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Petit Four Pan - big mistake

post #1 of 33
Thread Starter 
I have been trying everything to create pretty little petit fours. I purchased the $70 pan from the fat daddios line that bakes 16 little cakes at one time and because of the separators claims to limit crumbs. I was never so disappointed. Maybe I am not doing something right but I may as well had baked a sheet cake and cut to size. I was expecting the top and sides to brown pretty like a regular cake. Unless I am missing something, and I'm open to suggestions, I would not recommend this product.
post #2 of 33
Thank you for posting this. I really wanted to by that pan and was thinking really hard about it. What happpened to the cakes? You didn't really describe what they looked like. Did the pan come with directions? Sorry for all the questions but maybe it will help you figure out what went wrong or hopefully someone else can chime in. I'm sorry it didn't work out for you. icon_sad.gif
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"Once a Marine Always a Marine" Semper Fi!!!
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post #3 of 33
I have been thinking about this pan. Thanks for the info. What did the cakes look like? My concern was flouring the sides to prevent sticking.
post #4 of 33
Thread Starter 
Well - I used the liquid no stick stuff and coated the insides of the tubes really well. I filled approximately 1/2 full and then baked. After cooling and turning out of teh tubes the sides didn't have a "crust" they were very crumbly. Now the top crusted like a cake but the sides did not and they were flimsy - some broke in half. It was not pretty!
post #5 of 33
I (sadly) know only from trial and error (more of the latter) that FD pans are VERY temperature sensitive. Could that maybe be an issue? The recommend on their other pans to bake at 325 and even that doesn't work for me. What I have done and found GREAT (and I do mean night and day difference!) is that I bake at 300 and then half way thru I will crank it up to 325. It makes a wonderful even bake for me that way. Oh and I don't use any kink of bake-even strips.
I don't know if that helps, but maybe a temp adjustment might work. Hmmmmmmmmmm...I see cake balls in your future! icon_confused.gif
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When one door closes, another will always open. If you find yourself inbetween too long then look for the nearest window!!
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post #6 of 33
Thread Starter 
OK Spunkybear, I'll try. You're right cake balls & cake crumbs (we eat both). Thanks
post #7 of 33
I didnt see the petit four under fat daddio..i did see a set under Silverwood cake pans. are those the ones? i was thinking of getting them
post #8 of 33
Thread Starter 
Yeah - not FD but Silverwood. Sorry FD no disrepect intended!!! icon_redface.gif
post #9 of 33
What type of recipe did you make?
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Practice Practice Practice.
Life is short, enjoy what you do!
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post #10 of 33
Thread Starter 
wasc
post #11 of 33
I think personally that WASC is too soft. You really need a pound cake type recipe so the cakes will not fall over. The other thing you can do is use "a cake ball" recipe mix it and place it in a pan the height you want. Say 1 1/2 inch or more with parchment on the bottom and sides freeze and then pull out of pan, use small cutters for rounds and other or just slice square or in diamonds and ice or cover in ganache. They work well too.

This works for me.

Good Luck.
Practice Practice Practice.
Life is short, enjoy what you do!
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Practice Practice Practice.
Life is short, enjoy what you do!
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post #12 of 33
ok, what type of frosting/or pourable fondant do you use for your petit fours? Thanks for the post about the pan. I agree maybe the pound cake would work better or a nice stable lemon or chocolate.
post #13 of 33
I can see where the sides would not form a crust, becaue the are not exposed to the outside air of the oven. They are insulated by more cake, KWIM?

but then again, whats is the purpose if they do not give you a crust?

Sharon Zambito

SugarEd Productions Online Sugar Art School 
www.sugaredproductions.com

 

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Sharon Zambito

SugarEd Productions Online Sugar Art School 
www.sugaredproductions.com

 

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post #14 of 33
Thread Starter 
You know I was thinking it would cook like a muffin - it is sealed with a little crust and not exposed to outside air. Too good to be true. I've used rolled fondant and pourable fondant (recipe here). I've cut cake then froze cake and even tried mini-muffins. Petit fours and me - not a good combination.
post #15 of 33
Don't give up on the petit fours. I had to make them for the first time in June and everyone liked them so much that I keep ending up making more.

When I make petit fours, I bake a 9X13 with WASC, level and cut the sides off, torte it (yes, it's very thin, I slide the top off onto a cookie sheet that has no edge) put a layer of buttercream in and another one on top, lay waxed paper on top of the buttercream and press it smooth, then wrap the whole thing up and freeze it overnight.

Then I cut it up with deep cookie cutters http://www.cheftools.com/prodinfo.asp?number=02-0400 or with a knife and put the cut pieces back in the freezer until I'm ready for them.

I've only done petit fours with rolled fondant. I put it on while they're still frozen. They get sticky but dry out in a couple of hours.
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