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My Most Moist Cake EVER baking tips! - Page 2

post #16 of 122
I also use the wrap and freeze technique. I have found that the moisture is trapped inside and, you're right, it helps a ton! I've never had a dry cake. One thing though, what's with the cold water and cold eggs? I always bring mine to room temp. Can you explain it?
post #17 of 122
Yet another good use for the press'n'seal!! Thanks for all the tips, I'll definately put them to good use. I usually let the cake sit for 10 minutes before wraping w/ plastic wrap then foil, but I do have issues with the foil denting the corners/sides of my cakes. THANK YOU!!!
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post #18 of 122
I am sure I am doing it wrong, but if I don't let my cake sit in the pan for about ten to fifteen minites and cool off, I am always missing the bottom/top of the cake, or the corners don't come out with the cake. I am sure the cake continues to bake due to carryover heat which causes the dryness. Are you taking the cake out of the pan, or just covering the pan?
post #19 of 122
I too would like to know why the cold eggs?
MYW
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MYW
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post #20 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakesdivine

Hello friends and colleagues! My name is Angela Pineda. My tips for the most moist cakes ever was published in Cooking Pleasures magazine in December of 2004.




Hola Angela:

Welcome to CC and thank you soooo much for being so kind and share your secrets.
I've experimented so many scratch recipes already I lost count.

I'll try your technique on my next attempt!

God Bless.
post #21 of 122
Angela is 100% correct about this method!! I learned about it from Scott Clark Woolley years ago. He has the instructions in his book 'Cakes by Design'. If you don't need the cake pan again right away you can leave the cake in the pan, cover it and pop it into the freezer.

Angela is also right about using plastic wrap. Plastic wrap from the grocery store will melt. I use commercial plastic wrap for this and have never had a problem. Caution: if you wrap the pan too tightly the plastic wrap will shrink and cause the cake to compress. When leaving the cake in the pan, I do a loose wrap.

I also use parchment in the bottom of every cake pan...even tube pans. It guarantees that the cake is coming out of the pan.
post #22 of 122
I always....always everytime...with no exception, wrap my cakes in foil imediately after they come out of the oven and let them cool to room temp.
I only have had chocolate cake drop just a tad but not enough to worry about.
I will try the freezing thing....it has to work, there is no where for the moisture to go but into your cake!
Welcome to the forum, cakesdivine...I am sure you have more secrets, feel free to share!!!
Happy baking,
Laura
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When going up the ladder of life, be nice to people on your way up. You never know, when you will see them on the way back down.

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post #23 of 122
Thread Starter 
Wow, Okay - on the issue of leaving in pan...Make sure you use a spray like Bakers Joy or Crisco for Baking to coat your pan sides thoroughly! Now USE PARCHMENT! It is IMPERATIVE! This keeps the hot cake from cracking. You can use waxed paper too but parchment is best! DO NOT LEAVE IN PAN! Dump the cake onto the Press'n Seal sticky side up (towards cake) Use a cooling rack in your freezer so the cold air circulates bottom to top.

As for the cold water & eggs, this aids in the moisture retention, much like a chewy cookie needs a cold dough to start, it evens out the baking process.

Nix the foil! It will only misshape your cakes. The reason for freezin'...LOL! instead of setting on the counter even wrapped fresh from oven is a frozen cake is easier to ice, decorate, carve, & or level than a wet, cool cake. The moister the cake the harder it is to work with!
post #24 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakesdivine


Nix the foil! It will only misshape your cakes. The reason for freezin'...LOL! instead of setting on the counter even wrapped fresh from oven is a frozen cake is easier to ice, decorate, carve, & or level than a wet, cool cake. The moister the cake the harder it is to work with!



I have a question: what type of BC do you normally use to ice your cakes?

My BC recipe is 3/4 Crisco +1/4 unsalted butter.
I iced a semi frozen cake once and as I was icing it the BC became all watery and I had to stop and let the cake come a room temperature to avoid this for happening.

TIA,
post #25 of 122
Thanks for the post!
post #26 of 122
Why not just use a recipe that yields a moist cake? Instead of using trapped steam to give you the moistness you desire.

Mike
post #27 of 122
Thread Starter 
I just posted my buttercream recipe. You will get sweating at some point during the defrost, but it usually doesn't happen until after the cake is fully iced. Icing a cake should be a rapidily done task, if you move too slowly you will have a problem, not only with the icing forming condensation prior to the cake being fully iced but then you have the huge crum factor, especially with chocolate cakes, it can tear up hugh chunks if the cake is defrosted fully when you try to ice it after using the most moist cake method.

After you ice the cake allow it to fully defrost and the sweat to naturally dry before decorating, or if covering with fondant, do so immediately after icing, actually after you ice it before covering with fondant refrigerate the cake so the icing is set, then cover with the fondant.
post #28 of 122
Thread Starter 
I have yet to find a cake scratch or other, that yields the amount of moistness this method produces. Not to mention, it traps in the flavor as well. When steam is created in the cooking process (no matter what the food) when steam escapes so does some of the flavor. Now granted in most foods that is going to happen because you want to eat the food hot so the flavor loss is minimal.

It is a far better method than brushing with simple syrup (yuck) or liquor.
post #29 of 122
I have also always frozen my cakes and agree that it make them truly moist and delicious. I used to wrap them hot until I read in another forum about a year ago that this is dangerous, as the moisture trapped between the plastic and the cake is a breeding ground for bacteria, and this is the reason one should always, without exception, cool cakes before wrapping them. Not trying to challenge, and I have no scientific leaning, just offering what I have read.

Has anyone else heard this? I would love for someone with a scientific background to tell me for sure that this is in fact a safe procedure...
post #30 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakesdivine

I have yet to find a cake scratch or other, that yields the amount of moistness this method produces. Not to mention, it traps in the flavor as well. When steam is created in the cooking process (no matter what the food) when steam escapes so does some of the flavor. Now granted in most foods that is going to happen because you want to eat the food hot so the flavor loss is minimal.

It is a far better method than brushing with simple syrup (yuck) or liquor.



I don't know if all those pastry chefs over the last 200 yrs, or so are wrong about syrup. It can add a certain flavor level to a cake. Are you saying you disagree with the method?

On finding a scratch recipe that will yield moistness, just create one of your own.

Mike
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