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My Most Moist Cake EVER baking tips! - Page 5

post #61 of 122
Thread Starter 
Well all I can say is I have been using this method for over 15 years, and have never had anyone get sick from it. The cakes never last long enough for it to ever be an issue.
post #62 of 122
Hi cakesdivine and welcome to CC, Thank You so much for all your tips and the recipe i will try it for my DH's b-day nex week, and thank you all of you guys for all your post, this is very informative and is good that everybody share their tips and experiences so we can learn new tips an techniques and improve our knowledge, by the way I have a ???? I read in this post that we can decorate the cake with fondant and icing when is frozen did I understand right? thank you again to everybody and HAPPY BAKING!!!! thumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gif
Frankyia Medina
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Frankyia Medina
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post #63 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakesdivine

Quote:
Originally Posted by melysa

not trying to stir up trouble...just thought i'd share what i've been taught. when making scratch cakes, the extra moisture trapped in by wrapping a cake immediately after baking will make the cake more prone to the growth of bacteria, since there are no preservatives (like in a box mix). i feel like its better to be safe than sorry and cool the cakes fully before wrapping.



This is only an issue if you leave it on the counter wrapped or in the fridge wrapped. Freezing kills any potential bacteria, and the heat from baking kills any as well. The only way bacteria can breed is in a temp from 40 degrees to 140 degrees F. Anything over or under kills it. That is why the immediate freeze is so important. And if you are using any flour that is enriched or bleached, guess what it has preservatives in it. It has to say organic flour to not have any preservatives.



What kind of preservatives?

Mike
post #64 of 122
I looked it up. I can look up the date when the USDA "suggested" the flour to be enriched. This is from http://www.dietitian.com/foodlab.html

The following wheat flours do not include red durum or semolina, which contains bran specs from durum and both are used in the manufacture of pasta. Nor are soft wheat flours included, which are used in the manufacture of cakes, cookies and pastries. Bread flours are made from hard wheat, which contains more gluten (protein) and provides structure to bread.

Wheat Flour is made by grinding wheat and typically does not contain the bran or germ.

Enriched Flour (wheat) is wheat flour (no bran or germ) that has been enriched with thiamin, riboflavin and niacin and may include Vitamin D, iron and calcium that are lost during flour processing.

Enriched Flour (flour) is the same as the above except that the source of the grain is not identified. Other grains such as rye, oats, barley or soybeans can be used in the making of this flour.
post #65 of 122
To expand upon what sillyjodes said, freezing does not kill bacteria. The cooking process kills the bacteria in the cake and the immediate freeze retains the cake in its sterile state.
E.Coli and other bacteria are stored 'alive' at -80C (-112F) where they essentially 'hibernate' and then are brought to 37C (98.6F) to resume growth. This is a method routinely used in labs for production of DNA. (I'm a scientist) There are some bacteria that survive and reproduce outside of this range such as those found in hot springs, but you aren't going to find them in your kitchen! So you don't have to worry about this method making you sick.
Happy Baking!
post #66 of 122
Thread Starter 
Thank you Dr. Tina!
post #67 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakesdivine

Thank you Dr. Tina!



Thank you Dr. Tina and thank you Cakesdivine for selflessly sharing your tips and recipe.
post #68 of 122
Silly old me hopping on the band wagon to share my silly old thoughts...

If I had to worry about all of the things I've seen come up regarding health practices with cakes, I'd be the most paranoid freak ever.

I use rubber stamps, I'll use the Preval sprayer if I can get my hands on one, I stick floral wires into cakes, paint food coloring on with regular old paintbrushes... Oh, and so does Duff (who never freezes his cakes).

icon_smile.gif
No pressure... no diamonds.

WASC Gourmet Flavors
http://docs.google.com/Doc?id=df4f9hbq_46cs9f28fs
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No pressure... no diamonds.

