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Topsy Turvy Cakes...

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
When making a TT cake do u have to carve a hole on the top of each tier to put the cake inside the other? Did that make sense??
post #2 of 14
You don't have to do it this way, but it does make the cake more stable, especially if you're going to be delivering it fully stacked. With this method you give the illusion of a "crooked" cake, but each tier is actually perfectly level.
Tara
<---wonders if anyone uses REAL ingredients anymore--sugar fruit nuts, cream, butter etc--instead of flavoring chemical cream from a bucket with pudding & jello and calling it "mousse"
Reply
Tara
<---wonders if anyone uses REAL ingredients anymore--sugar fruit nuts, cream, butter etc--instead of flavoring chemical cream from a bucket with pudding & jello and calling it "mousse"
Reply
post #3 of 14
I wouldn't do it any other way.. resting cake on a slanted surface is just BEGGING for trouble. icon_lol.gif
post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkZiab

You don't have to do it this way, but it does make the cake more stable, especially if you're going to be delivering it fully stacked. With this method you give the illusion of a "crooked" cake, but each tier is actually perfectly level.



I tried to make one for my sister and it fell. Can you send me instructions on how to do this. What type of supports do you use in it? I am at a loss.
post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkZiab

You don't have to do it this way, but it does make the cake more stable, especially if you're going to be delivering it fully stacked. With this method you give the illusion of a "crooked" cake, but each tier is actually perfectly level.



I tried to make one for my sister and it fell. Can you send me instructions on how to do this. What type of supports do you use in it? I am at a loss.
post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 
Yea can u send me instructions too? Thanks everyone for ur help icon_smile.gif
post #7 of 14
post #8 of 14
This is a quick diagram comparing the stress on a TT cake's internal struckture if you do it with a well cut out and without. As you can see, if you cut the well the force of gravity on the cake pulls perpendicular ot the layers. There's no fear of slippage because the cake isn't crooked.. the top is just carved. If you look at the other one, the force of gravity is pulling at an angle to the layers and they are going to want to slip in that direction.
LL
post #9 of 14
Quote:
Quote:

I wouldn't do it any other way.



oh I wholeheartedly agree... I only use the carved out method myself... but I know some decorators do it the "risky" way with success... I've never been much of a gambler myself lol.
Tara
<---wonders if anyone uses REAL ingredients anymore--sugar fruit nuts, cream, butter etc--instead of flavoring chemical cream from a bucket with pudding & jello and calling it "mousse"
Reply
Tara
<---wonders if anyone uses REAL ingredients anymore--sugar fruit nuts, cream, butter etc--instead of flavoring chemical cream from a bucket with pudding & jello and calling it "mousse"
Reply
post #10 of 14
I have not tried this yet but this is one of the ways to do it. http://forum.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-587795.html
HTH
post #11 of 14
Once I saw that Lindy Smith doesn't carve the hole, I never looked back.

I had so many issues with that flippin' hole--the "wall" sliding off, not making it big enough so it cracked after I placed the top tier on, and just being more work than necessary--I was happy to see it works just fine without it.

I do find that both the top and bottom of the tiers need a slant so they aren't protuding out to one side. A wedge shape (except for the bottom tier).

How I do it: I glue 4 foam core together for the baseboard. This way I have a good support base when I hammer the dowels down into them. Each tier is also on foam core board. After I stack the cakes as I normally would (using a small amount of piping gel to help hold them in place), I hammer 2 long dowels all the way through all tiers down into the base board.

I traveled with the following cakes fully assembled and they were perfect upon arrival.
LL
LL
No pressure... no diamonds.

WASC Gourmet Flavors
http://docs.google.com/Doc?id=df4f9hbq_46cs9f28fs
Reply
No pressure... no diamonds.

WASC Gourmet Flavors
http://docs.google.com/Doc?id=df4f9hbq_46cs9f28fs
Reply
post #12 of 14
i made my first topsy turvy cake this week, i didn't use the cut out method, i just stacked them, so far so good..lol,
tho if i had to transport it somewhere then i think maybe i would try the cut out method,
here's my cake, without the cut out support.
http://www.cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1245502
post #13 of 14
I also don't like the way the top of the stacked tier tends to level out if you just rest it on the tier below. You'd have to carve a really extreme angle to get it too still look crooked.

You can also use straight tiers and use styrofoam wedges to give the illusion of it being crooked, but you still have cakes that are tilted and the risk for slippage is still there. You would have to decorate to cover up the wedges too. icon_smile.gif
LL
post #14 of 14
Hi im pretty new to cake making and have also been wondering how to do the topsy turvy cake. Do these cakes not get stacked on a pole of some sort to stop then from slipping?
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