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If ganache does not harden, how is it used b/w layers?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
I am confused....If ganache does not harden, how are you able to put ganache between the layers of a cake without the layers just sinking into each other?
Also, I thought I saw somewhere about covering ganache with BC. Wouldn't the BC just fall right off the ganache layer?
And ganache ON TOP of BC.....that wouldn't work, either...would it?

Searching around but not finding answers.....any thoughts/experiences are greatly appreciated!

----ultimate goal here is to make a multi layer wicked chocolate cake for a chocolate-lover friend's birthday-----he wanted ganache------
post #2 of 16
When people say it doesn't harden, they mean it doesn't set like a candy bar. It does get very firm, like stiff buttercream. If you've ever eaten a chocoalte truffle from a chocolatier, ganache is the traditional filling.
post #3 of 16
If you use a 2:1 ratio (2 parts choco, 1 part cream), then it will harden. Not like a candy bar, as the PP said, but enough to create a "shell" of sorts if you use it as a crumb coat or a filling.

A 1:1 ratio will make a smooth, soft, fudgey ganache that would be more for piping
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post #4 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thank you...Everyone ehre is so helpful!.....starting to wrap my head around this.....

Does the ganache need to be in the fridge?

How long will it take from making it to the time when it will get to the consistency that it can hold up between layers?

Also, once it thickens as you say, CAN it hold buttercream?

thanks again!
post #5 of 16
Make up the 2:1 ratio, cover with plastic wrap, and let set in a cool space overnight. The next day, spread it between layers much like you would peanut butter. Let your layers settle and then buttercream your cake.

What's going to happen is that the ganache will harden up. You can use an off-set spatula to scrape any oozing that settled around the edges before buttercreaming.

HTH

Paul
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post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 
That does help....sometimes I need things spelled out just that directly...sorry!! LOL....

Thank you all!!! Very excited to put this together!
post #7 of 16
if you're wanting a ganache "shell" on the outside, or want to ice it in ganache, you don't need to put BC on first.

also, ganache doesn't need to be put in the fridge, but you could to cool it down quicker.
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post #8 of 16
and you may need to warm the 2:1 ratio *slightly* in the microwave in order to get it to spread easily. Otherwise, it may tear at your cake and really pick up some crumbs.

I usually put it in the microwave at 5-second intervals so it's still fairly thick, but I can stir it easily
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post #9 of 16
there is no reason why you would need to use b/c with ganash. Ganash is a filling/crumbcoat/ and full coat all on its own. im not keen on the combo of butter/chocolate/cream, i thin its just too sickly, i say stick to one or the other
post #10 of 16
This is all really helpful to me....But what about whipped ganache. I've tried it a couple of times and have not had much luck. It has been difficult to spread. One recipe said to whip it 30 seconds. Am I going too long when it is crumbly?
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post #11 of 16
When you ask "ganache between the layers of a cake without the layers just sinking into each other", do you mean in lieu of using a support board between, say, a 2 layer tiered cake? If so, then this is not possible. Now ganache can be used if you wish to torte a cake and use it as the filling.
post #12 of 16
Whipped Ganache has more like a 2 parts cream to 1 part chocolate. If it got grainy, you whipped it too long. The good part is that it is easy to fix. (According to Martha Stewart, I have never tried.) If you take your grainy ganache and warm it again you will get rid of the grainy-ness. When it cools again you can try whipping it again. If you whipped it to the point that the cream became butter like, I would imagine it won't work though.
post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmchao

When you ask "ganache between the layers of a cake without the layers just sinking into each other", do you mean in lieu of using a support board between, say, a 2 layer tiered cake? If so, then this is not possible. Now ganache can be used if you wish to torte a cake and use it as the filling.



I do mean if I torte the cake and put it between layers....not between tiers....still learning the lingo! icon_smile.gif
post #14 of 16

My question is... can i put a ribbon around the cake after the ganache is set?

post #15 of 16

Yes you can put a ribbon around it.  When the ganache ratio is correct and the ganache is set, you can touch it and chocolate will not come off on your fingers.  The only exception is if it's too hot or the cream to chocolate ratio is too high.  I found this tutuorial to be very helpful with using ganache.  http://www.threelittleblackbirds.com/2012/10/simply-ganache-a-tutorial/#more-4028

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