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PVC Pipe

post #1 of 69
Thread Starter 
Does anyone know where to buy food-grade pvc pipe for modeling cakes like they do on the cake shows?

Any guidance is appreciated. Thanks. icon_lol.gif
post #2 of 69
I would like to know that also.

I didn't think they made food safe PVC pipe. I thought that everyone bought the standard kind at the hardware store and just washed it. Also what diameter is best as I see so many times on the cake shows that they roll their fondant onto the rolling pin/PVC pipe (after they have rolled out the fondant) to transfer it to the cake.

Does anyone do this and what are the secrets of doing this vs. picking it up with your hands and arms and transferring it. Does this work better - less stretching or tears in the fondant? Does the PVC pipe work better for rollingo ut the fondant than a rolling pin since you can get it in longer lengths or is the fact that there is no weight to it hinder the rolling process and makes it much more difficult to roll?
post #3 of 69
the pvc used to bring DRINKING water into a house is food safe, after all you are drinking the water.

so just look for PVC made for use as drinking water SUPPLY

(not waste removal, aka sewer, gray water, etc.)
Keep on cakin'!
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Keep on cakin'!
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post #4 of 69
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug

the pvc used to bring DRINKING water into a house is food safe, after all you are drinking the water.

so just look for PVC made for use as drinking water SUPPLY

(not waste removal, aka sewer, gray water, etc.)

Thank you Doug. That makes perfect sense.
post #5 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peridot

I see so many times on the cake shows that they roll their fondant onto the rolling pin/PVC pipe (after they have rolled out the fondant) to transfer it to the cake... what are the secrets of doing this vs. picking it up with your hands and arms and transferring it. Does this work better - less stretching or tears in the fondant?



This is pretty much classic technique for transferring any type of rolled out dough (moving fondant onto the cake, movie pie crust to the pie plate, etc). As you said, it helps prevent stretching and tearing of the dough and you can easily carry it across a room this way without much worry.
Tara
<---wonders if anyone uses REAL ingredients anymore--sugar fruit nuts, cream, butter etc--instead of flavoring chemical cream from a bucket with pudding & jello and calling it "mousse"
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Tara
<---wonders if anyone uses REAL ingredients anymore--sugar fruit nuts, cream, butter etc--instead of flavoring chemical cream from a bucket with pudding & jello and calling it "mousse"
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post #6 of 69
I've kind of thought about this too, like on Cake BOss he rolls out a mile long stretch of something on his electric roller and they just stick a rolling pin at the end and it "loads itself" onto the pin. Very neat.

Doug....good point about the drinking water PVC.
You don't HAVE a soul, you ARE a soul...you HAVE a body. C.S. Lewis
I'd rather see badly done cake than well done styrofoam.
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You don't HAVE a soul, you ARE a soul...you HAVE a body. C.S. Lewis
I'd rather see badly done cake than well done styrofoam.
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post #7 of 69
Doug's right on - pvc is used in your house for water.

I use 3 different sizes of pvc for rolling pins. I have the 2 1/2" (diameter) size cut pretty long for rolling out fondant to cover a cake. I have a small one, like 1" that I use for gumpaste and small fondant work. Then I have one about 1 1/2" that I use for rolling out stars and other fondant decorations. It's works pretty well for me and I can get whatever size rolling pin I need.
post #8 of 69
I just got back from ICES 09 and the question came up regarding "food safe PVC pipes" and Doug is correct WATER PVC pipe is perfectly safe.

"The Two Sweet Sisters" who will be on TLC ..use it all the time.
It is better to try and fail, then fail to try.
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It is better to try and fail, then fail to try.
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post #9 of 69
Tracycakes & Pink Ziab,

Tracycakes,
I am very interested in doing this PVC rolling pin thing. How long is the 2 1/2 inch piece that you use to roll the fondant? Do you find that it is harder to roll a large piece with the PVC because the weight is not there like a heavy rolling pin?

What I hate about my rolling pin is the length - I have a Silpin and it's great - fondant doesn't stick to it but I always get the marks in the fondant from the edge and that is frustrating. So I am thinking that I need the PVC pipe and that will take care of the problem.

PinkZiab,
Do I need to dust my fondant with powdered sugar as I am rolling it up on the PVC pipe? I am wondering if it will stick to itself and not unroll properly.

AND drinking water PVC pipe only!!!

Thanks.
post #10 of 69
I roll the fondant out with my heavy rolling pin and then use my 36" piece of PVC pipe to transfer it to a large cake.
post #11 of 69
The one thing Wilton's did come out with that has never given me a problem is their large plastic rolling pin. It has rounded ends so there is no markings made. I always roll my fondant up on it to go lay on my cakes. Never a problem.
post #12 of 69
The wilton pin is fine for anything less than a 14" diameter cake. Anything larger and I use the 36 " PVC pipe.
post #13 of 69
You can also 'round' the ends of the PVC pipe with sand paper/power sanders etc. This will make it easier to roll out without any marks on the fondant/gumpaste. I used the power sander first to round off the edge, then used a very fine paper to finish with hand sanding.
post #14 of 69
Aren't you breaking the coating when you sand it? I can see how you could keep it from contacting the food if it's larger than the fondant, though.

I can also see how the inside would be safe, but what about the outside? Are there any special coatings on the outside to make it last longer or something? Are we sure the ink doesn't seep into it so that the chemical is in there even though visible traces are gone?
post #15 of 69
I'd like to know to.
No child of God sins to that degree as to make himself incapable of forgiveness.
John Bunyan
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No child of God sins to that degree as to make himself incapable of forgiveness.
John Bunyan
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