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Raw eggs in Royal Icing,is it safe?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
I am all out of meringue powder but need to make some RI, is it ok to make it with the egg whites, I don't want anyone to get sick?
I've only ever used the meringue powder.
I thought I read somewhere that the sugar cooks the eggs, is that true?
Oh and I also need it just for a little bit of piping on a fondant cross , so it won't be all over the cake.
Thanks in advance!
post #2 of 8
30+ years ago, a friend gave me an icing recipe that was, unbeknownst to me, a royal icing that used raw egg whites. Used that recipe for years as regular wedding cake icing. (Boy was I excited to find an alternate icing that didn't use eggs!)
post #3 of 8
Obviously if you had the meringue powder this probably is the safest route but having said that royal icing has been made with egg whites for a very long time with no problems!

Meringue powder is not as widely available in Europe as the US so a lot of Europeans have been and still do use egg white icon_smile.gif
post #4 of 8
I just started using meringue powder recently always used whites before.
post #5 of 8
IMPORTANT INFORMATION FROM THE CDC:



Salmonella enteritidis Infection

Egg-associated salmonellosis is an important public health problem in the United States and several European countries. A bacterium, Salmonella enteritidis, can be inside perfectly normal-appearing eggs, and if the eggs are eaten raw or undercooked, the bacterium can cause illness. During the 1980s, illness related to contaminated eggs occurred most frequently in the northeastern United States, but now illness caused by S. enteritidis is increasing in other parts of the country as well. Consumers should be aware of the disease and learn how to minimize the chances of becoming ill.

A person infected with the Salmonella enteritidis bacterium usually has fever, abdominal cramps, and diarrhea beginning 12 to 72 hours after consuming a contaminated food or beverage. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days, and most persons recover without antibiotic treatment. However, the diarrhea can be severe, and the person may be ill enough to require hospitalization.

The elderly, infants, and those with impaired immune systems may have a more severe illness. In these patients, the infection may spread from the intestines to the blood stream, and then to other body sites and can cause death unless the person is treated promptly with antibiotics.



How eggs become contaminated

Unlike eggborne salmonellosis of past decades, the current epidemic is due to intact and disinfected grade A eggs. Salmonella enteritidis silently infects the ovaries of healthy appearing hens and contaminates the eggs before the shells are formed.

Most types of Salmonella live in the intestinal tracts of animals and birds and are transmitted to humans by contaminated foods of animal origin. Stringent procedures for cleaning and inspecting eggs were implemented in the 1970s and have made salmonellosis caused by external fecal contamination of egg shells extremely rare. However, unlike eggborne salmonellosis of past decades, the current epidemic is due to intact and disinfected grade A eggs. The reason for this is that [b]Salmonella enteritidis silently infects the ovaries of healthy appearing hens and contaminates the eggs before the shells are formed.


Although most infected hens have been found in the northeastern United States, the infection also occurs in hens in other areas of the country. In the Northeast, approximately one in 10,000 eggs may be internally contaminated. In other parts of the United States, contaminated eggs appear less common. Only a small number of hens seem to be infected at any given time, and an infected hen can lay many normal eggs while only occasionally laying an egg contaminated with the Salmonella bacterium.

Who can be infected?

The elderly, infants, and persons with impaired immune systems are at increased risk for serious illness.

Healthy adults and children are at risk for egg-associated salmonellosis, but the elderly, infants, and persons with impaired immune systems are at increased risk for serious illness. In these persons, a relatively small number of Salmonella bacteria can cause severe illness. Most of the deaths caused by Salmonella enteritidis have occurred among the elderly in nursing homes. Egg-containing dishes prepared for any of these high-risk persons in hospitals, in nursing homes, in restaurants, or at home should be thoroughly cooked and served promptly.

Here is the link for further information on this subject.

http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dbmd/diseaseinfo/salment_g.htm#How%20Eggs%20Become%20Contaminated

[/b]
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Live Simply, Love Generously, Care Deeply, Speak Kindly and Leave the Rest to God!
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post #6 of 8
Yourstruly, I have - for years - used raw egg whites in my royal icing and I've never had a problem. You can buy pasteurized eggs if you feel safer using those, but the chance of getting salmonella now as opposed to years gone by is much lower. Just don't let the eggshells come into contact with your royal icing. The outsides are not sterile.

I generally only use royal icing for cookies (I'm not a fan of royal icing flowers on cakes) and I don't sell them - just give them to friends and family - but I tell the recipients that there are raw egg whites in the icing in case the recipients include someone who's pregnant, is a child or an elderly person.
"Mmmmmmmmm donuts." - Homer Simpson
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"Mmmmmmmmm donuts." - Homer Simpson
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post #7 of 8
Are you making the royal icing for decorative purpose, i.e. something that will not be eaten or is it meant to be eaten. Just decoration, make the royal with egg whites; if it is going to be eaten, wait and get meringue powder. Personally I will eat items with raw eggs in them because the risk is sight; however, selling something with raw eggs is a different matter.
post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 
if it was just for personal consumption i would use the whites but since its not i went out and got some powder. i just did'nt want to have to leave the shop but its better safe then sorry.
i eat my fried eggs runny in the middle and raw cookie dough like its going out of style,but this cake is for a nursing mother and i did'nt want to chance it.
thanx to everyone for their help.
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