WASC Gourmet Flavors
http://docs.google.com/Doc?id=df4f9hbq_46cs9f28fs
Reply
post #69 of 122
In my previous statements, I intentionally used layman's terms and kept my comments generic, so that I would not sound like I was coming down hard on Cakesdivine. That's not my intention. However, I do not believe this process follow safe food handling.
Now, I can break into some jargon and bore everyone hear to sleep about bacterial growth and aseptic procedures, but I find that turns people off.
I would like to reiterate that freezing will not kill bacteria. Your hands, your counter, the plastic wrap, all have the potential to introduce contaminates to your food. Providing an ideal environment (warm and moist) for things to grow should never be a cooks intention. We should strive to avoid these situations.
post #70 of 122
There are a couple topics that come up on CC that seem to bring up alot of strong opinons. BC vs. fondant, mix vs. scratch. So it seems we have another topic to add to the list.

To wrap/freeze or not to.
post #71 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by sillyjodes

I would like to reiterate that freezing will not kill bacteria. Your hands, your counter, the plastic wrap, all have the potential to introduce contaminates to your food. Providing an ideal environment (warm and moist) for things to grow should never be a cooks intention. We should strive to avoid these situations.



But the thing is, freezing a cake still makes it harder for these bugs to thrive than leaving it out on the counter. There is no way to completely avoid introducing contaminants of one type or another...

The only story I've ever heard of someone complaining about their kids getting sick from cake turned out to be because they ATE too much. Apparantly they brought the leftovers to their room and had a contest to see who could eat the most. (I'm sorry, I can't remember the CCer who posted that story last year, but I do remember her wonderful 3 tier heart cake covered in red sugar crystals).
No pressure... no diamonds.

WASC Gourmet Flavors
http://docs.google.com/Doc?id=df4f9hbq_46cs9f28fs
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No pressure... no diamonds.

WASC Gourmet Flavors
http://docs.google.com/Doc?id=df4f9hbq_46cs9f28fs
Reply
post #72 of 122
Dr. Tina, thanks for the info. I'd say that settles it once and for all. Thanks for looking out for us!
post #73 of 122
So I have been giving this some thought the last couple days. Aside from the creepy crawlies, this is my questions. Does this method make the cake moist or soggy? I mean, if I was to let it come to room temp instead of frosting it well frozen and its so moist is falls apart, I guess I would be worried about it being soggy or mushy. Also, does the weight of the icing affect the end product? If I add alot of flowers or whatever on the cake, does is sag?

I don't know, I am just wondering... icon_confused.gif
post #74 of 122
I have tried freezing cakes twice. Both times wrapping while hot, but both times the cake come out fudgy.
Does anyone else have this problem. I didn't get a nice cake crumb, I got a very dense cake.

I will take full responsibility in maybe I didn't cook it long enough but it passed the toothpick test.

Also when I did this, I did not frost them semi-frozen. I let them thaw completely and when I underwrapped them there was moisture around the cake that had to "dry" or be damped off before I could ice it. If that's the case, am I loosing the moisture when I let them air dry a bit to ice them, right?

I know that some people ice semi-frozen which I will try again at another time.
Visit me at www.keeponcaking.com for tutorials and other cake stuff.
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Visit me at www.keeponcaking.com for tutorials and other cake stuff.
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post #75 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by sillywabbitz

I have tried freezing cakes twice. Both times wrapping while hot, but both times the cake come out fudgy.
Does anyone else have this problem. I didn't get a nice cake crumb, I got a very dense cake.

I will take full responsibility in maybe I didn't cook it long enough but it passed the toothpick test.

Also when I did this, I did not frost them semi-frozen. I let them thaw completely and when I underwrapped them there was moisture around the cake that had to "dry" or be damped off before I could ice it. If that's the case, am I loosing the moisture when I let them air dry a bit to ice them, right?

I know that some people ice semi-frozen which I will try again at another time.



When wrapping a hot cake it is to trap the extra moisture because of the steam, correct? That will add extra water to the cake, correct? What happens to water when it freezes, it expands, correct? That ice will expand, and break down the structure that's been set by the protiens.

Mike
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