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Are copper cookie cutters better?

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
What is your experience with different cookie cutters? Are copper worth the extra money?
Jessica
post #2 of 26
So much, I think, depends on how many cookies you bake. I get by fine with the stainless steel and the plastic cutters. The metal ones give cleaner edges than the plastic, but a lot of that isn't noticeable once the cookie has baked. Some decorators do so many cookies, that the higher quality copper makes sense for them. And there are certain shapes that you can only get with the copper.
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post #3 of 26
Copper is better for the person $elling the cutters.

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post #4 of 26
I think so. They are more expensive, but they'll last forever with no worries about rust or loss of shape. Most copper cutters are larger, in the 5"-6" range. Plus, I think they're beautiful and I use them to decorate my kitchen.

Tin cutters are much less expensive and because the metal's thinner and more bendable, they can be more intricately shaped than copper cutters. They will definitely rust if not properly cared for. They are sized anywhere from 1" on up. The average is about 3"-4". It will be easier to find smaller shapes in tin. (Some copper companies do sell minis but they aren't nearly as detailed.) Also, you have to be careful not to bend or "pinch" them.

It really comes down to the size and shape cutter you need. You can find both tin and copper wedding cakes, for example. IMHO, if you're going to use it a lot, buy copper. Most of us have both. Sometimes the shape you want is available in one or the other and you just have to buy whichever it is.

However, Kneadacookie is perfectly happy using templates for most of her cookies. I am neither that talented nor patient. icon_lol.gif

HTH! icon_biggrin.gif

A list of my favorite sources:

Copper:
http://stores.ecrandal.com/StoreFront.bok
http://www.coppergifts.com/
http://kitchengifts.com/
http://www.simonscookiecutters.com/
http://www.frankencutters.com/fc/
http://www.walnutcreekmetamora.com/cookie_cutters.htm

Tin:
http://www.foosecookiecutters.com/store/
http://www.thelittlefoxfactory.com/
http://www.karenscookies.net/shop/
http://lacuisineus.com/catalog/index.php?cPath=39
http://www.pietersmatinworks.com/Cookie-Cutters-s/39.htm

Plastic and asst.:
http://www.grammascutters.com/xmas_new.asp
http://www.cookiecutters.com/
http://www.countrykitchensa.com/Index.aspx
http://fancyflours.com/
post #5 of 26
I need a 5 x 7 rectangular shaped cookie cutter that I will be using over and over again. Should I use a cookie cutter of perhaps just roll my cookie dough (sugar) out and use a bench scraper or pastry/ dough cutter to cut them to length/shape?

I will be hopefully producing numerous cookies at one time so speed is a concern. But so is consistency in size shape etc.....
When I saw this post concerning copper vs tin. The durability ease of cleaning etc is a major concern. Thanks in advance to all.
post #6 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweettoothmom

I need a 5 x 7 rectangular shaped cookie cutter that I will be using over and over again. Should I use a cookie cutter of perhaps just roll my cookie dough (sugar) out and use a bench scraper or pastry/ dough cutter to cut them to length/shape?

I will be hopefully producing numerous cookies at one time so speed is a concern. But so is consistency in size shape etc.....
When I saw this post concerning copper vs tin. The durability ease of cleaning etc is a major concern. Thanks in advance to all.



An option to consider is to make your own cutter. You can find a tutorial on CC, or you can purchase a cookie cutter kit from Foose. Having a cutter will make the whole process go quicker and with a lot less hassle!
The pessimist complains about the wind;
the optimist expects it to change;
the realist adjusts the sails.
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The pessimist complains about the wind;
the optimist expects it to change;
the realist adjusts the sails.
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post #7 of 26
I would make a nice stiff plastic covered cardboard the size you want then just use that as a guide to lay a ruler next to it and cut it with a pizza roller or something. Much easier than squishing a cutter that size yes?

That's just a cookie cutter thought for you.
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post #8 of 26
Wait, I would cut the pattern out of a nice plastic lid so I could wash it easy.

I mean you could make two patterns a big 10x14 --cut that out

And then have a 5x7 to set into each corner and make the cross cuts across the middle.

If I was doing a bunch I'd do something like that.

These are also WONDERFUL.

http://www.kitchenfriendly.com/

I thought 'so what?' until I tried it!! Worth every penny.
I was addicted to the Hokey Pokey, but I turned myself around.

 

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I was addicted to the Hokey Pokey, but I turned myself around.

 

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post #9 of 26
Be careful what you use if you make your own cutters. Although aluminum flashing was made with food safe ingredients when the tutorial author wrote it, the aluminum flashing now carried at Home Depot is not food safe. I went up and down the aisles trying to find something food safe to use to no avail. I am trying to find a good source for the metal to make cutters and will post it when I do. The kit from Foose looks great though, but I am just trying to save money by finding a cheaper alternative. I did make a few by 'recycling' ones I wasn't using, using the JB Weld Cold weld recommended in the article and that worked well.

