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Cover a dummy cake with royal icing?

post #1 of 35
Thread Starter 
What is the best way to cover a dummy cake with royal icing? What is the best consistancy for the icing? I am getting very frustrated trying to get the icing smooth because it dries so fast. I usually just pull the icing off the styrofoam.
"who says you can't have your cake and eat it too?"
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"who says you can't have your cake and eat it too?"
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post #2 of 35
A little confused here.....are you "icing" your cake with royal? I've only used royal for piping accents or cookies. I will interested in the answers for the knowledge of new information. Sorry I couldn't help.
Debbie - US Army (Retired) --aka "The Cake Sarge"

Good Cake Ain't Cheap! Cheap Cake Ain't Good!
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Debbie - US Army (Retired) --aka "The Cake Sarge"

Good Cake Ain't Cheap! Cheap Cake Ain't Good!
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post #3 of 35
Thread Starter 
Yes, I am icing the dummy cake with roryal icing. I am making several dummy cakes for my first bridal show. I didn't want them all to be covered in fondant. I wanted two cakes to have the look of buttercream icing, but solid so if people touch the cakes they won't mess up the icing. Is there a different icing I should be using?
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post #4 of 35
They actually make something that looks like buttercream for dummy cakes. Its called Permaice I think. It dries hard also. Usually places that sell the dummys carry it. Im not sure Global Sugar Art does, but you can check.
When I cover my dummys in fondant, I put RI on it first. I make it rather thick because if you use it when its too wet, it will slide off of it. I dont think the RI will give you the effect your looking for though because BC and RI dry differently, or atleast from my experience. I can look at a BC cake and a RI cake and know the difference.
post #5 of 35
Thread Starter 
Thanks Weirkd!! That is exactly what I am looking for. Can I use any type of coloring on it?
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post #6 of 35
probly dont need this now, but Il give it just incase.

I recently covererd and decorated a dummy entirely with royal icing. The recipe as follows:

1 tablespoon of meri white (10g)
90ml Water (5 tablespoons approx)
1lb Icing Sugar (500g)
1 tablespoon of Glycerine

Mix the meri white and water together until dissolved. Add icing sugar gradually mixing with a wooden spoon, and the glycerine and carry on mixing untill the icing stands up in soft peaks and ia a bright white colour.

If using an electric mixer beat on slow speed for 5 mins or until the icing stands in soft peaks.

That is the recipe i used for the covering of the cake, was a good consistency and dried nice and hard although go slowly adding the icing sugar sometimes you dont need all of it, you kind of have to judge it a bit. I covered it with a side scraper and straight edge.

For decoration including the butterfly runouts I used a STRONG icing recipe. Have that recipe if you would like it? See my pics, the daisy/butterfly cake is the one I am talking about.

Lou
post #7 of 35
I ice all of my dummies in BC. No vanilla, no dream whip. It hardens like concrete. I pick them up from the sides, they've traveled to numerous shows, and I tell everyone, "Sure! Go ahead! You can touch them!"

Never had a need to use RI for anything cake.
post #8 of 35
Several points:

Permaice is very expensive. You color it with acrylic craft paints, so another added expense.

The recipe for RI to ice a cake with is different than the one you use for cookies or accents. The one posted above is excellent. The consistency is that of a thick soup. You put on thin layers, sand out rough spots, and repeat, allowing complete drying between each layer. It's a pain the butt and I'll never do it again.

Indydeb is right--for a true buttercream look, the basic Wilton class recipe without adding any flavorings, milk, creamer, etc. works wonders. Left for a few days, it does dry like concrete. It should be kept away from heat or direct sunlight.

Rae
I love you, but your emergency is not my crisis!

They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
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I love you, but your emergency is not my crisis!

They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
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post #9 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by cai0311

What is the best way to cover a dummy cake with royal icing? What is the best consistancy for the icing? I am getting very frustrated trying to get the icing smooth because it dries so fast. I usually just pull the icing off the styrofoam.



Covering dummies with RI used to be done to create displays that would last for many years... it still is a good option if you don't want to use fondant. I preferred to use a RI made with real egg whites/powdered sugar. The consistancy is creamier, less likely to break down and it is much cheaper to make. Ice that styro just like any other cake, spatula method.. Use a spray bottle of water to keep it damp (light mist). When done, let it air dry completely. When dry, you can use a sheet of fine sand paper to give it a smooth finish. hth
They will remember the quality long after they've forgotten the price..
..the philosophy of my beloved pastry professor..
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They will remember the quality long after they've forgotten the price..
..the philosophy of my beloved pastry professor..
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post #10 of 35
My BC covered dummies have been sitting around for years. It holds up.
post #11 of 35
indydebi, can you reccomend a good buttercream recipe? For filling and decorating? There are so many different ones its hard to know what one to use. I have only just started trying out the stuff and don't know whats good and whats not. icon_confused.gif

Lou
post #12 of 35
well, I'm a little biased, here, but this one has gotten some good reviews! icon_rolleyes.gif
http://cakecentral.com/recipes/6992/indydebis-crisco-based-buttercream-icing
post #13 of 35
I just asked about this yesterday... I wish I had seen this then...
Linda
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Linda
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post #14 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddaigle

A little confused here.....are you "icing" your cake with royal? I've only used royal for piping accents or cookies. I will interested in the answers for the knowledge of new information. Sorry I couldn't help.



I know it's a odd concept here in the US but royal icing is very commonly used in countries like the UK, Australia and South Africa to ice cakes. I'd say it's much more widely used than buttercream.
post #15 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

I ice all of my dummies in BC. No vanilla, no dream whip. It hardens like concrete. I pick them up from the sides, they've traveled to numerous shows, and I tell everyone, "Sure! Go ahead! You can touch them!"

Never had a need to use RI for anything cake.



IndyDebi ~ so just the Crisco and the powdered sugar? I have been asked to ice a huge dummy sheet cake for our local theatre and I've never decorated one before. I haven't used RI since my first Wilton class and am much more comfortable with your butter cream icing. This dummy cake has to last a few weeks through several shows (it is brought out at the end of the play) ...
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