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The secrets of cake carving - Page 2

post #16 of 119
The only time I have had the plastic wrap melt just a little was when the pan touched it as I turned out the cake. I use the Wilton recipe for pan grease and my cakes always pop out easily. I also unwrap the cakes to thaw. Sometimes there will be ice crystals and I brush them off or if there are some that won't come off I blot with a papertowel before I decorate. And I don't usually wait until they have completely thawed before I start. I only use DH cake mix. Butter Recipe and Devils Food. I have never had anyone ask for other flavors. In the south we are pretty much just meat and potatoes.
A question I have is are cake mix cakes heavy enough to handle fondant? I think my choc would be because I add pudding and choc syrup but I'm not sure about buttercake. I haven't use fondant yet because most people around here think they don't like it. But I am really wanting to try MMF. Would the cake have to be completely thawed to use MMF?
post #17 of 119
Kath
I freeze most of my mudcakes because i find that they are more moist when they are defrosted. But when i carve my cakes I never carve them frozen, I also never carve them fresh out of the oven cause they fall apart. I find that if Im short on time, the soonest they can be carved is the day after baking and it's best if they are cold. This works well for me icon_biggrin.gif
cheers
Nati
post #18 of 119
I'm not a cake carving guru, but I've done it before!!! I ALWAYS freeze my cakes!! I let the cake cool some (almost room temperature, but they've been warm) and then wrap it about 5 times with Saran Wrap!! My husband loves how they taste when they are thawed out, he says I should always use pudding in the cake or bake from scratch and I should always freeze them for a least 24 hours!!!

As far as carving a cake is concerned; just do it!!! On last night's episode of "Ace of Cakes", Duff said, Don't be afraid of the cake, don't let it intimidate you!! If you have to smash it to get the shape you want, then do it!! (He's smashing the cake and smacking it as he's saying this)

While he was doing this, I kind of figured that's my problem; scared to "hurt" (mishandle from fear of it breaking) the cake!! HTH icon_biggrin.gif
I dream about cakes and stilettos!!
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I dream about cakes and stilettos!!
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post #19 of 119
Thank you Kathy! icon_redface.gif

That's a good tip from TooMuchCake.

When I was carving a milk-shake, (Pop Tate's/Archie cake) I forgot about reducing the size. Then once I added the buttercream and the fondant it looked ridiculous! I had to strip off the icing and start over.

Karen
post #20 of 119
I'm no expert, but I've done a fair bit of carving. I prefer my cake chilled, not frozen solid. You really can't carve anything that's frozen solid! Sometimes I frig overnight or I'll pop the cake into the freezer for a couple of hours.

For less intricate carving, I prefer the cake at room temp. I always use a dense, sour cream recipe and I never carve the cake the same day it's baked. I always fill with buttercream before I carve, too.

I do the crumbcoat as soon as possible, while the cake is still chilled (if applicable). I can then add the final fondant or buttercream coating because I don't freeze the cakes solid.

I've added a couple of carved cakes to my gallery so you can determine what my advice is worth. icon_wink.gif
post #21 of 119
Thread Starter 
All great ideas & suggestions, thanks so much to you all.

Diane thanks for posting your carved cakes amazing but even MORE amazing is how you get you buttercream so smooth over a carved shape it looks like fondant. That is mind blowing to me (someone who cant even get a flat round cake smooth!) icon_cry.gif .
post #22 of 119
This has been so enlightening for me. I am no carving expert either and my best advice about it is "avoid it at all costs!" ha ha ha icon_lol.gif I know my own limits and I won't lose sleep over something that gives me a headache. Though reading all these tips I think that I am going to be less hard on myself and be more open in future....maybe! I can carve round, square and anything non specific. I so admire the car cakes on this site and would love to have the confidence to do it too. My excuse is I am too busy modelling.....with paste, not on the catwalk! I'm saving this post for future reference and when I make my first car I'll sure let you all know....don't hold your breath! thumbs_up.gif

