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Covering dummy cake with fondant - Page 2

post #16 of 34
I've never used Wilton. It doesn't dry out too bad? Maybe I will use it then - I always get coupons from Michaels.
post #17 of 34
I too use Wilton fondant for all of my dummies. All of the chemicals really make it easier to work with when you're experimenting. icon_wink.gif

I always spray my dummies with a little bit of water and have never had a problem with the fondant not sticking.

When I'm ready to take the fondant off, it comes off really easily. I just use my small offset spatula to gently pry the fondant away from the dummy and once it gets started it just peels right off!

I've never used piping gel or shortening - mainly because I don't want to have to clean anything off of the dummy later!
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I has a sad. I can has cake?
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post #18 of 34
txcupcake, thanks for the reassurement. I am going to use wilton then. I can't wait to start my cake dummy!
post #19 of 34
Yes, Wilton is great for covering dummies with! Cant eat the stuff so you have to use it for something!!! (great for cakeboards also).
Bigcatz, when your applying your fondant to the dummy, you can take a small amount of crisco and put it on the edges before you smooth and it will help also with the tearing.
I like using Satin Ice for my cakes, especially if I dont have time to make my own. If you want to try a good recipe that works really well I suggest using Michelle Fosters fondant recipe on here. Also, a great tasting one is Jennifer Dontz's. Its not posted on here but you can get it off her video. She uses white chocolate in with her fondant and it gives it a great taste along with pliability. (sorry for the spelling. havent finished my first cup of coffee yet!!)
post #20 of 34
Where was this topic before I started covering all of my dummies and using my good Satin Ice?! icon_cry.gif

I had some problems with bubbles, ripping, tearing etc on one dummy and had decided that I no longer knew how to roll out fondant. I ended up coloring more fondant and using it and it worked better. I covered 1 tier with piping gel and the other 2, I just misted, yes Indydebi, "misted" my cakes with water and they all stuck just fine. icon_wink.gif I like the idea of Crisco and wished I had used it instead.

I know that some people like to elevate their cakes when applying fondant to help get wrinkles out but it seemed that the fondant tore easier and the wrinkles were worse. I went back to just putting in on the counter.

No offense Debi! You had me cracking up with that mental image. icon_lol.gif I washed some styrofoam squares that I was using for a wedding cake and I couldn't believe how much water was in them! I kept drying and drying. I laid them out and seeped water. Guess I should have washed them a few days ahead of time. icon_redface.gif
post #21 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by weirkd

Yes, Wilton is great for covering dummies with! Cant eat the stuff so you have to use it for something!!! (great for cakeboards also).
Bigcatz, when your applying your fondant to the dummy, you can take a small amount of crisco and put it on the edges before you smooth and it will help also with the tearing.
I like using for my cakes, especially if I dont have time to make my own. If you want to try a good recipe that works really well I suggest using Michelle Fosters fondant recipe on here. Also, a great tasting one is Jennifer Dontz's. Its not posted on here but you can get it off her video. She uses white chocolate in with her fondant and it gives it a great taste along with pliability. (sorry for the spelling. havent finished my first cup of coffee yet!!)



Thanks for the help! I will try the crisco on the edges and see if that helps, if not I will just keep trying until I get it! Definitely going to invest in the contoured dummies.
post #22 of 34
I dont buy the contoured ones and I seldom have ripping problems. I also make sure that I get rid of the sharp edge. I use an emery board on the edge and it helps. Also the crisco trick!
I think the best thing to do is to make sure you have your fondant rolled out to a good size, then flare it out on the bottom so that your fondant doesnt get any creases. Then once it looks like a poodle skirt you can use the side of your hand to chop it down to the bottom of the dummy. Then go ahead and start using your smoother on the top and sides. Cut some of the excess while its on the table. It also helps to use a piece of the non-skid stuff that you use for carpets. It helps to keep the dummy from moving around. I will then put my dummy on my turntable so I can see the bottom better and be able to smooth anything I couldnt see before.
post #23 of 34
You can get the "sharp" edgs of the dummies by gently rolling that edge on a hard surface, OR you can use an iron and a piece of wax paper - just be careful! (put the wax paper on the styrofoam and carefully "iron") - it will make it nice and smooth.
Knowledge is a candle that when shared, doubles the light, but the insecure person believes knowledge is a candle that is diminished when it is split between two wicks.
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Knowledge is a candle that when shared, doubles the light, but the insecure person believes knowledge is a candle that is diminished when it is split between two wicks.
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post #24 of 34
Awesome! Thanks, Loucinda!
post #25 of 34
How far in advance can you cover a dummy/styro cake?
post #26 of 34
As far in advance as you want. Some people have fondant covered dummies on display for years!

If you're going to use an impression mat or something, you'll want to use it right after you apply the fondant, while it's still soft.
I has a sad. I can has cake?
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I has a sad. I can has cake?
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post #27 of 34
Resurrecting this topic just a bit, hope you don't mind. I'm about to cover some dummies in fondant, will see how it turns out. My question is: how do you attach dummies together once they are covered?
Thanks, P
post #28 of 34
Dallas Foam has awesome prices and they are so sweet. dallas-foam.com I have ordered from them a few times and just love them. They are like .85 a piece and shipping is minimal. As far as the misting goes, though, does it mold? I know we live in humid central in South Texas and I iced the dummy before, like a dummy, and it wound up molding, even after I cleaned it. Had to throw it away.
post #29 of 34
Hello,
I will be working on my first dummy cake today, its a 3 tiers superheros birthday cake and the down tier is 12 inch round cake
I found the advices here very helpful, as i dont have piping gel im going to use crisco all over the styrofoam..

Wish me luck !
~ Nora ~
Chemistry in Kitchen ? Baking cakes...
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~ Nora ~
Chemistry in Kitchen ? Baking cakes...
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post #30 of 34

Any tip on making the dummie cake last longer or dust free? Im going to display 3 cakes outside for an expo, im expecting dirt and dust in the air also finger prints and i really like to display does cakes in my store...how to make the dust free? i have allready made the cakes but im trying to find a way to preserve them. Thanks!

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