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I'm never selling a cake again! (long rant alert!) - Page 3

post #31 of 148
The daughter who accepted the cake clearly loved it, and thought that her sister would as well! Perhaps she dropped it on the floor, who knows really? So sorry this is happening to you, it's terrible that your first paying customer is hard to deal with. icon_sad.gif

I always use a cake box and a sturdy board. It doesn't seem to matter too much if the box is a bit flimsy but my boards are good. If the box is not tall enough for the cake, I glue cardboard lengths inside so that they are taller than the cake, then I wrap in saran wrap and sometimes a garbage bag on top of that if the cake needs to be hidden from somebody's eyes (I always let the orderer peek before hiding with a garbage bag). The cake really should be protected from dust, sand, snow, leaves, flies, pet fur, rain, whatever you may encounter as you move a cake from one place to another!!
Katherine
_______________
Slowly but Surely with the support of all Chunky Monkeys!
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Katherine
_______________
Slowly but Surely with the support of all Chunky Monkeys!
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post #32 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas_Rose

Quote:
Originally Posted by CarolAnn

Cake boxes are cheap and more professional looking than a cake in a cardboard box with plastic over it. Cakes should always go out in a clean closed container, even if it's just going across the street.



Not trying to jack the thread, but all of the cake boxes I have encountered were really flimsy and/or not tall enough. Most of the time I use a brand new moving box cut to size and then tape waxed paper over the top, because the cake boxes I've bought just don't seem strong enough. These are the ones from the craft store or walmart, would the ones at the cake decorating supply shop be stronger?



Absolutely! When I have to use the boxes and boards from walmart I tape 3 boards together so that they don't bend in the middle and I have to use tape just to keep the boxes held together at the tabs. When I use the ones from my cake supply store, I only have to use 1 board and the tabs fit together snugly and they are much more sturdy. They are actually cheaper at the supply store as well.
A person's a person, no matter how small.
-Dr. Seuss
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A person's a person, no matter how small.
-Dr. Seuss
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post #33 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by jen9936

Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas_Rose

Quote:
Originally Posted by CarolAnn

Cake boxes are cheap and more professional looking than a cake in a cardboard box with plastic over it. Cakes should always go out in a clean closed container, even if it's just going across the street.



Not trying to jack the thread, but all of the cake boxes I have encountered were really flimsy and/or not tall enough. Most of the time I use a brand new moving box cut to size and then tape waxed paper over the top, because the cake boxes I've bought just don't seem strong enough. These are the ones from the craft store or walmart, would the ones at the cake decorating supply shop be stronger?



Absolutely! When I have to use the boxes and boards from walmart I tape 3 boards together so that they don't bend in the middle and I have to use tape just to keep the boxes held together at the tabs. When I use the ones from my cake supply store, I only have to use 1 board and the tabs fit together snugly and they are much more sturdy. They are actually cheaper at the supply store as well.



That's great to know, thanks!
post #34 of 148
The only other thing I'm wondering is if the "cracked" portion of the cake might be where the star points are attached...? We'll never know, of course, without her sending you a picture, but that might be plausible. If, as another poster speculated, the cake was moved about, it could very well have caused a crack in those places... and if you had any lettering there that too could have been compromised.

Again, sorry about this happening to you.
1 Chronicles 23:29
They were in charge of the bread set out on the table, the flour for the grain offerings, the unleavened wafers, the baking and the mixing, and all measurements of quantity and size.
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1 Chronicles 23:29
They were in charge of the bread set out on the table, the flour for the grain offerings, the unleavened wafers, the baking and the mixing, and all measurements of quantity and size.
Reply
post #35 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas_Rose

I just can't believe that someone would send you an email like that, it's one of the rudest emails I have ever seen.

Is it possible that her kids were picking up the cake and carrying it around to show each other? I could imagine kids doing that, and maybe someone almost dropping the cake or setting it down half on top of something, and then not wanting to tell their mom that they had damaged it (seeing as she is one scary woman), so saying it arrived that way. What kind of board was it on?



