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Before & After (or the effect outlining has on a cookie)

post #1 of 184
Thread Starter 
I've been getting a lot of PM's asking me how I go about decorating my cookies. I know a lot of people outline, then flood with a thinner icing. I use one consistency of icing to decorate the entire cookie, then go back and outline as the last step (with a thickened icing). I use a #1s tip to do all my outlining.

I was talking with a couple other decorators about how so many of my cookies look pretty unimpressive until the final outlining is finished. bakinccc encouraged me to do a "before" and "after" picture so that others could see the difference and maybe decide to take their cookies to the next level by adding more detail.

So here's a photo of my latest cookie, one without the outlining, and the other totally completed. The difference isn't quite as pronounced as it was with my gnome cookies. I was sure they were going to be a flop, but by the time the outlining was done, they weren't half bad!
LL
The pessimist complains about the wind;
the optimist expects it to change;
the realist adjusts the sails.
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The pessimist complains about the wind;
the optimist expects it to change;
the realist adjusts the sails.
Reply
post #2 of 184
Many thanks for posting your pictures. Wow - the outlining really make a difference (sort of like using eyeliner, ha, ha). I really appreciate the tip. I recently made some cookies for a wedding and used Toba's icing but after outlining in white and then the flooding I noticed a color variation which I didn't like. Now I know that I can outline in a contrasting color for effect. Thanks again.
post #3 of 184
what a difference! thanks for taking the time to share your method! thumbs_up.gif
post #4 of 184
Thanks for sharing that with us, that's really cool to be able to look at it that way. They look too goodicon_smile.gif
post #5 of 184
Really does make a big difference! BTW very cute cookies! icon_biggrin.gif
post #6 of 184
Thanks for sharing that, your cookies look great.
post #7 of 184
how do you keep the icing from running off the cookie? your flood must be thin enough to spread and mine is usually unruly at that consistency so i have the outline or dam (in same color) to hold it on the cookie. i'd love to be able to use one consistency for the base colors.

thanks!
diane
Diane
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Diane
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post #8 of 184
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by drakegore

how do you keep the icing from running off the cookie? your flood must be thin enough to spread and mine is usually unruly at that consistency so i have the outline or dam (in same color) to hold it on the cookie. i'd love to be able to use one consistency for the base colors.

thanks!
diane



Diane,

It's the consistency of white school glue, or a bit thicker. I outline the area I want to ice (#4 for larger areas, #2 for smaller) and then fill in with more icing in a zig zag pattern. There's still quite a bit of "naked" cookie showing. I then use a tapered off-set spatula to smooth the icing over the entire area. I rarely have a problem with icing dripping off the edge, or being too thick to smooth out nicely. I'll attach an example...hope it works!
LL
The pessimist complains about the wind;
the optimist expects it to change;
the realist adjusts the sails.
Reply
The pessimist complains about the wind;
the optimist expects it to change;
the realist adjusts the sails.
Reply
post #9 of 184
thanks for sharing this! I often wonder if I should outline my cookies - I like the effect, but usually feel like I mes it up when I outline becuase I don't have a very steady hand...

by the way - you mentioned you use a tip 1s for outlining. Would you mind sharing what brand/manufacturer makes that tip?

thanks!

Bonnie
post #10 of 184
Gemini, what a great way to show the difference all that detail makes - love those pictures!

And may I just say your cookies ROCK! I was looking through your photos and realized I have several in my favorites. You do absolutely fantastic work!!

Julie
"Mmmmmmmmm donuts." - Homer Simpson
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"Mmmmmmmmm donuts." - Homer Simpson
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post #11 of 184
Thank you for sharing your tips! I love the info and I now have something new to try. Thank you, thank you!
post #12 of 184
Just curiosity....The icing can be any type of RI or do you have a specific one that works better for you?
post #13 of 184
Thank you for sharing your technique!

Do you need to let one color dry before adding another color next to it?

~ Kim
post #14 of 184
Thanks for sharing your tips!!
post #15 of 184
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugartforyou

Just curiosity....The icing can be any type of RI or do you have a specific one that works better for you?



I'm assuming you could use RI. I use the following:

3 cups powdered sugar (sifted)
3 Tablespoons skim milk (you can use water or other type milk)
3 Tablespoons corn syrup
15 drops brite white food color, optional (I use Americolor brand)

Mix the milk and corn syrup into the powdered sugar until well combined (I use a bowl and a spoon). Add the brite white and mix well. The brite white helps prevent the icing from getting cloudy and spotty, though I only had that problem when I refrigerated the decorated cookies. At this point, I play with the icing until I get the consistency I want, which is similar to white school glue. To thicken, add more powdered sugar. To thin, and more corn syrup. Divide and color.

For the final outlining icing, I add more powdered sugar until the icing is the consistency of peanut butter.

bonniebakes, I'll look when I get home to see if there is a brand name on the #1s tip.
The pessimist complains about the wind;
the optimist expects it to change;
the realist adjusts the sails.
Reply
The pessimist complains about the wind;
the optimist expects it to change;
the realist adjusts the sails.
Reply
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