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Please write proper measurements - Page 2

post #16 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by lomfise

You'd be surprised how many of the things I see in recipes here on CC that are impossible to find in Denmark; coffee dreamers, instant jello, pudding mixes, strawberry flavored gelatin, strawberry flavoured cream cheese, bettercreme, shortening, pumkin puree, and all those extracts always mentioned. I can get vanilla, almond and rum extracts.



Wow. You can't get instant jello? pudding mixes? shortening? My goodness! Can you get lemon extract? Raspberry? That just makes me sad! You want us to send you a big old goody package with all the stuff we have and take for granted? icon_wink.gif
post #17 of 94
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't think pudding as we know it here in the US is really eaten outside of the the US (maybe is in Canada?).

As for fruit-flavored gelatin (which is what Jello is), I have no idea if that is something that is eaten outside the US/NA or not.

Vegetable shortening is called vegetable fat in other places (I know there is at least one brand of it in the UK and in Australia, not sure about other countries), but is still pretty uncommon, I think most of the things we use it for in the US aren't eaten or are traditionally made with other fats (butter or lard I'm guessing).

Are pumpkins and other squashes (other than zucchini/courgettes) eaten outside the Americas? Or are canned veg just not as common outside of the US?

I know a lot of what we find commonplace here in the US isn't in other places (and visa versa), but then things like sweetened condensed milk and various extracts I would think would be available in Europe. Are you able to order from online sources, such as Lorann's and have it shipped, or are the shipping costs prohibitive?

I wonder if it's easier to get things that are more common in Europe here in the US than the other way round? For example, if I want Devon (clotted) cream, there are stores here in the US that import it, but I guess other than at US military commissaries, many US food products aren't shipped overseas?
post #18 of 94
My mother often sends me recipes, which is great, but she is writing them down from her memory. So, I have a recipe for a cornbread which says "Heat oven until hot" and "bake for 20 minutes. Or 40. Check and see, when it's done take it out". Her most famous recipe was for a soup called "Hodge-Podge". I loved it as a child, but I think she must have made it up. Her recipe says: "Cook potatoes and other hard vegs. Add beans, corn, etc. Don't forget the milk."
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post #19 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by AverageMom

My mother often sends me recipes, which is great, but she is writing them down from her memory. So, I have a recipe for a cornbread which says "Heat oven until hot" and "bake for 20 minutes. Or 40. Check and see, when it's done take it out". Her most famous recipe was for a soup called "Hodge-Podge". I loved it as a child, but I think she must have made it up. Her recipe says: "Cook potatoes and other hard vegs. Add beans, corn, etc. Don't forget the milk."



Yup... that's known as a 'dump cook'. I am GREAT at that. Just pulling *whatever* out of the pantry and fridge and turning it into something really tasty! That's how much mom gives me her 'recipes'. "Take some milk... you know... 'some'." "Mix in some flour until it looks right." That sort of thing. Fortunately I've become a great translator of those types of recipes!! thumbs_up.gif
Melvira: Mistress of the dark... chocolate!

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Melvira: Mistress of the dark... chocolate!

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post #20 of 94
Well, that is my recipe.... icon_biggrin.gif I think the people that are saying there are 3 sizes of cans are thinking of evaporated milk, not sweetened condensed milk....and there is a big difference between the two.
I'm sorry I didn't think "internationally". A can of sweetened condensed milk is 14 ounces here in the States. I've never seen another size for as long as I've grocery shopped.
If I Google it, it says that 14 ounces is the equivalent of 397 grams.

My apologies. No frustration intended. That caramel is fabulous. I hope you enjoy it.

Jodie
post #21 of 94
In Australia, Condensed milk is around 390 - 400g tins. I've noticed them sneakily reducing the contents when I go to make a recipe (the cookbooks I use always give the weight).

I have to admit that I haven't tried any of the recipes on CC because I can't translate them easily. We also don't have most of the things you have. I was really excited about that gourmet flavours thread until I looked at the recipes and realised that I didn't understand half of what was in them or couldn't get my hands on the products. My cousin's new wife (a gorgeous gal from Kentucky) has also told me that you have different cup sizes for wet and dry ingredients which just further adds to my confusion.
post #22 of 94
Another reason to write the size of the can or box, like 14 oz., is that manufacturers often up and change the size of the can on you!! I have lots of recipes that call for a 15 oz. can of something or other, but now they've reduced that product to 14 oz. It may not sound like a big difference, but it can be . . . the finished recipe might be really dry.
post #23 of 94
wow..... didn't realize I'd read this and get somewhat offended. Personally, I like "semi-homemade" and I don't care to have someone tell me that it isn't cooking because I happen to use a can of condensed soup in one of my recipes. If I stand over a stove with various ingredients and put together a meal... that's cooking. I don't have time nor do I even care to spend all day cooking something completely from scratch just to have my 2 year old turn his nose up to it.
post #24 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by Melnick

My cousin's new wife (a gorgeous gal from Kentucky) has also told me that you have different cup sizes for wet and dry ingredients which just further adds to my confusion.



