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My Most Moist Cake EVER baking tips! - Page 4

post #46 of 122
Thanks for this tip. I can't wait to try it, but my freezer space is limited. If you don't have enough freezer space, what is the next best option - would you still cover it in press-n-seal and just leave it out until it cooled? or put it in the fridge?
Thanks!
post #47 of 122
Thread Starter 
The freezing is pretty crucial, if you just cool it the cake will be too moist to handle and will break apart when moved. I have at times had to place other freezer items in a cooler temporarily to give room for cakes. icon_biggrin.gif
post #48 of 122
Thanks,
post #49 of 122
Hey there cakesdivine, sounds like you are quite the pro... I can't find that buttercream recipe that you posted. Do you have a certain method you use for smoothing your buttercream since you said it doesn't crust? Please let me know, desperate for a great cake and buttercream recipe! Theresa
post #50 of 122
cakesdivine, I found the recipe! YEAH... Can this buttercream stand out at room tempature for a long period of time? If not do you have one that tastes good that can stand out?
post #51 of 122
Also, I would love to know if you have tried it with pasturized eggs whites.

Thanks for posting!

amy
post #52 of 122
Why is it that you can't freeze it while it's still in the pan? That's how I always do it, albeit it's after the cake has been out of the oven for about an hour. It's easy to get out of the pan when frozen.
No pressure... no diamonds.

WASC Gourmet Flavors
http://docs.google.com/Doc?id=df4f9hbq_46cs9f28fs
Reply
No pressure... no diamonds.

WASC Gourmet Flavors
http://docs.google.com/Doc?id=df4f9hbq_46cs9f28fs
Reply
post #53 of 122
Thread Starter 
The pan holds so much heat that the baking process will continue for a few more minutes, plus it take the cake longer to cool down. Also trying to dump the cake frozen, at least in my experience, the cake side stick unless I use a knife to loosen it, and many time tear up the side of the cake in doing so.

On the icing...it works fine at room temp & can last for up to 3 days on the counter with no problem, and yes, you can buy the pasturized egg whites in a carton - omit the cream of tartar if using the pasturized egg whites, just don't try to use meringue powder, it deflates too quickly.
post #54 of 122
o.k. cakes divine, did you say you just posted your bc recipe tonight and people are able to find it tonight? I posted a recipe for Key Lime cake and Key Lime bc several days ago and I can't find it yet. I was told it can take several days before I will see it. What am I doing wrong? Anyone?
...talk about your childhood wishes, you can even eat the dishes!
"Come inside", said the bird to the mouse. I'll show you what there is in a treathouse.
(licensed and inspected home kitchen)
Reply
...talk about your childhood wishes, you can even eat the dishes!
"Come inside", said the bird to the mouse. I'll show you what there is in a treathouse.
(licensed and inspected home kitchen)
Reply
post #55 of 122
Thread Starter 
I posted it first on the recipes & tips forum (this forum actually) first. It may not be showing on the recipes tab yet but it is showing on the forum topic Butter Cream Icing Supreme - Super buttery flavor (I think that's what I put...LOL!)
post #56 of 122
not trying to stir up trouble...just thought i'd share what i've been taught. when making scratch cakes, the extra moisture trapped in by wrapping a cake immediately after baking will make the cake more prone to the growth of bacteria, since there are no preservatives (like in a box mix). i feel like its better to be safe than sorry and cool the cakes fully before wrapping.
post #57 of 122
(just read that this was already discussed *)
post #58 of 122
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by melysa

not trying to stir up trouble...just thought i'd share what i've been taught. when making scratch cakes, the extra moisture trapped in by wrapping a cake immediately after baking will make the cake more prone to the growth of bacteria, since there are no preservatives (like in a box mix). i feel like its better to be safe than sorry and cool the cakes fully before wrapping.



This is only an issue if you leave it on the counter wrapped or in the fridge wrapped. Freezing kills any potential bacteria, and the heat from baking kills any as well. The only way bacteria can breed is in a temp from 40 degrees to 140 degrees F. Anything over or under kills it. That is why the immediate freeze is so important. And if you are using any flour that is enriched or bleached, guess what it has preservatives in it. It has to say organic flour to not have any preservatives.
post #59 of 122
Thanks everyone for posting your comments - this has been very informative.
post #60 of 122
Ok, I'm drawn in by the critter talk and have to add a few comments. Freezing does not kill bacteria. They hibernate under adverse conditions and start reproducing like rabbits as soon as they get toasty again. Also, bacteria and fungus can produce spores to survive colder temps. They quickly "bloom" at room temperature. Any bacteria in your kitchen, on your hands, or on your wrap can contaminate a cake fresh from the oven. That being said, you will find higher bacteria counts in a sponge (ewww) and in the kitchen sink (seriously the drain is worse than a toilet). But I'm not eating or eating out of either.
Jodie
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