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All these buttercreams - HELP!

post #1 of 46
Thread Starter 
I have made American buttercream many times. I have tried several different recipes and I know that most of them crust, and they're pretty much extremely sweet (what most people expect with buttercream). My next batch of buttercream will be my first go at Sugarshack's recipe/method.

I have not tried any of the meringue buttercreams, and don't really know much about them - except that they don't crust and aren't as sweet. Can somebody educate me on the differences between SMBC, IMBC and FMBC as far a taste, texture, ease (or lack there-of) of preparation and decorating possibilities are concerned? Any information would be appreciated - I would love to have more options!
post #2 of 46
Thread Starter 
Anyone want to take a stab at this? Anyone?
post #3 of 46
3D, I'm wondering the same thing. I've never made smbc or imbc, but would like to try it on the next birthday that rolls around. I'm curious about the creamy whipped buttercream. I've not heard anyone mention it. Wonder if it's any good?

Bev
Beverly
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Beverly
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post #4 of 46
Oh, and I'm also interested in trying the french buttercream. All I've tried (on decorated cakes) is the Wilton Class Buttercream and Buttercream Dream. I would like to expand a little!

Bev
Beverly
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Beverly
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post #5 of 46
Thread Starter 
Nobody wants to give this a shot?

How about those that use meringue butercreams... Which one do you use? What do you like about it? And dislike? What kinds of things can you do with decoration and what can't you do?

TIA!
post #6 of 46
post #7 of 46
wow that is wonderful info.

thanks so much for sharing.

icon_biggrin.gif
post #8 of 46
Thread Starter 
Yay, the link-master has appeared, LOL! Thank you, thank you.

(And I drool every time I see your David D. icon - he's even yummier than cake icon_lol.gif )
post #9 of 46
You're both very welcome. icon_smile.gif

Sorry about the edits, but I had to post what I had before MSN closed all my open windows (in response to some error). icon_eek.gif

...can't wait until July 25 for the new X-Files movie! thumbs_up.gif
post #10 of 46
5 types of buttercreams-

American (simple) Buttercream- uses 10x sugar and often shortening instead of butter

German (fondant type) contains equal parts butter and fondant, is very smooth, rich and dense

Swiss- made fromSwiss meringue/butter

Italian- made from an Italian meringue/butter

French- made with egg yolks/butter/sugar and is very rich and yellow in color
post #11 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bijoudelanuit

German (fondant type) contains equal parts butter and fondant, is very smooth, rich and dense



Do you have any recipes for German fondant?

I've searched and can't find any....just a description. icon_confused.gif
(Although I was able to find recipe for German b/c.)

TIA
post #12 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThreeDGirlie

Nobody wants to give this a shot?

How about those that use meringue butercreams... Which one do you use? What do you like about it? And dislike? What kinds of things can you do with decoration and what can't you do?

TIA!



I 'm no expert...been at this less than a year...I've tried a couple of shortening-and-butter, and shortening only, and IMBC...my/our preference was IMBC(it was for my daughter's wedding cakes)
Was real nervous the first time I made it,but by the end it was a breeze(made 3 triple batches for the wedding)
It"s VERY rich...a pound of butter per batch,and less sweet(1 1/4 cups of sugar per)....it doesn't crust,but I used it to fill and generously(thickly) crumb coat...put in the fridge to set up...worked well.
Can't help with the decorations part...mine were fondant and fondant/gumpaste
HTH
mental insanity takes many forms,and this is one of them!
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mental insanity takes many forms,and this is one of them!
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post #13 of 46
There isn't a recipe for German as it's just a 1:1 ratio of fondant and butter plus flavoring to reach the desired taste. If you want 2 pounds of German buttercream you would mix 1 pound of butter with 1 pound of fondant and add your flavoring.
post #14 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bijoudelanuit

There isn't a recipe for German as it's just a 1:1 ratio of fondant and butter plus flavoring to reach the desired taste.



What recipe/s do you recommend for the fondant, there are different types, cooked & uncooked.

It would seem that an uncooked fondant (MMF) mixed with an equal amount of butter would disintegrate....

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bijoudelanuit

If you want 2 pounds of German buttercream



This is the info I have on German b/c (cooked custard, either flour or egg which is then added to butter):
(But this is not fondant-like.)

http://www.cheftalk.com/forums/professional-pastry-chefs-forum/4114-help-whats-cream-bavarian.html

http://www.diynetwork.com/diy/cda/article_print/0,1983,DIY_14000_2273794_ARTICLE-DETAIL-PRINT,00.html

http://community.tasteofhome.com/forums/p/612467/5048479.aspx

http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-384243-.html

Here are some highly rated recipes:

http://www.recipezaar.com/42282

http://www.recipezaar.com/3730

TIA
post #15 of 46
The only recipe link you posted that I'm familiar with is the flour frosting... one bakery I worked in ocassionally used it when someone didn't want a really sweet frosting or whipped cream. I personally have a super sweet tooth so it's not my preferred icing.

The German fondant type is based on poured fondant that has been cooked, not rolled fondant. The formula we used in class was 6 lbs sugar, 1 lb 8 oz water, 1 lb 2 oz glucose. Moisten a marble slab with water, set up steel bars to frame it. Bring the sugar and water to a boil cook to 225 degrees. Stir in warmed glucose and continue to boil the syrup until it reaches 240. Pour out onto the marble and sprinkle with water, allow to cool to 110 degrees. At that temperature you start turning it from the edges, scraping under and folding with a bench scraper. Once it begins to turn white and solidifies a bit it can be put in a mixer with a paddle until it cools.

I've never heard of the pastry cream/German type.. but I bookmarked a couple of the links you gave... It sounds wonderful!
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