That's is exactly what I have been thinking reading through this entire thread! Many of the cake's I have done have gotten damaged after delivery by children, thankfully, for all but one so far I was there to see it and I always have my emergency repair kit on me! This is very very unfortunate. Please don't give up the love of your confections for this. Take the lessons learned and be sure to implement them next time! I had to learn lessons recently as well. I did a wedding cake that was enough to feed about 400 and so far I've only recieved $50 as payment.

On the packaging note, if you don't normally sell them, no one can expect you to have a proper box on hand. I have yet to deliver a single cake in a box. Seriously! But, you may take the extra precaution and run out to WalMart, they've got them for sale individually in their craft department. I don't think you needed to do any more though for a $40 cake! keep your head up and keep on cakin'! icon_biggrin.gif
post #36 of 148
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Quote:

The only other thing I'm wondering is if the "cracked" portion of the cake might be where the star points are attached



I thought that is probably where it cracked too, but again, it was not cracked when I delivered. The lettering, however, is on a portion that is not pieced together, so that wouldn't be it.

I also want to mention that I'm not going to give up making cakes, I'm just not sure that I will sell anymore, especially to someone I don't know.

She still hasn't emailed me back, so I'm wondering if she will. I'm sure if she does, it will be by tonight, and I'll be sure to keep you all posted.
post #37 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pookie59

Personally, for a kid's birthday I would not use the wedding cake serving size as a guideline. Consequently, I think an 8" cake is way too small for 20 people. She was likely expecting to be able to serve a healthy wedge to each child rather than a tiny dessert size piece. (With my relatives, if I tried to serve a wedding size piece of cake at a family birthday, they'd think I was nuts. They expect a good size piece and probably want seconds.



...and we wonder why we have fat kids. When my children were small I used to serve big pieces of cake to the kids at their parties. Invariably, I threw away half a slice of cake on nearly every plate. It was just too much cake for most of them. A serving of 1 x 2 x 4" is more than ample for kids. And even if it's not, it's really all they need.
It's not good enough that we do our best; sometimes we have to do what's required.

Winston Churchill
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It's not good enough that we do our best; sometimes we have to do what's required.

Winston Churchill
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post #38 of 148
I have read thru the previous responses and I think there is a lot of great advice offered. I have to say from my perspective though as a caker but also a mom that if you are taking the responsibility of taking payment for your cakes, as opposed to just practicing your craft and giving them to friends and family then I think there is a level of responsibility to deliver them professionally which would include a box, not only for delivery purposes but also so the client can store it safely until the event. I also think that since the mom was the one ultimately paying for the cake you can't really gauge the satisfaction by a 16 year old's reaction as they won't necessarily have the same critical eye as a grown parent would.
With that being said though ultimately I think it is a lesson learned and hopefully you can move forward and continue to love doing cakes. If dealing with this type of persnickety client is not for you then maybe just continue as a hobby as unfortunately there are a lot of these high maintanence customers out there.
post #39 of 148
Quote:
Quote:

Is it possible that her kids were picking up the cake and carrying it around to show each other? I could imagine kids doing that, and maybe someone almost dropping the cake or setting it down half on top of something, and then not wanting to tell their mom that they had damaged it (seeing as she is one scary woman), so saying it arrived that way. What kind of board was it on?

[/quote]

This is my bet!!!
I'm sure we all heard " I didn't do it " When the kid is sitting beside it icing on fingers and face...true story in my house!!!
And I am one ugly scary mom when you touch my cakes, HAHAHA!
May your layers be many and your frosting be thick! - Stampin Up
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May your layers be many and your frosting be thick! - Stampin Up
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post #40 of 148
Honest to Pete, the part of her e-mail that put me into hysterics was where she wrote that she'd pray for you and the situation. How is praying going to affect this? Does she have such a direct connection to the gods that they are going to send down Jesus and the apostles and the BVM and Thor and Krishna and Buddha to slap you up and then magically fix the cake?


