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Experimenting w/ a RI+BC combo?

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
Has anybody ever done this? I am wondering if I cut down on the butter amount and add MP to harden it if it would flop or be OK. I just love them both for different reasons and would love to combine them somehow.
post #2 of 28
royal icing breaks down in bc, so really you'd just be adding more sugar to bc :/
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post #3 of 28
mmm....why do you want to combine them? What do you hope to get out of it? Would you use it for flowers, or icing? What qualities are you hoping will carry over from each?

I have never tried it, but would love to know what the end result would be...
post #4 of 28
Thread Starter 
Hhmmmmm......

Is it the difference in milk or water used to thin? Or does the MP do something to the butter? Because the only difference I can see is that there is milk instead of water in BC, and MP in RI and not in BC. OMG, I just confused myself!!!

And what do you mean by break down? Does it seperate or get curdled or oily? I'm just having a hard time picturing it I guess.
post #5 of 28
it's the grease in bc that breaks it down. ri is just sugar, water, and mp really. what it does is just makes it a liquid mess when it touches bc. if you're looking for super hard decorations, the ri will never set up if it's mixed with bc.
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post #6 of 28
Thread Starter 
Whispering, we must have posted at the same time!

I want the butter taste without using artificial butter "flavor" and the hardness of the RI.

I also wonder if for flooding purposes the butter would somehow mess up the smoothness or "flow?"

It just seems like there should be a way to do this, unless it's chemically impossible.
post #7 of 28
I have used the meringue powder buttercream off of the karen's cookies websitet has worked well for me on cookies. It dries hard enough to touch and stack, but still tastes good. I don't know what you are looking to accomplish with this combo, but maybe it will work.
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But stamping and scrapbooking supplies online!
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post #8 of 28
Thread Starter 
lasidus, what would happen then if I made a buttercream, added MP and more milk to thin? Would it harden? I really just want a RI that tastes like BC.
post #9 of 28
it should crust over that way i believe, but it will still be soft underneath the crust *which to me, is a good thing icon_razz.gif*
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post #10 of 28
Thread Starter 
OMG teasmom! That is exactly what I am looking for! If I just Google that name will the website pop up?

I just basically want a BC that won't be as fragile to the touch for stacking or leaning them up against each other in a display case.

Do you flood with that recipe?
post #11 of 28
Now that Lasidus mentions it, I remember one of my wilton books talking about making sure your mixing bowl didn't have any shortening on it when you start.

It probably has something to do with the fat from the shortening surrounding the sugar so not as much water can be absorbed. Just guessing.

You might just be stuck using some kind of flavoring...
post #12 of 28
Here is the recipe from Karen's Cookies. I too have been looking for something that works like RI but taste like Toba's Glace. I hope this is it!

Meringue Powder Buttercream
1/3 cup water
3 T. meringue powder
1/2 cup shortening
5 1/2 cups powdered sugar
1 tsp. vanilla extract (use clear vanilla if you want a pure white icing)
1/4 tsp. almond extract

Beat water and meringue powder until stiff peaks form. Add shortening, sugar, and extracts and whip for 3 minutes. Store well covered.

Note: I have had a lot of problems with tiny lumps in this icing, which prompted me to experiment to see if I could eliminate the problem. My theory is that the lumps were being caused by the meringue powder mixing with the water and then drying on the sides of the bowl. So, what I came up with is this:

Sift half of the powdered sugar with the meringue powder, and place in the bowl of a large mixer. Turn on mixer (use whip attachment) and, while mixing the sugar, slowly stream in the water. Let it mix, until everything is incorporated. Avoid scraping the bowl down if you can. When stiff peaks form, add flavorings and mix well. Then add remaining powdered sugar and shortening and whip for 2-3 minutes more. Hopefully you will have a lovely, lump-free icing!
post #13 of 28
www.karenscookies.net

It's been awhile, I don't know if you can thin it down enough to flood with it or not.
But stamping and scrapbooking supplies online!
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But stamping and scrapbooking supplies online!
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post #14 of 28
What Karen says about her recipe. I am going to try it on my Vday cookies.


"Meringue Powder Buttercream:
This is a cross between royal icing and regular buttercream. It has meringue powder so that it dries well, but it also has shortening in it, so it remains soft on the inside and doesn't dry out the cookie as much. This is the icing that I use the most. I like it because I think it tastes better than royal icing, and I can get almost as much detail with it. This icing, like royal, can be thinned down with water to make a glaze. The icing is stackable, and it can also be shipped, but it takes a little bit longer to dry completely. The biggest downfall of this icing is that it tends to bleed a little bit more than royal. You need to make sure your glaze is dry before adding the detail work. Even taking that into consideration, it is still my favorite to work with."
post #15 of 28
I'm going to have to try this. I usually make vanilla RI for my cookies, but I really love BC flavor better. Good post!
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