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How do you get "clean" looking fondant? - Page 2

post #16 of 32
Does anyone know about Fondarific fondant. Just stumbled on it on a website and it looks pretty interesting, being flavored and all. Also do you know how long it lasts if it is opened.
post #17 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

well, I'm the fondant newbie around here but I'll share what I've encountered.

Cornstarch comes off of fondant easier than p.sugar. With either of them, I use a clean kitchen towel to wipe down the fondant when I'm done rolling it. I do the wipe-down before I put it on the cake.

I think getting mine smooth looking is more luck than skill! icon_eek.gif I'll step back and let the real fondant experts share their die-hard tips and tricks! thumbs_up.gif



I have an airbrush, I use everclear and spray the cake when I am done decorating. This removes all the residue from powdered sugar or cornstarch and it is very quick!! Every once in a while I brush it off first then spray, I do this only when there is a lot of powder! If I am going to spray shimmer on it, I do the everclear first. The reason I use everclear is because it dries faster than vodka...Just don't let it pool or it will leave a "stain"
post #18 of 32
I wanted to say too that there are tricks...alot of times you can hide a little wrinkle or a crack or a seam with a stripe or some other planned design you are putting on your cake.

Remember that a camera can hide alot as well...you work on your cake with your eyes 6 inches away from it for hours, so you know every little mistake and lump and air bubble and whatever else...but once its all put together and photographed, alot of that goes away. I have a few photos in my gallery that people have complemented my fondant but I can still see ripples or other imperfections in it!

I would have to say practice makes perfect of course.....but then the untrained eye of the customer and the smaller size of a photograph do wonders to make what we think is an "okay cake" an awesome one! thumbs_up.gif

By the way...if you ever want to feel really good about yourself...pick up a bridal magazine and look at the cakes. Now, in a "cake book" you find alot of absolutely perfect dummy cakes. But in a bridal book...you find real cakes and you can usually find imperfections in them! Bubbles in the buttercream or an uneven fondant stripe or something.

Of course I was at a bridal show in March and it was also a competition...I did my Irish tiered cake...and I ended up trying to get it done in time, so I did not spend as long on my detailing as I should have. Everybody was going past and one girl got real close and inspected it....and said, to a friend, right in front of me real loud, "Wow! You know, they say if you look close even the good cakes have imperfections and this one has a ton! Look at that!" haha. icon_redface.gif
post #19 of 32
does the ganache coat instead of crusted buttercream help with the fondant being "squishy" and bumpy?
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post #20 of 32
I have tried the sample of Fondarific and think they taste amazing. Haven't used them very much, but can't wait to. The times that I have used the Fondarific it was very easy to work with and didn't dry out too bad. I really like it so far.
post #21 of 32
Thread Starter 
chouxchoux, the ganache does set up almost hard. Better than crusting buttercream - in my opinion. It must be completely set though. And I haven't had any problems with it being squishy or bumpy. You get rid of the bumps with a hot knife once it has set. This smooths out any ridges or bumps.
post #22 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by meri1028

chouxchoux, the ganache does set up almost hard. Better than crusting buttercream - in my opinion. It must be completely set though. And I haven't had any problems with it being squishy or bumpy. You get rid of the bumps with a hot knife once it has set. This smooths out any ridges or bumps.

I know I'm coming in half way on this post, but when you talk about using the hot knife to smooth out the bumps, is this with fondant or just butter cream. I had a problem with the buttercream filling bumping out through the fondant.
post #23 of 32
emcm 51- Thanks for sharing that video from youtube. It was very helpful. I think it will make applying fondant a lot easier.
post #24 of 32
No worries, Cabecakes!
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Beautiful cakes are made with eggs not egos

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Beautiful cakes are made with eggs not egos

My website: www.sugarandslicecakes.com
My Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/?ref=logo#/pages/Sugar-and-Slice-Cakes/153424644414?ref=nf
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post #25 of 32
If you are using ganache you can put on a layer much thicker than a crumb coat. Put your cake on a board slightly larger than the cake (eg. use an 8 inch masonite board under a cake baked in an 8 inch pan and the board is slightly larger than the cake), coat the outside with a thick layer of ganache coming out further than the board then use a metal scraper (heated up in hot water then dried) to butt up to the board and scrape around to remove the excess. Your cake can be any old shape under there but the ganache will be perfectly straight and sharp and it sets solid after a couple of hours.

Check out the Planet Cake book for the full method - well worth getting if you are into fondant and ganache!
post #26 of 32
If you are using ganache you can put on a layer much thicker than a crumb coat. Put your cake on a board slightly larger than the cake (eg. use an 8 inch masonite board under a cake baked in an 8 inch pan and the board is slightly larger than the cake), coat the outside with a thick layer of ganache coming out further than the board then use a metal scraper (heated up in hot water then dried) to butt up to the board and scrape around to remove the excess. Your cake can be any old shape under there but the ganache will be perfectly straight and sharp and it sets solid after a couple of hours.

Check out the Planet Cake book for the full method - well worth getting if you are into fondant and ganache!
post #27 of 32
Thread Starter 
Barb1959, just as Bunsen said. You basically heat a knife or metal scraper in boiling water and use it to smooth our the ganache after your thick layer of of it has set. I highly recommend the Planet Cake book!!
post #28 of 32
I only use Fondarific fondant. The texture is very buttery and not matte like say Wilton is. The Buttercream is AWESOME and the fruit flavors taste just like starbursts. I only use the fruit flavors for accents as they have a pretty strong flavor. I have heard that the melon flavor is great as a cake covering. Chocolate tastes just like tootsie rolls. You can get samples of 5 flavors sent to you for just the cost of shipping. The ladies that run the company have earned my business. They have allways been there to help with any issues and run thier business the way people used to. Another tip, you really cannot use it for flowers or bows that need to stand up. This fondnat stays soft and will not get hard. That is not an issue for me because I would not use my yummy fondant for the decorations that most likely will not be eaten anyway. I hope this helps.
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post #29 of 32
beeboos...thanks for this info...where do you buy this fondant? i'd really like to try it. thanks!!!
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post #30 of 32
For clarification re "overhead projection" acetate...when you are shopping for this product, the correct name to ask for is "transparency" - any office supply store should have these.
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