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Question for those who bake and sell from home - Page 9

post #121 of 222
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkalman

Here in NH you can't use the kitchen sink to wash your hands.. that sink is your "sanitation sink" and you have to use the bathroom sink to wash your hands and have a roll of paper towels in there.

Such different regulations over this great country of ours.. it's enough to drive you batty.



Yeah, Jeanne, for sure crazy different, emphasis on crazy.

Those regulations are for commercial bakeries because there is no legal home baking in my county. I should have made that distinction in the earlier post. But I was just comparing it to what is allow-able in a home.

if you had your own tv show what would be your favorite commercial/sponsor

i think i'd like ghirardelli and hershey for starters...

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if you had your own tv show what would be your favorite commercial/sponsor

i think i'd like ghirardelli and hershey for starters...

Reply
post #122 of 222
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitagrl

Quote:
Originally Posted by k8memphis

In Tennessee you can't have a bathroom open into or toward the kitchen--you have to have a hallway with doors as a buffer in between.

After you wash your hands in the bathroom and re-enter the kitchen, you have to wash your hands again.



I do that sometimes anyway...LOL...bathroom doors are gross...(or can be!)



I set that rule in my kitchen anyway ..... yeah, you PROBABLY washed your hands in the bathroom ... but I didn't see you do it, so hands ARE washed upon entry into my kitchen.
post #123 of 222
I wonder if those Purel dispensers could be incorporated somehow. I've noticed those things popping up everywhere.
We were at a wedding a couple of weeks ago and they had one of those dispensers hanging on the wall near the alter. The priest and the people that were serving communion, used the Purel before they touched anything.
post #124 of 222
My health dept puts out literature that says using hand sanitizers does NOT replace hand washing. (I was involved at an outdoor event where portable hand washing stations were required if serving food .... detailed instructions were passed to all vendors, along with the info re: the sanitizer.)
post #125 of 222
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

My health dept puts out literature that says using hand sanitizers does NOT replace hand washing. (I was involved at an outdoor event where portable hand washing stations were required if serving food .... detailed instructions were passed to all vendors, along with the info re: the sanitizer.)



I wouldn't think so...it won't kill viruses, and it won't kill all of the bacteria that I know of...? I use it in absence of a sink but I figured in hospitals and kitchens its more of a "post hand washing" thing, to further kill anything left on your hands.

Actually I heard running water with regular soap does more than anything else to clean your hands.
post #126 of 222
ok would like to know, how much it is to get a license in the state of florida any one out there than can give us the information
post #127 of 222
Thanks indy.......that makes sense...
I still chuckle now when I think of that purel dispenser on the alter, it was so out of place. My DH leaned over and whispered to me "Do you think that's Holy Purel?"
post #128 of 222
In Florida you cannot have your home kitchen licensed. It has to be a separate commercial kitchen.

Those hand sanitizers aren't worth their weight in dog poo. The don't kill much of anything and actually, bacteria will actually grow on it. In my microbiology class we did experiments to see which "anti-bacterial" agents worked the best.. the only thing that truely worked was good ole' Clorox bleach. Even the hospital grade foam hand sanitizer allowed bacterial growth. They foster a false sense of security. People feel that they don't have to wash their hands because they used purell and they can spread more germs than they would if they just washed with warm water and normal (not anti-bacterial) soap.
post #129 of 222
icon_confused.gif Washing your hands in the BATHROOM is cleaner than the kitchen sink? Really? icon_surprised.gif

I have read all of this and appreciate the information shared by everyone. I am in the beginning, feeling my way phase, making a cake for every possible occasion and trying to learn as much as I can. I understand the liability issues in being licensed. The part I don't understand is the idea that if I sell my cakes cheaper, I'm hurting someones business. I have never sold a cake, but if I did I would have to sell it at prices the people I know would be able to afford. If a licensed baker sells a 10" round for 70$, maybe that's very reasonable where they live, but nobody I know could afford that. If thay had to pay even half of that, they simply would not buy it. So, if I sold it to them for an amount they could afford, it would not hurt the business of someone who charged more because they would not have that customer anyway.
post #130 of 222
It's not that the bathroom is cleaner than the kitchen.. it's so that you aren't contaminating your sanitation sink with your handwashing.

