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Never using BC again under fondant - Page 24

post #346 of 505
In addition to cake decorating, I am a hobby chocolatier -- I make molded and filled chocolates using tempered chocolate for the shells. The most common fillings are flavored ganaches. Reading this thread, I don't see why you couldn't flavor the ganache used under the fondant in the same way it's done for truffles and filled chocolates. You can infuse the cream: add flavoring to the cream as it is heated and let it sit with the flavoring until it cools, strain out any solids and reheat to pour over the chocolate. You can use fruit peels, lavender, cloves, cinnamon, expresso powder, malted milk powder, etc. in this way. Or, to the finished ganache, you can add liquers: Grand Marnier, Kaluha, Kirsch, Framboise. You can beat in pastes: peanut butter, almond, hazelnut. And for cakes, I often beat in a little jam: seedless raspberry, strawberry. As long as you don't add so much that it thins out the ganache, which would defeat the purpose of using it under fondant, I don't know why it wouldn't be great to use the flavored ganaches with cake.
post #347 of 505
lots of great info!
post #348 of 505
Quote:
Originally Posted by luddroth

In addition to cake decorating, I am a hobby chocolatier -- I make molded and filled chocolates using tempered chocolate for the shells. The most common fillings are flavored ganaches. Reading this thread, I don't see why you couldn't flavor the ganache used under the fondant in the same way it's done for truffles and filled chocolates. You can infuse the cream: add flavoring to the cream as it is heated and let it sit with the flavoring until it cools, strain out any solids and reheat to pour over the chocolate. You can use fruit peels, lavender, cloves, cinnamon, expresso powder, malted milk powder, etc. in this way. Or, to the finished ganache, you can add liquers: Grand Marnier, Kaluha, Kirsch, Framboise. You can beat in pastes: peanut butter, almond, hazelnut. And for cakes, I often beat in a little jam: seedless raspberry, strawberry. As long as you don't add so much that it thins out the ganache, which would defeat the purpose of using it under fondant, I don't know why it wouldn't be great to use the flavored ganaches with cake.



Thanks for all the pointers! Its ironic you made this post because I am planning to make some chocolate cuppies with chocolate mint ganache. I have the mint candy flavoring. Do I just add the flavoring to the cream or to the ganache as if making truffles. I made truffles once, several years ago, and added Grand Marnier and coffee at the same time I added the cream. Did I do it right? TIA
Darlita
Die-Hard Scratch Baker

Time...and baking heals all wounds.
Your only competition should be yourself.
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Darlita
Die-Hard Scratch Baker

Time...and baking heals all wounds.
Your only competition should be yourself.
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post #349 of 505
I make peppermint ganache by adding the extract after the cream has melted the chocolate -- if you're using butter or corn syrup, add it at the same time. Heat tends to dissipate extracts and alcohols, so it's better to add it later rather than heating it with the cream. Anything solid (herbs, spices) that should be strained out would go in the cream and be allowed to infuse. Same for something that should be dissolved: expresso powder, malt powder. HTH
post #350 of 505
Thank you, luddroth icon_biggrin.gif
Darlita
Die-Hard Scratch Baker

Time...and baking heals all wounds.
Your only competition should be yourself.
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Darlita
Die-Hard Scratch Baker

Time...and baking heals all wounds.
Your only competition should be yourself.
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post #351 of 505
How much ganache does it take to cover a cake?

I am making a 2-layer 8x8 square which will be 4 inches tall.

Many thanks.
Celebrate life every day with family and friends.
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Celebrate life every day with family and friends.
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post #352 of 505
I filled and covered 8 and 12 inch rounds, both 2 layers, with white chocolate ganache. I used 16 oz. cream to 48 oz. chocolate. It was barely enough to get by. I would have done better with 20 oz. cream and 60 oz. white chocolate.

For just covering, not filling, an 8 inch round, 2 layers, I use 12 oz. cream and 36 oz. white chocolate, but I had enough left to fill if I had wanted to, but I would have run close had I torted and filled.

I would think the 12/36 would work, but I would personally go the extra and do the 16/48, especially if you torte and/or fill.

HTH.
No good deed goes unpunished...
the greater the deed,
the greater the punishement.
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No good deed goes unpunished...
the greater the deed,
the greater the punishement.
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post #353 of 505
I cant wait to try this! icon_smile.gif BC is really too sweet and fattening. i love ganache!!!
Such a joy seeing something good has come out of the oven.
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Such a joy seeing something good has come out of the oven.
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post #354 of 505
i have some questions icon_smile.gif

1. will the ganache melt under the fondant?
2. how long should I sit my cake covered with ganache in the fridge?

TIA guys!
Xoxo

* Im making it right now! I cant wait!!! icon_smile.gif
Such a joy seeing something good has come out of the oven.
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Such a joy seeing something good has come out of the oven.
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post #355 of 505
Meegh - What is Michele Foster's fondant? Is that someone on CC or is it something I can google? Also is making the chocolate ganache the same as white chocolate as far as the proportions. What chocolate do you recommend? Can you use the chocolate melts you get at AC moore or Michael's I am a newbie.
post #356 of 505
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barb1959

Meegh - What is Michele Foster's fondant? Is that someone on CC or is it something I can google? Also is making the chocolate ganache the same as white chocolate as far as the proportions. What chocolate do you recommend? Can you use the chocolate melts you get at AC moore or Michael's I am a newbie.



Hello and welcome!

Michele one of the many famous decorators here on CC. She has shared her recipe for fondant with us. Here is the link to her recipe.

http://cakecentral.com/recipes/7446/michele-fosters-fondant

For making ganache, you can a 2:1 (chocolate:cream) ratio for regular chocolate and 3:1 (white choc:cream) ratio. I wouldn't use candy melts for ganache if I were you (nothing personal against candy melts). I use Ghiardelli Bittersweet choc or Ghirdelli White Choc.

HTH icon_smile.gif
Darlita
Die-Hard Scratch Baker

Time...and baking heals all wounds.
Your only competition should be yourself.
Reply
Darlita
Die-Hard Scratch Baker

Time...and baking heals all wounds.
Your only competition should be yourself.
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post #357 of 505
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lita829

I wouldn't use candy melts for ganache if I were you (nothing personal against candy melts).



icon_lol.gif Oh I'll say it! Candy melts do NOT ganache make! Sorry! (bit of a chocolate snob here. I can live with it. icon_cool.gif
post #358 of 505
Wow, I have a headache after all that reading but great info.
post #359 of 505
I definitely want to try this!

A quick question though- one of the posters said to refrigerate the fondant after applying it to the cake for about an hour to let it harden. Another said you have to leave it out for 12 hours to let it harden and that refrigerating it causes condensation to form on the fondant. Another suggested letting it sit out for a few hours.

Which is it- refrigerate or not? If not, is 12 hours really necessary? That seems like a hugely long time and really increases the amount of time I would have to prep in advance for each cake.

Thanks for any help!
post #360 of 505
Quote:
Originally Posted by tguegirl

I definitely want to try this!

A quick question though- one of the posters said to refrigerate the fondant after applying it to the cake for about an hour to let it harden. Another said you have to leave it out for 12 hours to let it harden and that refrigerating it causes condensation to form on the fondant. Another suggested letting it sit out for a few hours.

Which is it- refrigerate or not? If not, is 12 hours really necessary? That seems like a hugely long time and really increases the amount of time I would have to prep in advance for each cake.

Thanks for any help!



Hello,
I highly recommend sugar schack DVD she explains step by step on how to do this. she recommends to leave the cake over night after you apply the ganache.
thumbs_up.gif good luck
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