten lots in the UK and it's readily available at most grocery stores.

I see interesting recipes here including pudding mixes, but I haven't a CLUE what their equivalent would be in the UK. Can someone explain what it is please?

Thanks icon_smile.gif



To me at least in NY:
Jello - clear dessert that wiggles
Jam - goes on toast - seedless
Jelly - goes on toast - has seeds
Perserves - chunks of fruit, better for treats then toast

Instant pudding is like custard, made by the major brand name is Jello (not to confuse, but also the same company that makes the dessert Jello). Some instant cake boxes list 'instant pudding' included into the cake mix now for more moisture (someone finally caught on!). I don't know if you have instant custard in the UK in the same packaging sizes...but I hope that helps? I know an English family I could ask, if you need more specifics PM me.
post #59 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkisInOkinawa

.... to be fair about this subject, grocery stores in America are not as convenient as they are in a small village where you can walk to all the shops etc. Our stores are very well spread out and you may drive a good 15 miles or more to get to the store, so when you do make your purchases you want to make sure you buy enough.



We had friends from England who came and stayed a couple of weeks with us. They told us they never understood the American's fascination with their cars .... until they got here and saw how spread out everything was. THey, too, were used to EVERYTHING being in walking distance from their home. At my home, NOTHING was in walking distance!

Quote:
Quote:

To me at least in NY:
Jello - clear dessert that wiggles
Jam - goes on toast - seedless
Jelly - goes on toast - has seeds
Perserves - chunks of fruit, better for treats then toast



I think you switched a couple .... jam has seeds. Jelly does not. icon_wink.gif
post #60 of 94
I wish I could afford to spend more time in Europe. I LOVE Europe.

I don't use 95% of the convenience products in the grocery stores here in the US --- (we perimeter shop, the bulk of our purchases come from the produce section, just a few things from the middle aisles, such as cereal and coffee) and am trying to teach myself many of the "lost" or "old-fashioned" way of doing things so I don't have to rely on the mass-produced stuff. I'd keep chickens and even goats and a cow if it were legal here. Sadly, my large yard is NOT well-situated for growing veg. The best I can do is tomatoes and some herbs. --- so I seriously doubt I'd miss them (the convenience products).

I WISH we could shop here in the US the way y'all do elsewhere in the world. I HATE megamarts! I'd much rather go to the butcher's and then a few doors down to the baker and then across the street to the cheese monger, etc.

One of my main interests in baking is learning to make the traditional European cakes, tortes, and pastries. It can be frustrating at times, though, as I have to rely on the internet (including online translation for some) for recipes and some of the ingredients y'all have, we don't!

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Aaaaaand, because I'm a dork:

Jell-O: brand name belonging to U.S.-based Kraft Foods for a number of gelatin desserts, including fruit gels, puddings and no-bake cream pies. The brand's popularity has led to its becoming a generic term for gelatin dessert across the U.S. and Canada. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jell-O

Fruit Butter: made by slowly cooking fruit and sugar together until a smooth, thick "butter-like" consistency is achieved.

Fruit Curd: a dessert topping and spread usually made with lemon, lime, orange, or raspberry.[10] The basic ingredients are beaten egg yolks, sugar, fruit juice and zest which are gently cooked together until thick and then allowed to cool, forming a soft, smooth, intensely flavored spread. Some recipes also include egg whites and/or butter.

Jam: contains both fruit juice and pieces of the fruit's (or vegetable's) flesh. Properly, the term jam refers to a product made with whole fruit, cut into pieces or crushed. The fruit is heated with water and sugar to activate the pectin in the fruit. The mixture is then put into containers. Available in seeded and seedless varieties.

Conserve/Preserves: made of fruit (whole or large pieces) stewed in sugar. While some brands (namely, Smucker's) differentiate between "jam" and "preserves" (the former being smooth and composed of fruit juice and pulp while the latter is a chunky version containing whole or large intact pieces of the of the fruit).

Jelly (US): a clear fruit spread consisting of set, sweetened fruit (or vegetable) juice. Additional pectin may be added in some instances where the original fruit does not supply enough, for example with grapes.

Jelly (UK): generally used to mean a sweet dessert made by adding gelatin to fruit juice, or more commonly from commercially prepared concentrated blocks.

Marmalade: made from any of the citrus fruits, sugar, and water. Some recipes include some amount of peel and zest, which imparts a sharp, bitter taste from the bitter citrus oil.

Confit: most often applied to preservation of meats, especially poultry and pork, by cooking them in their own fat or oils and allowing the fats to set. However, the term can also refer to fruit or vegetables which have been seasoned and cooked with honey or sugar until it has reached a jam-like consistency. Savory confits, such as ones made with garlic or tomatoes, may call for a savory oil such as virgin olive oil as the preserving agent.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fruit_preserves

Chutney: a thick sauce of Indian origin that contains fruits, vinegar, sugar, and spices and is used as a condiment. http://www.answers.com/topic/chutney

Pickle: Food that has been preserved in a seasoned brine or vinegar mixture. http://www.answers.com/topic/pickle

Pudding (US): a sweet milk-based dessert similar in consistency to egg-based custards, though it may also refer other types such as bread and rice pudding. These consist of sugar, milk, and a thickening agent such as cornstarch, gelatin, eggs, rice or tapioca to create a sweet, creamy dessert.

Pudding (UK): rich, fairly homogeneous starch- or dairy-based desserts such as rice pudding and Christmas pudding, or, informally, any dessert. The word is also used for savory dishes such as Yorkshire pudding, black pudding, suet pudding, and blood pudding.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pudding

Custard: a range of preparations based on cooked milk and egg mixtures. While 'custard' may refer to a wide variety of thickened dishes, technically (and in French cookery) the word custard (crème or more precisely crème moulée) refers only to an egg-thickened custard. In the United Kingdom, 'custard' often refers to a dessert made from cornflour rather than eggs, although this is also called blancmange. UK Custard Powder is roughly the same as the US Instant Pudding Mix. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Custard


Confused yet? icon_twisted.gif
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Recipes
Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Recipes › Please write proper measurements