Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Recipes › My Most Moist Cake EVER baking tips!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

My Most Moist Cake EVER baking tips!

post #1 of 122
Thread Starter 
Hello friends and colleagues! My name is Angela Pineda. My tips for the most moist cakes ever was published in Cooking Pleasures magazine in December of 2004.

I want to share this tidbit with you. I developed this method about 15 years ago, but back then the medium I had to use was either foil or regular plastic wrap. Both can be used in this method but only if my preferred medium, Glad Press'n Seal is unavailable to you.

Items needed:

Any cake recipe - scratch or boxed (If boxed use Duncan Hines - they are the best)

Glad Press'n Seal wrap - freezer or regular will work.

Use super cold eggs and super cold water unless your scratch recipe calls for something else (Hershey's scratch chocolate cake requires boiling water in its recipe).

Prep your pans using any flour/oil mixture spray (do NOT use the old fashioned shorting/flour method as this leaves a very tough skin on your cake). Line bottom of pan with parchment paper (very important).

Bake cake at 325 degrees until just done to touch (spring back method) or toothpick test.

While cake is baking place enough Press'n Seal on your counter or table, sticky side up to cover your cake(s).

Once cake is done baking, remove it from oven and IMMEDIATELY dump cake onto Press'n Seal wrap. Wrap the cake to seal in all the steam. Then place cake in freezer. Allow to freeze overnight.

Contrary to popular belief freezing is NOT the enemy to baked goods, in fact it is quite the opposite, but as with anything, you cannot leave it in the freezer forever, 2 weeks tops to keep the product fresh.

Any cake left to cool on a cooling rack on the counter will loose 2 things: flavor and moisture. Steam is the element that contains both these factors. Let the steam escape and there goes your flavor and moisture.

When you are ready to decorate your cake allow it to sit for at least 5 minutes before icing. Cake will be semi frozen. Use a crumb coat first - especially with chocolate cakes, then ice normally or cover with fondant.

Cake will fully defrost within 30 minutes and the cake will be incredibly moist and flavorful!

***Note*** using foil or regular plastic wrap can cause the following issues. Foil will almost always misshape the warm cake, so only use if you have no other option. Be wary of regular plastic wraps, some will melt with the heat of the cake and others will shrink terribly misshaping the cake during the freezing process. Both do not seal in the steam as well as Press'n Seal wrap.
post #2 of 122
Well thanks for that wonderful tidbit!!!!
Matt 18:20 "For where two or three come together in my name, there am I with them."

Pray wherever, whenever!
Reply
Matt 18:20 "For where two or three come together in my name, there am I with them."

Pray wherever, whenever!
Reply
post #3 of 122
ooOOOooo i'm definitely gonna have to try this, thanks cakesdivine!
post #4 of 122
Thanks for sharing!
post #5 of 122
Great tip!!! Some of my cakes need a little help in the moisture area! Thanks again!!
post #6 of 122
Thank you!

What about cupcakes? any tips on how to make the cupcakes moist? mine are always dry and look over cooked. I have heard different things that I can do like baking at 325, mix the batter by hand instead of using kitchenaid or any electric mixer, don't mix the batter too much, etc...is this true?? anything else you can add to the list? I need all the help I can get! icon_smile.gif
Carmen
Reply
Carmen
Reply
post #7 of 122
Thread Starter 
I do the same thing with cup cakes but do this. Lay out enough to dump the cupcakes on. Leave space between cakes. The take another sheet of Press'n Seal much larger to individually shape & seal around each cake. The seal the edges up and place with cup cakes bottom side down into freezer. You can do them top side down if you want a flat surface on your cupcake or if making them into bon bon cakes.
post #8 of 122
Thanks, Angela! I read just last week about wrapping a cake while it was warm--and I've been thinking about it since.

Your explanation makes great sense. I have a white cake recipe that I believe is the best in the world--but occasionally it is very dry. Can't figure if I have overbeat the egg whites, overbaked, etc.

