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The secrets of cake carving - Page 3

post #31 of 119
A dense cake is the best starting point for a carved cake, in my experience. I have a sour cream pound cake recipe that stays moist but holds it's shape when carved. I do like to completely cool the cake before wrapping and freezing. Carving while it's thawing then wrapping and icing it the next day is a great idea that I am going to try!
Pam
post #32 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamacc

Wow Diane! I like your new cakes!! The puppy is really cute. icon_smile.gif What method do you use for getting the BC smooth over curved shapes? You do a great job getting it smooth!

Courtney


Thanks! I notice you have a similar puppy in your gallery! LOL! I use a slightly thinned crusting buttercream and just go over it with pieces of Viva paper towel. Sometimes I get fabulous results - like the puppy - and sometimes the icing starts to crack before I'm finished smoothing. GRRRRR!

I also use WASC for my sculpted cakes. If chocolate is requested, I use a chocolate pound cake.

I wish I had taken your advice re carving one day and decorating the next. It took upwards of 3 hours to carve my dragon cake and I stayed up until 2am decorating it. Tearing apart and redoing the tail 4 times may have slowed me a down just a tad. icon_eek.gif I'm just finishing up the decorations this morning. It's pouring rain and the temperature is plummeting. It will be a miracle if this thing survives and the party isn't called off.
post #33 of 119
I am by no means, a guru, but I do a lot of carved cakes and most of all the tips I pick up from here on CC.

I always carve when the cakes are frozen. If the cake thaws too much while I'm carving, I'll refreeze and wait again, because if the cake starts thawing too much, it can start moving and my knife will have a tendency to push the cake instead of cutting it, which can deform the shape and make it really hard to get the shape you're looking for.

The best way is to work kinda like wood sculptors work--go for the big shapes first, then work on smaller ideas. If you're doing, for example, some sort of animal, rough out the big blobs for the head and body, then work on carving away some of the body to form the limbs and some of the head away to form the right nose, etc.

It's almost always better to take away cake than add it on, so it's a good idea to kinda "whittle" down the cake if you're not sure of where to cut--just start cutting layers away a bit at a time until you can start seeing the shape you're going for. Once you have done a few cakes, you'll get better at visualizing where to take cake away, so you won't have to whittle as much, but there's no harm in going slow if you're not sure. You'll also start to get a better idea of what kind of shape you need to start with--i.e. start stacking squares to get a rough outline of a truck instead of a big rectangle--so that you waste less cake when you carve (although the scraps can always go to make cake balls!)

If you really do have to add on (sometimes, for small protruding objects like ears or the smoke stack on a train, it's far better to carve a small piece of cake to the right shape and then add it on), then use something to glue the pieces together--I usually use buttercream. Push the pieces together really well, then freeze again--the pressure from you pushing on the piece will have thawed the cake, not to mention that freezing will help set the buttercream faster so you can carve on the new piece without knocking it off the bigger cake.

If it's a really complex 3D design (or if you're really scared of not getting it right), it can help to either print out pictures or sketch pictures of what you're carving, especially pictures that are exact front, left or top views (multiple ones are even better, because you can compare the cake to your pictures as you go).

I wrap my cakes right from the pan into saran wrap and freeze. I put a crumb coat on the cake before it thaws, and stick it in the fridge to thaw and "sweat" (which it really doesn't) then I apply the final coat of buttercream. Wrapping my cakes in saran wrap keeps them moist, but frosting them before the cakes thaw is the key to keeping the moistness in.
post #34 of 119
What a great thread! icon_biggrin.gif
To find "THE RECIPE LINKS ARE HERE" thread, click on "Forums", then "Recipes" and it's the first sticky. Latest updates are on (the bottom of) page 10 here: http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopic-625803-135.html
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To find "THE RECIPE LINKS ARE HERE" thread, click on "Forums", then "Recipes" and it's the first sticky. Latest updates are on (the bottom of) page 10 here: http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopic-625803-135.html
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post #35 of 119
Not sure if this was mentioned or not... I've noticed a HUGE difference in what kind of knife I use when I carve any kind of cake.

I invested in a more expensive brand serrated knife, (I think I spend $15-20 for it),but it does end up better carving quality.

I usually let my cakes cool for about 1/2 hr, then carve. I usually use pudding in my mixes, but I don't if I'm carving. The extra pudding makes the cakes crumble so much you can't do anything with it.
post #36 of 119
I really will have to save this line in the forum. I love the knowlegde that lives here. Way to go CCr's.
Debi Ashwood
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Debi Ashwood
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post #37 of 119
Wow thanks for this thread, I am learning so much icon_smile.gif
post #38 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Janette

I learned on CC I forgot where I went on the site but it was a picture by picture. It really helped me.



it might be the pillow cake in the article section. it shows step by step how to carve the pillow cake. I think we need one on purses too! thumbs_up.gif
P.S. this is what part of the alphabet would look like if Q and R were eliminated
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P.S. this is what part of the alphabet would look like if Q and R were eliminated
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post #39 of 119
Quote:
Quote:


I usually let my cakes cool for about 1/2 hr, then carve. I usually use pudding in my mixes, but I don't if I'm carving. The extra pudding makes the cakes crumble so much you can't do anything with it.



tamrks, how do you adapt the recipe if you add pudding to a box mix?????
"It's not about who you've known the longest, it's about who came and never left your side."

***http://docs.google.com/Doc?id=df4f9hbq_46cs9f28fs***
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"It's not about who you've known the longest, it's about who came and never left your side."

***http://docs.google.com/Doc?id=df4f9hbq_46cs9f28fs***
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post #40 of 119
steffla,

If I use pudding, I add about 1/3 cup more oil and approx 1/3-1/2 cup of milk. Some people add extra eggs & water, I don't.

After adding the milk, check the batter for thickness.. I've noticed after I've added the pudding, the batter gets very thick, and I add the milk to "water" it down. You may need to add more than specified if the batter is still too thick. The cake, in my experience, doesn't cook right if the batter is too thick.

People love the moistness of the cake with the pudding. Yum!
Let me know if you have any other questions. I got the idea of adding the pudding from this site!!
HTH!! icon_biggrin.gif
post #41 of 119
I am just starting to really get into the carving. I am not an expert, but I think they have turned out pretty good so far. I also carve them frozen and use a dense cake. I put bc between the layers and start to carve right away. The think that has helped me is to figure out before hand where I am going to cut, sketch it out and do some measurements. That way youre not just hacking away at the cake aimlessly. Afterwards I put on a crumbcoat. I dont worry that it isnt thawed yet. but I do wait (usually until the next day to finish and cover with fondant.)
post #42 of 119
What an awesome thread!
post #43 of 119
Thank you for this fantastic thread! icon_biggrin.gif
post #44 of 119
Hey has anyone seen that "Sonic Blade" thing on TV? I wondered if it would be good for carving cake..... I don't own it and am not advertising for it, just wondered if it would be good.....

http://www.sonicblade.com/
post #45 of 119
steffla, I know you're trying to be helpful.

However, (let this be a gentle reminder) you can't cut and paste content from another website and post it here, even if you credit the source as it's a violation of copyright.

You can provide a link to the subject matter with a descriptive header citing the source.

Sarah Phillips is particularly protective of her site as it has PAYING sponsors which CC does not and we don't want to create any sticky "situations" for Jackie and Heath.

Sorry for this interruption.
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