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Never using BC again under fondant - Page 26

post #376 of 505
mrsmudrash - I just did a test run and made a batch of choc ganache with 16 oz of chocolate and it made a little over 3 cups of ganache and I was able to fill and coat a 6 inch square , 4 inch tall layer. It was torted and it used all of the ganache.

For all of you who have used this technique, what texture should the ganache be once it is cooled. I've tried it twice. First time I used bakers semi-sweet chocolate and followed the instructions by weight and it was really solid the next day after it had cooled. If I put my finger on top of the ganache and pushed it did not give at all.

The second patch I made I used chips (I know weaker than bakers chocolate) and it does give a little. Which is the expected texture of the ganache after it has cooled over night?

Thanks so much. I really loved working with the ganache. The test cake was a success so I plan on using this pretty often I just want to know which texture is correct for the set ganache.

Thanks!
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post #377 of 505
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeRowesHunny

Quote:
Originally Posted by ZlatkaT

bonjovibabe
you said for you cake (10,8,6) you used 1.5 kg w.chocolate+500 ml cream. Would you give me a eye advice : for my cake 14,10,8 should I use the same amount - just for crumb coat covering, not filling.



I didn't use it to fill the cakes, I have whipped dark chocolate ganache with cointreau in one, limoncello infused lemon SMBC in another and kahlua infused tiramisu SMBC in the other! I have some ganache (about 1 1/2 cups) left over, so you probably could manage with the same amount for your cakes.

To simple baker - no it doesn't have to be refridgerated once on the cakes. I never put my fondant cakes in the fridge. Think fresh cream truffles (essentially ganache!), they are fine at room temp for a good week, so what's the difference with ganache on a cake?!



doesnt the smbc have to be refrigerated?
post #378 of 505
Fantastic tutorial on how to ganache a cake, for anyone interested:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/34971289@N06/4036229617/in/set-72157622644499988/

Hope it helps!
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post #379 of 505
Any brands of chocolate, especially white chocolate that you guys prefer to use?

I don't have much of a choice in my grocery stores out here.

Thanks.
post #380 of 505
Great info - Thanks!
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post #381 of 505
Thanks for the link! icon_biggrin.gif
post #382 of 505
SMBC is whipped eggwhites and butter. It can be at room temp for several days, as butter could be, and will be fine. It won't hold at higher temps or for a much longer time, however....
post #383 of 505
Quote:
Originally Posted by luddroth

SMBC is whipped eggwhites and butter. It can be at room temp for several days, as butter could be, and will be fine. It won't hold at higher temps or for a much longer time, however....



Ok is this from a decorating standpoint (holding up without melting) or from a food safety standpoint? I use smbc but I always refrigerate after decorating (yes even fondant) Even the colette peters recipe in cakes to dream on says only leave at room temp for one day , refrig. for up to a week.
post #384 of 505
Hey guys I've just tried white choc ganache on a cake ( whole cake was an experiment - made cake flour from scratch then did scratch White cake then first time with ganache) I just loved working with it and the edges it gives are to die for - probably my most professional looking but I found the taste way too sweet. I started off with a 3:1 ratio but it set rock solid so I had to add more cream and had a 2:1 ratio by the time it was workable at room temp - I'm in Scotland so I'm not exactly battling heat here. The choc I used was the best stuff I could get rather than high quality so illtry this again with different choc also I probably had it a little too thick but was just having so much fun lol. Definately one to keep tinkering with x
post #385 of 505
I recently made a cake with ganache under the fondant and LOVED it! I found the ganache MUCH easier to work with and tastier too!

My only issue is that the fondant got very hard. The butercream underneath generally keeps it soft, but the ganache was enough to do that. My sister-in-law told me that they chipped the fondant off! Anything I can do to avoid this?

TIA
post #386 of 505
I have been having SUCH a problem with my fondant buckling and cracking!! I just did a wedding cake for my niece and just about had a nervous breakdown because of that problem. Also it rained like crazy and there was 95% humidity, so my magnolias wouldn't dry. Ended up having to poke the petals right into the cake! I would love to not have this problem again! (I'm very much an amateur and only do cakes for family)
post #387 of 505
Quote:
Originally Posted by leahk

I recently made a cake with ganache under the fondant and LOVED it! I found the ganache MUCH easier to work with and tastier too!

My only issue is that the fondant got very hard. The butercream underneath generally keeps it soft, but the ganache wasn't enough to do that. My sister-in-law told me that they chipped the fondant off! Anything I can do to avoid this?

TIA



edited to fix my mistake!
post #388 of 505
How do you suggest people to cut this pretty solid ganache cake? I heard that you can cut the cake nice and clean with a warm knife (dip in hot water and wipe clean). But most people at the party place don't even know how to cut the cake properly. I saw them once cutting the cake with plastic knife icon_eek.gif, poor cake, it look sooo ugly on the plate.
post #389 of 505
Just get them to cut the cake as normal - in my case for normal read indydebi's method- my ganache wasn't really hard rather it was firm like fondant if you know what I mean and it cut without any problem- I did White choc with a 2:1 ratio because the 3:1 ratio turned out solid so if your ganache was really hard then maybe you need to add more cream next time.
HTH

Ps oh and tell them to use a decent knife lol
post #390 of 505
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeRowesHunny

thanks to Planet Cake! I LOVE their work and was very excited to get their new book. I didn't realise that they use ganache under their fondant and not buttercream, and now I know why! I am making a wedding cake for Friday and today have filled and crumbcoated the cakes. I have used white chocolate ganache as a crumbcoat (hmmm, actually a bit thicker than that as you can't see the underlying cake!), as I will be covering the cake in ivory fondant. OMG - the cakes look so good already - like I have already put the fondant on! They have set up so beautifully that I know there will be no problems with bulges or air-pockets when I do the fondant tomorrow - those cakes are going nowhere! Plus I'm sure it will be far more delicious than buttercream too! Anyway, just thought that I'd say how much I recommend this method! This cake has to be perfect as the cakes themselves are very plain (just a diamante buckle & ribbon around the centre of each cake), and it will be part of a wedding that will be featured in a bridal magazine (I am so scared!). Wish me luck thumbs_up.gif !


im still reading this post but running out of time, i need to fill and crumbcoat my brothers wedding cake by tuesday icon_redface.gif iv ordered this book but its delayed and wont be here in time, what i need is a complete walkthrough of this if anyone can help, e.g, exactly what white or milk chocolate to use, do you whip it for filling the cakes and leave it at spreading consistancy for crumbcoating, also how do you melt the chocolate, other sites say heat the cream and pour it over your broken chocolate to melt it but this never works for me the cream cools before it melts it all and ends up lumpy and not glossy. ive failed every attempt at ganache so far but really want to do this for this cake icon_cry.gif can anyone help or email me the ganache page of the book thumbs_up.gif sorry for bein cheeky but im getting desperate now, thanks icon_smile.gif
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