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Longest Disaster Story Ever. Please Help. - Page 6

post #76 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth0209

I'd like to add that I've made it a practice to be just as conscientious about sending letters of glowing praise when people do things well. I think we forget to do that and it means so much to people when they receive those. I figure it's only fair to praise as generously as we might complain.



Very good point! I must say that I really make an effort to compliment good service. Being in the food industry, I am VERY critical when I go out to eat (my family HATES going to a restaurant with me!). Hubby and I have both spent much of our professional time in customer service management, so we make a point of calling the manager to our table to compliment excellent service. (And when we ask for the manager, we make sure to tell the waiter/waitress ".....it's a GOOD thing!" so they don't stress out! icon_lol.gif )
post #77 of 99
i am very proud of you that you didnt walk out earlier and just forget the whole thing. that was a horrible experience and i think the lady that was talking about your cake was a B**** she could not have done something as amazing as you did. that was very good of you to take that from her. im truly sorry for the inconvenience and i wish you the best of luck. icon_sad.gif
sometimes i wonder... "Why is that Frizbee Getting Bigger?" ... and then it hits me.
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sometimes i wonder... "Why is that Frizbee Getting Bigger?" ... and then it hits me.
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post #78 of 99
Just my two cents worth on the chef's coat issue: I've taken pastry classes at the San Francisco Culinary Academy, but have no certificate. They sell the full chef's coats, pants, shoes, etc. in the shop at the school. I don't think there's anything "shady" about wearing the chef's coat but I would NEVER wear a chef's hat (not that pastry chefs usually wear them anyway). It seems that may be a distinction, hat if you've graduated and are a full chef. The coats are supposed to protect your clothes and keep you clean more than anything . . . also, I'd never have the word "chef" put on the coat unless a graduate. What do the rest of you think?
post #79 of 99
I agree with not using "chef" but as far as I knew, hats were to help keep hair out and since they are sold to pretty much anyone I don't see why people can't wear them. Many on here could get a job as a pastry chef based on their experience alone.
post #80 of 99
To wear a chef's coat, one should somehow be in the food business in some manner... the kitchen workers wear them as well as the executive chef... you can be an executive chef if you own the restaurant and decide that will be your title.

There are many famous chefs who have never gone to culinary school ... one that most would recognize is Wolfgang Puck. He wears jackets and I have seen pictures of him with a hat... he worked as an apprentice in many restaurants, but never went to culinary arts school. He does not have a college degree, but is an astute businessman.

You do not need to have certain criteria before you put on a chef's coat... it is a uniform, which designates what business you are in.

If a culinary arts school tells you that you must have a degree from their school before you can wear a coat and a hat, you need to go elsewhere. They do not know of what they speak. Now, they can get all uppity if they want, but those who do, have no formal education, just ego.

Basically, one can be a professional chef if someone hires them to be one. Most require you work from the bottom to the top, but there is a hierarchy which is self-imposed in each particular kitchen.

So, wear your coat with pride. You are the owner of your own food establishment... you are the chef!
post #81 of 99
Last year I worked under a pastry chef who started in the food business at age 16 and worked his way up, but no formal food education. But he was a "chef".
post #82 of 99
I so remember feeling like an imposter!! I had this feeling that I would show up with a cake and people would find me out... that I was just some lady pretending to be a cake decorator. Okay, it was only like 4 months ago... I think getting through 22 weddings in May made me get over it and know that I'm not faking anything... skillz... I haz dem.
Alison
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Alison
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post #83 of 99
Cake was beautiful, and quite frankly, even a big crack down the back would not necessarily be noticed by anyone who doesn't have an interest in decorating cakes (and I don't think that was the bad of a crack). My 3 year old got at his birthday cake and there were four places where he ran his fingers through the icing on the sides, border and all. I decided not to get upset, since it was his cake, and I didn't even fix it. NO ONE NOTICED until I pointed it out to them. Obviously not as significant as a wedding cake, but you get the idea.

Do send the letter. Besides the rudeness, she should have shown you the correct place to put the cake to begin with; she practically refused the delivery of the cake -- how would the bride have liked to have NO cake?; and she should NOT have touched the cake -- was she certain that the flowers were food safe? Did she wash her hands before touching the cake? Did she verify the design change she imposed on your cake (honestly, I don't see how you could put flowers all over it -- it was already perfect). Good grief. I would take advantage of the person who offered to proof your letter, since it will be difficult for you to write it without the emotion. Or you could be passive aggressive and "helpful" -- instead of complaining about those things, helpfully mention that perhaps she was not aware that . . . the cake cannot be moved multiple times, etc etc.

And I think you showed lots of backbone by not apologizing -- good for you.

Margaret
post #84 of 99
Oh, I can only HOPE that I get to deal with some crazy ho-bag like that woman. I like to be the one to put rude, self-righteous people in their places.

I would've been like "This is my job and you are intruding on my job. I don't come down here while you're working and try to tell you what to do. So you WILL step off or we will have words."

