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Why Does My Fondant Sag & Start to Bubble?

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
i AM EXPERIENCED WITH FONDANT AND MOST OF MY CAKES COME OUT FINE, except THERE ARE A FEW TIMES WHEN after i FONDANT A CAKE, A FEW HOURS LATER, EVEN THE NEXT DAY THE FONDANT STARTS TO SAG, LIKE EXTRA SKIN. I DONT KNOW WHY THIS HAPPENS ESPECIALLY WHEN I FIRST PUT IT ON IT WAS NOT LIKE THAT. HAS THIS HAPPENED TO ANYONE ELSE? ANY SUGGESTIONS?
post #2 of 24
This just happened to me yesterday. I posted today a few posts back ..."why do I suck at fondant" if you want to check it out!!!! Good luck.
post #3 of 24
I am not sure why this is happening to you, but maybe your fondant is not sticking properly. Do you spritz it with a little water or anything like that first?
post #4 of 24
I spritzed!! I am at a loss. i will be trying the mmf!! icon_smile.gif
post #5 of 24
What kind of fondant are you using?
Edna icon_smile.gif
Visit my website.. www.designmeacake.com
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Thanks Edna
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Visit my website.. www.designmeacake.com
http://designmeacakeblog.blogspot.com/
Check my Gumpaste Tutorials in You tube
http://www.youtube.com/user/tonedna1
Check my new Blooms and Vines DVD!



Thanks Edna
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post #6 of 24
"like extra skin"

your cake has entered "middle age"

it's the same reason you're going to (if you haven't already) SAG as you get older:

GRAVITY

it wins every time.

-----

some things that help:

1) let cake completely settle before putting on the fondant so that there is little to no sagging due to settling after the fondant's on

2) roll out fondant thinner so there is less to sag

3) put less BC under the fondant so there is less that can squish and shift as gravity does it's thing.

4) use a stiff (the stiffer the better) BC so it shifts less due to weight of fondant

5) cover cakes just with base layer of fondant. Let gravity win. Give cake a "fondant lift" by trimming off excess and then add finishing touches.

-----

it's not nice to fight with Mother Nature -- she ALWAYS wins!
Keep on cakin'!
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Keep on cakin'!
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post #7 of 24
what about those littlew bubbles that seem to appear out of no where
be kind.
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be kind.
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post #8 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug

"like extra skin"

your cake has entered "middle age"

it's the same reason you're going to (if you haven't already) SAG as you get older:

GRAVITY

it wins every time.

-----

some things that help:

1) let cake completely settle before putting on the fondant so that there is little to no sagging due to settling after the fondant's on

2) roll out fondant thinner so there is less to sag

3) put less BC under the fondant so there is less that can squish and shift as gravity does it's thing.

4) use a stiff (the stiffer the better) BC so it shifts less due to weight of fondant

5) cover cakes just with base layer of fondant. Let gravity win. Give cake a "fondant lift" by trimming off excess and then add finishing touches.

-----

it's not nice to fight with Mother Nature -- she ALWAYS wins!



soo..I should give up the gravity fight!... icon_cry.gif never! icon_lol.gif
Edna icon_smile.gif
Visit my website.. www.designmeacake.com
http://designmeacakeblog.blogspot.com/
Check my Gumpaste Tutorials in You tube
http://www.youtube.com/user/tonedna1
Check my new Blooms and Vines DVD!



Thanks Edna
Reply
Visit my website.. www.designmeacake.com
http://designmeacakeblog.blogspot.com/
Check my Gumpaste Tutorials in You tube
http://www.youtube.com/user/tonedna1
Check my new Blooms and Vines DVD!



Thanks Edna
Reply
post #9 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by chouxchoux

what about those littlew bubbles that seem to appear out of no where



aka "cake farts"

didn't settle long enough to release the air trapped between the layers when torted and filled.

cakes still cold when fondant put on. Air inside cake still cold. Cold air takes up less space. Cake warms, air expands, cake farts!
Keep on cakin'!
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Keep on cakin'!
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post #10 of 24
Then why do people say to fondant a cold cake...or to flash freeze them? I did both...one in july which I left out on the table all night, then put fondant on (not cold). Then one yesterday that was in the fridge!! They both sagged. WHAHHHHHH. Do you use all shortening buttercream? I want to practice, but when my tiers are not stacked, they are fine. If I make a 3 tier cake for practice, it will be expensive. I guess I have to practice anyway.....maybe with smaller cakes!!! Thanks!
post #11 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug

Quote:
Originally Posted by chouxchoux

what about those littlew bubbles that seem to appear out of no where



aka "cake farts"

didn't settle long enough to release the air trapped between the layers when torted and filled.

cakes still cold when fondant put on. Air inside cake still cold. Cold air takes up less space. Cake warms, air expands, cake farts!



Aaaaahhhhh Doug you make me laugh!
"When choosing between two evils, I always like to try the one I've never tried before." Mae West.
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"When choosing between two evils, I always like to try the one I've never tried before." Mae West.
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post #12 of 24
Try chocolate ganache under your fondant instead of buttercream. It is less 'smooshy' and is MUCH firmer. Then mix 50/50 apricot jam with boiling water to create a syrup (Planet cake recipe), which you brush over the ganache once it's set. The fondant sticks to it instantly... can't be squished... and won't go anywhere. Tastes way better too!
post #13 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bel_Anne

Try chocolate ganache under your fondant instead of buttercream. It is less 'smooshy' and is MUCH firmer. Then mix 50/50 apricot jam with boiling water to create a syrup (Planet cake recipe), which you brush over the ganache once it's set. The fondant sticks to it instantly... can't be squished... and won't go anywhere. Tastes way better too!



This sounds yummy think I will give it a go icon_smile.gif
Life is not measured by the breaths you take, but by the moments that take your breath away ...
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Life is not measured by the breaths you take, but by the moments that take your breath away ...
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post #14 of 24
Just make sure your dark chocolate ganache is a ratio of 50/50 cream/chocolate. And your white chocolate is 2 parts chocolate 1 part cream. It won't work if it's too thin... or thick. You have to bring the cream to a boil first, then mix it in the chocolate.... leave it to set to a peanut butter consistency then spread on (same way as buttercream). Once it hardens (it will set quite firm), then use a knife dipped in boiling water to create a perfect finish. I was lost before I found this method. It's BRILLIANT. I know a few have raved about it... because it ROCKS. It's like covering a dummy cake. I learnt the method of this site and am now telling everyone I know! icon_smile.gif
post #15 of 24
Thread Starter 
i use satin ice fondant. how thick should the buttercreme on the cake be?
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