For now I make templates out of the template plastic found in the quilting section of Joann's. I can make any design I need in any size, it is sturdy and it washes easily for future use (and doesn't cost a lot to produce). I use a fine tip, thin bladed knife to cut the dough, making sure first that my dough is well chilled. Not spiffy for huge amounts of the same design, but it works well for now!
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post #10 of 26
k8memphis - I have to agree with you even though other people love their copper cutters.

No, you don't have to worry about rust, but I find them to be very stiff. If they're not made completely "level" you simply can't push them down hard enough to cut the dough cleanly because they don't bend at all. I also don't like the mark they leave on the cookies where they're seamed together. Little things like that bother me.

TracyLH - I've read so much about the aluminum flashing being foodsafe or not and from what I've read it's about half and half. Some think it's not, others do. A couple of months ago Southern Living had a recipe in their magazine showing ice-cream being served in little galvanized buckets. Some restaurants have work spaces with countertops made of galvanized metal. I tried making cutters from non-galvanized flashing strips and found that if you bend them too much they just break apart.

Because I was also concerned about the safety of the metal my solution to making cutters has been to buy the large heart or circle cutters for .69 each at Hobby Lobby, cut them apart and shape them to fit my needs. Not expensive at all.

I also like to bend my cutters at times, for example...turning a circle temporarily into a balloon shape and then back again. You can't do that with copper either. I think they're beautiful and fun to own some, but I'm not a major fan of them.
Mom, did you make any extras?!
www.flickr.com/photos/cookiecuttercreations
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Mom, did you make any extras?!
www.flickr.com/photos/cookiecuttercreations
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post #11 of 26
The Dobord is $75 + shipping! I'd rather use rolling pin rings or perfection strips. They're easy to use, much less expensive, washable and easy to store.
http://www.countrykitchensa.com/catalog/product.aspx?T=1&productId=625575
http://www.countrykitchensa.com/catalog/product.aspx?T=3&ShopId=44&CatId=607&SubCatId=878&productId=628664

sweettoothmom, are you cutting 10 or 100? If you're cutting a small amount a template will work just fine. But 100? If it were me, I'd get (or make) a cutter. You did say speed and consistency were concerns. Will you be doing these regularly or just this once? If you're doing them regularly for a business, a copper cutter (or stainless steel) would be very helpful.
post #12 of 26
bakincc - Great idea with getting the circle or heart at Hobby Lobby and reshaping it! I did that with a monstrously large shamrock cutter and it worked well, but I don't have any more cutters I can sacrifice. Unfortunately, no Hobby Lobby here, but I will look at a few other places and see what they have. Regarding the alum. flashing at Home Depot, I called the company who makes the flashing directly (three times to make sure), and each time they said it was a no-go as the materials they use in the production process (non foodsafe oils, chemicals, etc.) will not come off of the flashing even with many, many washings. icon_sad.gif Too bad as that would have been great.
"I think every woman should have a blowtorch." - Julia Child
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"I think every woman should have a blowtorch." - Julia Child
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post #13 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweettoothmom

I need a 5 x 7 rectangular shaped cookie cutter that I will be using over and over again. Should I use a cookie cutter of perhaps just roll my cookie dough (sugar) out and use a bench scraper or pastry/ dough cutter to cut them to length/shape?

I will be hopefully producing numerous cookies at one time so speed is a concern. But so is consistency in size shape etc.....
When I saw this post concerning copper vs tin. The durability ease of cleaning etc is a major concern. Thanks in advance to all.



For any squares, rectangles, diamond shapes - a good metal ruler, metal square (I have my father's, so I smile and think of him each time I use it) and a pizza cutter is all you need. Bench scraper or big drywall knife (more hardware!) will work too. Measuring and cutting this way means less waste and re-rolling. I have a set of square cutters, but you get the little bits of dough if you don't set the cutter exactly in the previous seams.

Have fun.
Pat
post #14 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Honeydukes

The Dobord is $75 + shipping! I'd rather use rolling pin rings or perfection strips. They're easy to use, much less expensive, washable and easy to store.
http://www.countrykitchensa.com/catalog/product.aspx?T=1&productId=625575
http://www.countrykitchensa.com/catalog/product.aspx?T=3&ShopId=44&CatId=607&SubCatId=878&productId=628664



Yeah, it's an expensive cake toy. But I LOVE mine! It's cheaper if you check out cake n crumbs website it's under cookie equipment--it's listed for $61--not cheap but it's nice for gum paste, fondant and anything you want to automatically roll out to 1/8", 1/4", 1/2", 3/4". I make those 3-d cookies that have different pieces that set into each other--everything comes out so nice so easy.

Clearly it's a chichifoofoo cake toy--but kids can roll stuff out easy peasy too--great for them. It controls the mess better too somehow.
I was addicted to the Hokey Pokey, but I turned myself around.

 

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I was addicted to the Hokey Pokey, but I turned myself around.

 

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post #15 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by k8memphis


These are also WONDERFUL.

http://www.kitchenfriendly.com/

I thought 'so what?' until I tried it!! Worth every penny.



OH k8memphis this is the perfect solution. I need to be able to be certain each cookie is the sale thickness and size. Continuity is very important in this project. Thank you so much I will order this week. Sending love and hugs your way!!! icon_biggrin.gif
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