And yes.. my bathroom is VERY clean when I am baking and decorating. It's usually clean since I have young kids and I like it to be clean for them (and I have to clean it daily BECAUSE of them and their messes), but on cake days it gets the deep clean complete with bleach... the whole thing including the cabinet and door handles and floor and walls surrounding the sink. The whole first floor gets the deep clean on baking days, but the "handwashing sink" and surrounding areas get the deepest clean (aside from the kitchen). Yes it can take me a solid hour to get the place ready for baking, but it's what I signed up for. A commercial kitchen would be MUCH easier.. at the end of the day it gets cleaned and the next morning.. it's still clean and ready for you. Unlike my home kitchen that gets messed up by its inhabitants so momma/bakery owner has to clean it many times a day and in the morning too.. even if it was cleaned the night before. There are days when I wish I just had a full commercial kitchen outside of my home.. it'd make the cleaning part easier anyway. icon_lol.gif

And to Heather.. if you sell your cakes for pennies on the dollar, the one you are hurting most is yourself. You are working hard for not a lot of compensation and taking time away from your life and your family with little to show for it.

I am one of those who charge plenty for cakes.. minimum order is $100 and that will get you an 8" cake covered in fondant and nicely decorated. I want the hours that cakes take me away from my family to be worth it. I am not going to spend 4 hours on a cake (4 hours that I could be enjoying my kids and husband) only to make $10. No way no how. I'd rather not make that $10 and read to my children.
post #131 of 222
Quote:
Originally Posted by heather1972

but if I did I would have to sell it at prices the people I know would be able to afford.



I dont' think any business sets pricing that way. icon_confused.gif

Cost of raw materials plus labor plus overhead plus profit margin = selling price. "It is what it is."

My husband works at a cadillac dealership. Lots of folks spent $50,000 or more for a car there. The dealership doesn't set the price with the thought of "well, some people can't afford $50,000, so we'll just sell it for $30,000." They'd be out of business in no time. They have rent to pay, utilities, insurance, loan payments, payroll, benefits, etc etc to pay out of the profit of that car.

It costs what it costs.

The person who can't afford a $70 cake ... yeah, they may not be my customer anyway. But the person who CAN afford a $70 cake just might go elsewhere to buy the cake from the person who is undercutting the market and de-valueing the price of cakes.

It's like if you live in a $100,000 house neighborhood and one of your neighbors sells their house for $60,000. The comparables in your neighborhood just went down and when you try to sell your house, the buyer is going to tell you your house isn't worth $100,000 "....because the guy across the street sold his for $60,000."
post #132 of 222
I thought I was the only one who scrubbed the kitchen just to get it dirty!! I am fortunate that my oldest son has had some kitchen time on the line. So he helps me keep it up to par. (He is even the one that checks dates on the condiments)
post #133 of 222
Quote:
Originally Posted by justducky

I am fortunate that my oldest son has had some kitchen time on the line. So he helps me keep it up to par.


My son popped in one day just a day or two after a big catering, when everything is in the middle of being cleaned and being put away. He said, "Mom, I need to come down and help you do a thorough Marine Cleaning and Organizing!" My reaction?? "YES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Be here!!!!" icon_biggrin.gif
post #134 of 222
I just wanted to comment on this general statement

*****charging is against the law if you aren't legal*****

Depending on where you are, even if you DON'T charge this is illegal as well.

I posted on another thread how my building is in the county, but on the city line...well the city regulations explicitly say "No food may be produce for free or for sale without a licensed kitchen."

So no matter what you really have to check where you live.
post #135 of 222
I live in Nebraska and according to our laws, you can sell cakes (and other baked goods - except cream pies!) at the local farmer's market on Saturdays. But now I'm all scared to try that even because of this site! I was going to try that until I can save up enough money for opening up a business. I am also thinking that we are a state that permits licensing home bakeries without a 2nd kitchen...but then I read all this and I feel guilty about that even...
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"Kitchen-ista and Ranch-wife-extraordinaire" (It's all in a day's work!)
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"Kitchen-ista and Ranch-wife-extraordinaire" (It's all in a day's work!)
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