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To Refrigerate or Not to Refrigerate! - Page 3  

post #31 of 42
It's creamier when warm.
Beginners, be sure to parrot advice and get your post count up as fast as you can. After all, it's not what you know, it's what people THINK you know.
Beginners, be sure to parrot advice and get your post count up as fast as you can. After all, it's not what you know, it's what people THINK you know.
post #32 of 42
*shiver* does it take any different?
post #33 of 42
I actually am eating cereal with room temperature milk right now. We left it out accidentally when we made chocolate milk earlier. There was only about an inch worth in there, so we're finishing it up. I am not bothered at all! Tastes just the same!
Beginners, be sure to parrot advice and get your post count up as fast as you can. After all, it's not what you know, it's what people THINK you know.
Beginners, be sure to parrot advice and get your post count up as fast as you can. After all, it's not what you know, it's what people THINK you know.
post #34 of 42

I refrigerate 100% of my cakes -buttercream and fondant covered.  I like the icing to be firm for delivery.  It may just be in my head, but a firm cake just seems sturdier to me for transport.  I have yet to loose a cake, so in my head or not, it works for me.

Also, once the buttercream or fondant has firmed up it isn't fragile.  So if I accidently (lightly) bump it, there is no damage.

"who says you can't have your cake and eat it too?"
"who says you can't have your cake and eat it too?"
post #35 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by cai0311 View Post

I refrigerate 100% of my cakes -buttercream and fondant covered.  I like the icing to be firm for delivery.  It may just be in my head, but a firm cake just seems sturdier to me for transport.  I have yet to loose a cake, so in my head or not, it works for me.

Also, once the buttercream or fondant has firmed up it isn't fragile.  So if I accidently (lightly) bump it, there is no damage.

I do the same. The only time I've ever dumped a cake was one that wasn't refrigerated.  I put my fondant decorations in the fridge and I have no problem refrigerating a cake with royal deco on it. The first time i used royal icing decorations I tested by covering a hardened butterfly with straight IMBC (because I was told it would melt the RI) and it was as hard as a rock the next day.

 

The only caveat to my entire story is that I used the SPS this summer, for the first time. I assembled the cake on-site, and experienced some cracking due to the IMBC being so cold. So, In future I will let the cake warm up a bit before transporting to avoid the cracks. 

 

I use Rose Beranbaum's IMBC and she does say it can stay at room temp for up to 8 hours, and she's got a PHD in baking, and stuff. 

 

Jen

post #36 of 42

I would like to watch this post, but I don't see the watch anymore. Is it just me or did they do away with it?

post #37 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by ailika View Post

I would like to watch this post, but I don't see the watch anymore. Is it just me or did they do away with it?

 

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deborahanne

http://grandmasugarskitchen.blogspot.com/
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Life begins at 325° F, and, yes, that IS powdered sugar in my hair.

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deborahanne

http://grandmasugarskitchen.blogspot.com/
http://fromlinetocolor.blogspot.ca/

Life begins at 325° F, and, yes, that IS powdered sugar in my hair.

Baby Shower
(6 photos)
Birthday Cakes
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Christmas
(6 photos)
post #38 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by tykesmommy View Post


The thought of warm milk alone makes me queasy. The smell of milk, whether straight of the shelf or after sitting out, makes my stomach turn. She is a lot braver than I am!

 

Then don't think about the fact that milk comes out of the cow at 101 degrees F.  icon_biggrin.gif

Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes. Art is knowing which ones to keep.
-Scott Adams
Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes. Art is knowing which ones to keep.
-Scott Adams
post #39 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by SandiOh View Post

seriously, where do you people get your information? Have any of you taking the FDA food safety course? Has anyone been approved by the Dept of Ag and given a license? Because if you had you would know that you cannot hold anything with dairy over 40 degree F for more than 4 hours without tossing it. And yes, that includes egg whites.

Or maybe you got an inspector who doesn't care. but mine comes thru with a temp probe.

 

First, the FDA doesn't give food safety classes.  The American National Standards Institute is what gives the classes and it's what all Health Departments follow.  It is scientifically impossible for the contaminates that cause food born illnesses to live, grow and thrive in a food that has a water content of lower then .85 and a pH of higher then 4.6.  Meringue and american style buttercreams are shelf stable.  Even when you add a little milk, cream, chocolate, cream cheese, sour cream, non-dairy creamer, or whatever other things people use for flavoring.  The sugar content is so incredibly high that even with those things added, they are still shelf stable.  I know I should say "most" instead of "all", but I have yet to ever see a recipe for ABC that is NOT shelf stable so I'm all-in now.  I'm sayin ALL.  

 

And no completed buttercream ever needs time/temperature control.  Bavarian cream, yes.  Cheesecake, yes.  Icing?  No.

post #40 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF View Post

 

 

And no completed buttercream ever needs time/temperature control.  Bavarian cream, yes.  Cheesecake, yes.  Icing?  No.

No? Not even the ones that have a cup of milk cooked with starch per cup of butter or shortening?

 

And excuse me, but in CA, the **new** cottage food law  in effect sonce January 1 of 2013 prohibits certain materials from being used at all in baked goods sold by home producers...specifically cream and custard  

 

http://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billNavClient.xhtml?bill_id=201120120AB1616

 

So "adding a smidge of sour cream" or "adding a small amount of cream" to icing is no longer the innocent activity that it used to be.  Not if you sell the end result from home in CA.  And CA is probably not the only state that restricts such uses.

 

So there are exceptions to some general statements that have been made in various threads on Cake Central.

 

I do not believe it is in the interest of the nontechnical people who read Cake Central to see general statements that might actually get them in trouble with the law.  I think it is far better to advise people to use the safest ingredients and recipes and holding practises possible.

post #41 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by KLCCrafts View Post

Then don't think about the fact that milk comes out of the cow at 101 degrees F.  icon_biggrin.gif

Oh wow! Does it really? Learn something new every day!
post #42 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by BakingIrene View Post

No? Not even the ones that have a cup of milk cooked with starch per cup of butter or shortening?

 

And excuse me, but in CA, the **new** cottage food law  in effect sonce January 1 of 2013 prohibits certain materials from being used at all in baked goods sold by home producers...specifically cream and custard  

 

http://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billNavClient.xhtml?bill_id=201120120AB1616

 

So "adding a smidge of sour cream" or "adding a small amount of cream" to icing is no longer the innocent activity that it used to be.  Not if you sell the end result from home in CA.  And CA is probably not the only state that restricts such uses.

 

So there are exceptions to some general statements that have been made in various threads on Cake Central.

 

I do not believe it is in the interest of the nontechnical people who read Cake Central to see general statements that might actually get them in trouble with the law.  I think it is far better to advise people to use the safest ingredients and recipes and holding practises possible.

 

 

Is that an ABC?  I specifically said meringue-based and ABC, and quoted actual science and food standards on the National level in the US.  I've never even had that type of icing before, but looking at the sugar ratio I'd say YES, it probably is, but I really have no idea.  

 

Cottage laws and regulations are a completely different argument and totally off topic - those laws exist because people are cooking in unregulated kitchens using non-commercial equipment without having to have manager or even the basic food handler's permits or certificates.  These laws have very little to do with the science and everything to do with trying to minimize every possible risk to the public without having to have the same type of inspection and oversight as if it was a commercial facility.  There is no national standard for what can and cannot be prepared at someone's house and sold to the public.  It's literally state by state, county by county.

 

Regardless that wasn't the question, and I'm locking this thread because I'm not having a debate about cottage laws in a 5 year old thread that asked about refrigerating a fondant cake.

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