I'm definitely gonna try your method next cake!
Breast cancer survivor since May 27, 2009!!!
I am too blessed to be stressed or depressed; too anointed to be disappointed!
Reply
Breast cancer survivor since May 27, 2009!!!
I am too blessed to be stressed or depressed; too anointed to be disappointed!
Reply
post #9 of 122
pinkema, thats sounds like you make a scratch white cake. There is a really good scratch white cake recipe (that I have made) in the Whimsical Bakehouse book that has really great flavor but is terribley dry and crumbley. I've never made it twice eventhough, it had great flavor, because of the dry crumblie texture. Maybe I'll have to try THAT recipe again and use the above method ALSO, with that. My wasc (doctored mix) cake is always so moist that I wouldn't need to wrap it. Although, I do always freeze my (wasc) cakes after they have cooled from the oven. It deffinately does make them even more moist! So after all that said I am going to try SCRATCH cakes again with that method! icon_cool.gif One last thought though, it will be very expensive using the Press and Seal wrap. icon_confused.gif
...talk about your childhood wishes, you can even eat the dishes!
"Come inside", said the bird to the mouse. I'll show you what there is in a treathouse.
(licensed and inspected home kitchen)
Reply
...talk about your childhood wishes, you can even eat the dishes!
"Come inside", said the bird to the mouse. I'll show you what there is in a treathouse.
(licensed and inspected home kitchen)
Reply
post #10 of 122
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cocobean

One last thought though, it will be very expensive using the Press and Seal wrap. icon_confused.gif



Acutally, it really isn't much more of an expense. I can get about 10 1/4 sheet cakes out of one roll and the roll here is only $2.69 at Walmart. Round 8" cakes I can get 20 or so. To me since the moist cakes is what I am known for (and my icing recipes that complement the cakes without being super sugary or crusty) it is an expense minimal to get the clients by word of mouth.
post #11 of 122
I took a cake from the oven, wrapped it in foil, and immediately put it in the freezer last week. When I went to take it out it sank more than I have ever seen a cake sink! The other cake that was baking alongside it was perfectly fine - I left that one out on the counter. icon_confused.gif
No pressure... no diamonds.

WASC Gourmet Flavors
http://docs.google.com/Doc?id=df4f9hbq_46cs9f28fs
Reply
No pressure... no diamonds.

WASC Gourmet Flavors
http://docs.google.com/Doc?id=df4f9hbq_46cs9f28fs
Reply
post #12 of 122
I'll have to try this next time. I'm always up for trying a new idea. Thanks for sharing. icon_razz.gif
My new blog: http://cake2cake.blogspot.com
My website loaded with cake info and links: www.distinctivecakes.com
Reply
My new blog: http://cake2cake.blogspot.com
My website loaded with cake info and links: www.distinctivecakes.com
Reply
post #13 of 122
Thank you so much for sharing with us here! (And congrats on being published!!!) I can't wait to try your tips. My cakes come out moist, but I'd love to get them the "moistiest" they can be!!! icon_razz.gif

Thanks again!
http://www.animalfarmfoundation.org/topic.php?id=1&topic=13
"To restore the image of the American Pit Bull Terrier and to protect him from discrimination and cruelty." (Wonderful adoptable dogs!)
Reply
http://www.animalfarmfoundation.org/topic.php?id=1&topic=13
"To restore the image of the American Pit Bull Terrier and to protect him from discrimination and cruelty." (Wonderful adoptable dogs!)
Reply
post #14 of 122
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacsMom

I took a cake from the oven, wrapped it in foil, and immediately put it in the freezer last week. When I went to take it out it sank more than I have ever seen a cake sink! The other cake that was baking alongside it was perfectly fine - I left that one out on the counter. icon_confused.gif



first of all using foil is a hit or miss proposition to begin with. Also, if the cake isn't fully done, if it is even a minute under fully cooked your cake will fall no matter what. Also if you mixed it for too long it will do the same thing. You must make sure the cake is fully baked and use Press'n Seal. It really will work wonderfully!
post #15 of 122
Thread Starter 
Oh, one more thing...this does not do well with angel food cakes due to the nature of the cake. If your cake has only meringue as it's binder this process will not work!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Recipes
Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Recipes › My Most Moist Cake EVER baking tips!