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Never using BC again under fondant - Page 5

post #61 of 505
dogluvr spakle is just BC with cake crumbs mixed in. I made van BC and had devils food choc cake crumbs so it was like cookies and cream flavored and wowwie it was good. It doesn't crust(just incase that is the next question.) icon_biggrin.gif
¢¾Sarah
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¢¾Sarah
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post #62 of 505
I have been doing this with my fondant-covered cakes since I started decorating and it never fails. I don't always fill the cakes with the ganache either. I torte and fill with whatever filling suits the cake flavour then ice with a complementing ganache before covering with fondant.

I also purchased the Planet Cake book the day it was released here in Oz and felt even better about the method when I read that they were doing the same thing.
post #63 of 505
What ratio do you all use for semi-sweet and for bittersweet ganache? Also, has anyone tried this on a carved cake? I'm wondering how well this would smooth around intentional bumps and dips.
post #64 of 505
I used it on a carved cake - it works really well especially if you whip it. I'm not sure about the apricot preserve thing - I know you can use it - but I think it's also to help make the cake moist. You don't need to use it though. The ganache will go on fine without it. You do need to spray it lightly (or brush) with water before you put the fondant on so that the fondant has something to bond with.
post #65 of 505
Isn't using apricot preserves an expensive way to do something that water also accomplishes?
~ Sherri
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~ Sherri
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post #66 of 505
Melnick, the water-thinned apricot preserves is suggested to be brushed over the ganache to help the fondant stick. It would replace the water spray.

I used simple syrup before but have tried preseves too since buying the Planet Cake book.
post #67 of 505
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cakepro

Isn't using apricot preserves an expensive way to do something that water also accomplishes?



Maybe, but as a British expat, I'm used to brushing my fruit cakes with it before marzipanning them, so it's no biggy for me! The cakes are now all fondanted, and they look lovely. I just hope it all goes together tomorrow without a hitch!
AKA: bonjovibabe
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AKA: bonjovibabe
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post #68 of 505
bonjovibabe,
you are probably very busy lady now (decorating and answering Q), but you put a big bug in my head. I will try to limit my Q, and this should be hopefully last one
I don't want to use fondant over - so I was thinking why not pour the ganache over the cake instead of spreading with a spatula, I should have a smoother finish, is this Ganache pourable? Then I was going to put it in the fridge, and dowel and stack 3 tier. Now, my cake will be done in August - might be hot, will the white ganache kind of melt in the room, and the cake plates stick to the cake when stacked (it might look ugly when they put the cake apart). Just what do you think about all this? Maybe that's why they (and you) are putting the fondant over, to prevent this?????
post #69 of 505
I know this may sound dumb, but how badly would dark chocolate ganache show through if you put white fondant on top? Has any one ever tried it?
post #70 of 505
I am guessing grannies black slip under her cream chiffon dress.
¢¾Sarah
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¢¾Sarah
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post #71 of 505
icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif
post #72 of 505
jensenscakes,

I have. Take a look at the white cake with pink cut-out flowers and "Anne" on top in my pictures and judge for yourself. Also the White cake with pale green booties on top.
post #73 of 505
Hello - Need help desperately! I am supposed to be making a cake for a 90th birthday this weekend and would really like to try using ganache. Currently we are facing high 90s. Is it still safe to use ganache? The one local bakery that I have found that has used ganache says they wouldn't risk it. What do you think? Obviously, my house is not 90 + degrees, but it will have to sit outside during the party...
Also, anyone have a terrific filling that needs no refrigeration? Chocolate and white cakes are the flavors.
post #74 of 505
You got me craving.. I am making 8" white ganache right now. I made the ganache this morning, and plan to spread over my cake at evening. It looks yellowish... I am not sure if I understood correctly, should I whip the ganache before spread over cake, or use just like it is (melted and rested)???? Also I am need to refrigerate the cake, as I am using Bavarian creme filling. Somebody mentioned not to refrigerate before covering with fondant. The cake needs to be refrigerated all the time? Can you help???
post #75 of 505
Quote:
Originally Posted by jensenscakes

I know this may sound dumb, but how badly would dark chocolate ganache show through if you put white fondant on top? Has any one ever tried it?



ALL the time! and NO it never shows - using ganache under fondant is fairly standard here in Australia - most decoraters do it

Do you realise that Planet Cake roll their fondant as thin as 1/8inch ?

Don't confuuse this SETTING ganache with the "pouring" style of ganache - it will NOT work - the ratios explained earlier need to be adhered to in order for it to set. ie. 2 parts dark choc to 1 part cream OR 3parts white chocolate to 1 part cream

Our cream is pouring cream and is 35% fat - try to get a cream with NO gelatine added.

Ganache is put onto cakes in a similar fashion to Sugarshack's buttercream - once it is melted and combined it must be allowed to set to a spreadable consistency!! Use the straight sided benchscraper to get nice straight sides. Ours set up overnight - air-con room 21'C
The ganache once set should be dry to the touch and you should not be able to leave a fingerprint on it - should be FIRM.

So glad to see ganache taking off over there - it really makes for a much nicer cake!! but do remember to adjust your pricing matrix - oh AND don't skimp on the quality of the chocolate !!! Use good quality couverture like Callebaut - the cheaper compound chocolates contain high water content and can produce less than desirable results AS WELL as inferior taste!!
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