I'd like to see a pic of the original and then a pic of your version. I agree about delivering a cake not properly packaged. I am a HUGE advocate of proper packaging. I get so grossed out when I read about folks here who deliver cakes and just put them in the back of their cars. Uck. That is so unsanitary and unprofessional. No cake leaves my shop unboxed. Ever.
post #41 of 148
You can also buy cake boxes and boards in bulk at Sams Club for a VERY good price. The boxes are extremely sturdy and end up costing about 50% less than Wilton boxes and boards. I really think that if you plan on SELLING your product, you need to box your cakes in food-safe packaging. It's unsanitary and unprofessional to send a cake out without proper packaging.
post #42 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefjulie

You can also buy cake boxes and boards in bulk at Sams Club for a VERY good price. The boxes are extremely sturdy and end up costing about 50% less than Wilton boxes and boards. I really think that if you plan on SELLING your product, you need to box your cakes in food-safe packaging. It's unsanitary and unprofessional to send a cake out without proper packaging.



I think that depends upon who you are and what your cakes are like. I myself have yet to find "professional" boxes that work with my cakes. My cakes are always covered some way some how while traveling. I don't worry about packaging for storage because all of my confections are delivered on site when the 'event' is to begin. 99% of my cakes are custom, carved and tall.

I find it quite offensive how many cc'ers here are putting down those who don't spend the money on 'professional' looking boxes that would have to be altered anyhow just to fit the cake.
post #43 of 148
Actually even as a hobbiest, most of the cakes i make don't fit in boxes, they're the wrong size..too tall etc. I find it very frustrating to try and find a box that worksicon_smile.gif Mostly I end up "making a box" taping it up and open and then covering it with press n seal or saran but I hate having to do it.
Visit me at www.keeponcaking.com for tutorials and other cake stuff.
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Visit me at www.keeponcaking.com for tutorials and other cake stuff.
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post #44 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Onceuponadreamcakes

I have read thru the previous responses and I think there is a lot of great advice offered. I have to say from my perspective though as a caker but also a mom that if you are taking the responsibility of taking payment for your cakes, as opposed to just practicing your craft and giving them to friends and family then I think there is a level of responsibility to deliver them professionally which would include a box, not only for delivery purposes but also so the client can store it safely until the event. I also think that since the mom was the one ultimately paying for the cake you can't really gauge the satisfaction by a 16 year old's reaction as they won't necessarily have the same critical eye as a grown parent would.
With that being said though ultimately I think it is a lesson learned and hopefully you can move forward and continue to love doing cakes. If dealing with this type of persnickety client is not for you then maybe just continue as a hobby as unfortunately there are a lot of these high maintanence customers out there.



These were my thoughts exactly.

Snocilla- what type of board was the star cake on? I noticed in your gallery that many of your cakes are on a cardboard cake board. Sometimes you'll have to use a double or triple thickness of these boards and cover them together as one for added stability. Just a thought.
post #45 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by DakotaDesigns

Quote:
Originally Posted by chefjulie

You can also buy cake boxes and boards in bulk at Sams Club for a VERY good price. The boxes are extremely sturdy and end up costing about 50% less than Wilton boxes and boards. I really think that if you plan on SELLING your product, you need to box your cakes in food-safe packaging. It's unsanitary and unprofessional to send a cake out without proper packaging.



I think that depends upon who you are and what your cakes are like. I myself have yet to find "professional" boxes that work with my cakes. My cakes are always covered some way some how while traveling. I don't worry about packaging for storage because all of my confections are delivered on site when the 'event' is to begin. 99% of my cakes are custom, carved and tall.

I find it quite offensive how many cc'ers here are putting down those who don't spend the money on 'professional' looking boxes that would have to be altered anyhow just to fit the cake.



I actually wasnt trying to be offensive in any way, shape, or form. It's CYA thing. I would be disgusted if something like a bug or who knows what ended up one of my cakes because it wasnt properly covered. If you look through my cakes, I also dont do many cakes (sheet cakes) that have "standard" size boxes, BUT I do have cake boxes that I purchased online that are MADE for my tiered/ taller cakes. It's actually NOT a matter of cost, since I reuse the same boxes over and over again- Just a matter of running a business and following health department guidelines.
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