Your cake is fabulous, you just need the pride and honor to stand up for it and your talent. Never let some uninformed nobody make you think you don't know what you're doing. You must know SOMETHING or else you wouldn't be getting orders for cakes!

Darci
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post #85 of 99
After reading everyone's responses, each time I got a sick feeling in my stomach. We do not need to come down to this type of person's level... the simplest response is to be prepared as professionals should be. Always know the exact place you are to bring your cake before dragging it around to every table/room in the place... ask to see the designated cake receiver person before you bring it in... have them sign off on the cake delivery... and get out of there. You have filled your contract.

Now, this particular woman was totally not professional... you should simply have asked, "And you are?..." Your response should have been, "i am sorry, but you are not designated by the bride to have any opinion. This is her wedding and this is how she contracted this portion of it".

Then, you ask to speak to the manager of the place... keep your composure and take care of the matter at that moment. Do not wait hours, days, weeks, and write letters. Take care of the problem immediately.

You simply tell these ego-driven people that you wish to speak to their superiors and will not leave until they come. This saves grief for everyone... plus it provides a learning lesson for the wicked witch that this is unacceptable behavior from any human being and you are a going to give her a loving lesson in how all of us should act.

This will come back to bite you if you get someone in trouble... it always does. Simply pick up the phone and call the manager of the establishment and let him know, in your most professional voice and without the kids screaming in the background, that you had a unfortunate situation with one of his employees. You ask for an appointment with him and his employee to get the matter straightened out so it will not happen again.

That woman may be the only support for her family and maybe she was PMSing that day... I am not on her side, but as professionals, we do not have the right to come down to these people's lack of social graces.

It is time we all quit screaming to get a situation solved. A generation ago we would not have had this problem... it is time to return to civility.

I can tell you, without a doubt, that I have never run into a person who acted like that for very long, because I look down my nose at them and ask them their qualifications for trying to attack me in such a horrible manner. If you state you can see they are having a "horrible day", they will back off of whatever they are trying to do to you.

Be the better person. Go into the place and meet with them eye-to-eye. You will always get the upper hand, and you will establish yourself as a true professional... not a raving lunatic.

Sorry, I think all of you are wrong for wanting to write letters. Confront the problem head-on and quit hiding behind the pen.
post #86 of 99
Oh, and the phrase "Who are you and what do you do here?" leaves many sputtering. It works nicely.

Darci
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post #87 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by lutie

That woman may be the only support for her family and maybe she was PMSing that day... I am not on her side, but as professionals, we do not have the right to come down to these people's lack of social graces.

It is time we all quit screaming to get a situation solved. A generation ago we would not have had this problem... it is time to return to civility.

I can tell you, without a doubt, that I have never run into a person who acted like that for very long, because I look down my nose at them and ask them their qualifications for trying to attack me in such a horrible manner. If you state you can see they are having a "horrible day", they will back off of whatever they are trying to do to you.

Be the better person. Go into the place and meet with them eye-to-eye. You will always get the upper hand, and you will establish yourself as a true professional... not a raving lunatic.

Sorry, I think all of you are wrong for wanting to write letters. Confront the problem head-on and quit hiding behind the pen.



I'm sorry, but I hardly think writing a letter regarding a rude employee makes someone a raving lunatic. Now if that letter involves demanding this person be fired or some other such irrational statement, then perhaps 'raving lunatic' is appropriate.

Personally I would take someone coming to complain face to face as a much more aggresive action, almost to the point of wanting a confrontation. A letter still gets the point across and no feels threatened. As long as the letter is professionally worded and not overly dramatic, I think it is a proportional response.

Darci
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post #88 of 99
I haven't read everything, but I would have to agree with the letter. It's not hiding behind anything, but WRITTEN PROOF that something was done. With this WRITTEN document they can not say they never talked to you or anything like that.

I used to work in customer service at a retail store and when someone would complain we would tell them to fill out the complaint card because

1. I was just CS - not the manager, I had not higher authority to do something,

2. if it was a legitimate complaint the managers had written proof they could reference

3. letters are taken more seriously than a phone call.
Cake decorating ROCKS!!
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Cake decorating ROCKS!!
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post #89 of 99
... and a face-to-face meeting makes a lasting impression and does not get misplaced on someone's desk or file 13. Sorry, but if you are sincere in being treated like a professional, then you need to act like one and take the bull by the horns. Make sure both the employee and the employer are present when you present your case... the denials from the employee will just boost your case. Bring your letter with you so they will have your complaint in writing.

Present it to the employer personally. Absentee griping, whether by phone or letter, is not the same as a face-to-face contact. They will know how serious you were because you took the time to make an appointment out of your busy schedule (or just show up!) because this was definitely important to you.
post #90 of 99
Some people are just mean. Instead of trying to help you, or at least stay out of your way she went and made matters worse. And why? There is no reason.

The cake was beautiful though, so different and fun!
~Alicia
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