As for you Kathryn, you'll do it no problem! icon_wink.gif
post #23 of 119
i am like all of you i frezze my cakes, i put the hot cake in the frezzer for about 2 hours uncovered then torte in the middle because this is easier to do when its not forzen, then i wrap in frezzer foil and no frezzer burnt or complaints to date "Knock on wood" i am no carving expert i have only done one so far but the one thing i did learn is i carved the cake semi frozen which i had no problem but then i brain farted and appied the fondat to a semi frozen cake and let it sit overnight because it was a class project cake and when i woke up in the moring the cake had thawed out and the fondant settled and made this huge very noticble bubble in the cake icon_cry.gif
post #24 of 119
icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif I'm so sorry but this last comment made me laugh! This post is well worth being a keepsake! It's cheered me up no end. icon_lol.gif
post #25 of 119
Cakeladydi,

I have used Betty Crocker cake mix and put fondant (Satin Ice) on it with no problems. The cake mix was Choc Fudge. You could always try. I thought the same thing about people and fondant but the cake I did last July, I made sure that I had buttercream under the fondant and it was ok. I figured if people didn't like the fondant than they could take it off and still have buttercream. Guess what they ate the fondant as well which the Bride was very surprised tht they did. She insisted that they have frosting on them, didn't want fondant but caved.
post #26 of 119
I've carved quite a few cakes and have kind of got a system going now. I give myself two days to do a carved cake-one night to carve and the next to decorate.

I take all the frozen cakes out of my freezer and arrange them on the board just to get a feel for how it's all going to come together. Then I start carving and stacking up the cakes where I want them. I start cutting with the cakes completely frozen but they thaw out fairly quickly. Once the carving is done I cover the cake un-iced in saran wrap to sit overnight and thaw. I haven't had good luck with fondant on frozen cakes, so I like to wait a day. The next day I ice in buttercream, then cover with fondant and finish decorating. This works pretty well b/c the frozen cakes get to "settle" overnight before icing and covering. Also, If the cake is carved in an intricate shape then I might ice the cake with a large basketweave tip used like the cake icer tip.

I use the WASC recipe all the time for carving and it usually works fine and tastes yummy. The only time I've had problems is when I'm trying to cover a shape that's wide on top and narrower at the bottom. The WASC cake is just not firm enough to support fondant on this shape. For example, my topsy turvy and baby in a cradle cakes were starting to sag a little from the fondant pulling the cake down.

Happy carving!
Courtney
Courtney
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Courtney
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post #27 of 119
Wow Diane! I like your new cakes!! The puppy is really cute. icon_smile.gif What method do you use for getting the BC smooth over curved shapes? You do a great job getting it smooth!

Courtney
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Courtney
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post #28 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamacc

I've carved quite a few cakes and have kind of got a system going now. I give myself two days to do a carved cake-one night to carve and the next to decorate.

I take all the frozen cakes out of my freezer and arrange them on the board just to get a feel for how it's all going to come together. Then I start carving and stacking up the cakes where I want them. I start cutting with the cakes completely frozen but they thaw out fairly quickly. Once the carving is done I cover the cake un-iced in saran wrap to sit overnight and thaw. I haven't had good luck with fondant on frozen cakes, so I like to wait a day. The next day I ice in buttercream, then cover with fondant and finish decorating. This works pretty well b/c the frozen cakes get to "settle" overnight before icing and covering. Also, If the cake is carved in an intricate shape then I might ice the cake with a large tip used like the cake icer tip.

I use the WASC recipe all the time for carving and it usually works fine and tastes yummy. The only time I've had problems is when I'm trying to cover a shape that's wide on top and narrower at the bottom. The WASC cake is just not firm enough to support fondant on this shape. For example, my topsy turvy and baby in a cradle cakes were starting to sag a little from the fondant pulling the cake down.

Happy carving!
Courtney



What does WASC mean?
post #29 of 119
WASC is White Almond Sour Cream cake. It's a really yummy doctored mix cake. I doctor it even more and use yellow cake and vanilla extract. The recipe is posted here on CC. icon_smile.gif

Courtney
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Courtney
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post #30 of 119
I'm sitting here with pen in hand taking notes on all the great tips. Thanks "boring" for the info and "mamacc" for the recipe tips. It is good to hear from someone that a recipe is "really yummy". I'm gonna have to give it a try. Everyone is so good about offering their expertise and advise. I really appreciate it.

Diane
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