This is true! There are dry cup measures and liquid cup measures. I don't know the history behind it, and until I started really getting into baking, I never questioned it. It just was how it is. Then I learned that we Americans are the only ones doing it this dumb way. icon_rolleyes.gif
post #25 of 94
They are the same size measures... it's just that "dry" measuring cups you fill allll the way to the top so you can scrape off and "wet" measuring cups are more like the clear type with incremental lines that are taller than the highest line. I think the theory is that wet ingredients will meniscus (bulge) up over the top while still being contained and throw off your recipe. I use them interchangeably cause I'm a rebel like that icon_smile.gif
post #26 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by prterrell

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't think pudding as we know it here in the US is really eaten outside of the the US (maybe is in Canada?).

As for fruit-flavored gelatin (which is what Jello is), I have no idea if that is something that is eaten outside the US/NA or not. We have flavoured gelatine packets here - but they are called JELLY (which gets confusing when YOU have Peanut Butter & Jelly - which we would call JAM)
Vegetable shortening is called vegetable fat in other places (I know there is at least one brand of it in the UK and in Australia, not sure about other countries), but is still pretty uncommon, I think most of the things we use it for in the US aren't eaten or are traditionally made with other fats (butter or lard I'm guessing).

Are pumpkins and other squashes (other than zucchini/courgettes) eaten outside the Americas? Or are canned veg just not as common outside of the US? YEP!! We eat these in Australia but more as a vegetable with say a Roast dinner! AND NEVER canned!! LOL - you can't buy canned pumpkin here!

I know a lot of what we find commonplace here in the US isn't in other places (and visa versa), but then things like sweetened condensed milk and various extracts I would think would be available in Europe. Are you able to order from online sources, such as Lorann's and have it shipped, or are the shipping costs prohibitive?

I wonder if it's easier to get things that are more common in Europe here in the US than the other way round? For example, if I want Devon (clotted) cream, there are stores here in the US that import it, but I guess other than at US military commissaries, many US food products aren't shipped overseas?



Hey we have GOLDEN SYRUP!! woo hoo - makes the best caramel mudcake!

Have noticed that LOTS of US recipes contain purchased "Prepared ingredients" - we are lucky (I think) that we haven't gone down that path here yet (sure it WILL come) - most here still use raw ingredients (butter, sugar, flour eggs, milk etc) Packet mixes are NOT cost effective - they range from $4- $6 a packet and you STILL need to add eggs, butter/oil, milk !)
post #27 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by JodieF

Well, that is my recipe.... icon_biggrin.gif I think the people that are saying there are 3 sizes of cans are thinking of evaporated milk, not sweetened condensed milk....and there is a big difference between the two.



Nope, I have at least 2 sizes of the sweetened condensed! icon_lol.gif But oh yah, BIG difference in those two. Blech, would not be good to use the evap when it calls for sweet-cond!! icon_razz.gif
Melvira: Mistress of the dark... chocolate!

Well that's just great. Peanut butter in my crack.
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Melvira: Mistress of the dark... chocolate!

Well that's just great. Peanut butter in my crack.
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post #28 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by ApplegumKitchen

Have noticed that LOTS of US recipes contain purchased "Prepared ingredients" - we are lucky (I think) that we haven't gone down that path here yet (sure it WILL come) - most here still use raw ingredients (butter, sugar, flour eggs, milk etc) Packet mixes are NOT cost effective - they range from $4- $6 a packet and you STILL need to add eggs, butter/oil, milk !)



Yes, sadly, people think anything that involves mixing a couple packets and cans of stuff together and heating it up = cooking. A friend of mine actually thinks sticking a Stouffer's lasagna in the oven is "cooking". Unfortunatley, real cooking seems to be something most people in this country don't do anymore.

Yes, I AM a food snob and darned proud of it, too!
post #29 of 94
Hey, there have been plenty of times I WISHED they'd have just used a Stouffer's lasagna!! icon_wink.gif
Melvira: Mistress of the dark... chocolate!

Well that's just great. Peanut butter in my crack.
Reply
Melvira: Mistress of the dark... chocolate!

Well that's just great. Peanut butter in my crack.
Reply
post #30 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by Melvira

Hey, there have been plenty of times I WISHED they'd have just used a Stouffer's lasagna!! icon_wink.gif



icon_lol.gif sad, but true! icon_rolleyes.gif
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