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Do I avoid the "do you use a mix" question?? - Page 7

post #91 of 246
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaisieBake

If you want to talk about all this in terms of class issues--and that's where you're going, Doug--this discussion is going to become very uncomfortable very quicky.


Unfortunately, it IS women who tend to have "the attitude" about all of this. I rarely hear men debating this issue. See my previous post (about page 4?) on why it's an issue to start with ... because women looked upon their culinary skills as a status thing and their greatest tool to "ketch a man".

As I've said a number of times, women are their own worst enemy.

It's probably why I have more men friends than women friends.
post #92 of 246
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

I rarely hear men debating this issue.



we've learned to keep our mouth shut.....

that or too busy stuffing it w/ cake!
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post #93 of 246
Quote:
Originally Posted by k8memphis

Quote:
Originally Posted by MaisieBake

Quote:
Quote:

the snobby doyen dilettantes who fancy themselves ever so "cultured" and get all snooty



Uppity women! That's so lovely to hear from a man in a group of women.

If you want to talk about all this in terms of class issues--and that's where you're going, Doug--this discussion is going to become very uncomfortable very quicky.



But that's the point. It IS a class issue maybe not with the exact people Doug mentioned but it is a class issue. It's like a jr high school issue.

I think the majority of us would agree that it matters not at all in the grand scheme of things but it still is a definite factor influencing many many business' some who make millions of dollars a year. It's irrefutable.

It's the emperor's new clothes somehow--both scratch and mix.

And if we each one of us don't let the discussion go downhill it won't go downhill.

There's uppity men too.



ok....drop "doyen" and then that part applies equally to both sexes.

add references to ---- any stuffy butler and...

Hmmmm.....can't for the life of me, with the exception of Prof. Henry Higgins (Pygmalion, My Fair Lady --- love his mother's retort when he shows up unexpectedly: "Perfectly DREADFUL surprise!" -- even his own mother can't stand him) come up w/ male embodiments of "uppity" beyond the classic butler.

sad to say, but even in the mass media, the image of "uppity" is almost always portrayed/personified using a woman --- I wonder why.

---

as for class issue....

well dilettantes cut across all classes.

you can have NASCAR ones

you can dirt bike ones

you can have redneck ones

opera/ballet/symphony ones

theatre ones (oh don't I know that one!)

snobbery is found in all classes.

----

it's more a simple --- I've got to find some way to feel superior to and dismissive of "you"

that knows no class

it is classless
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post #94 of 246
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug

it's more a simple --- I've got to find some way to feel superior to and dismissive of "you"

that knows no class

it is classless


Doug, you are one class act! thumbs_up.gif
post #95 of 246
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug

it's more a simple --- I've got to find some way to feel superior to and dismissive of "you"

that knows no class

it is classless


Doug, you are one class act! thumbs_up.gif



icon_redface.gif

and you are too! thumbs_up.gif



(well, what do you expect from a drama teacher! --- tho' temporarily "class-less" for the summer! icon_rolleyes.gif )
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post #96 of 246
I agree Lutie. I still don't think the mix should be advertised or openly visible but if it comes up, let the client choose. Be velrsatile, agreeable and be able to do both scratch and mix well.
post #97 of 246
Quote:
Quote:

Hmmmm.....can't for the life of me, with the exception of Prof. Henry Higgins (Pygmalion, My Fair Lady --- love his mother's retort when he shows up unexpectedly: "Perfectly DREADFUL surprise!" -- even his own mother can't stand him)



Oooh, I love the movie My Fair Lady, I'm getting my kids into "old" movies and they are realizing the "new" movies are basically made from the "old" ones. Just like their music. Hum, go figure, mom and dad were cool one time....a long time ago. Doug, now I'm going to have to rent the movie tonight! Maybe watch it with some box made cupcakes. Yummy! icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif
Child & Home Engineer
Lin
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post #98 of 246
Wow. In the time I started the post and the time I finsihed posting...

Crap! Where is my coat and boots?
post #99 of 246
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug

Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

I rarely hear men debating this issue.



we've learned to keep our mouth shut.....

that or too busy stuffing it w/ cake!



Hehehehe Doug.

Mike
post #100 of 246
jkalman I agree

maisebaker... you are funny. The reality is that the only one who really ever gets offended by these threads are those who choose to use box mixes. If a scratch baker is asked they dont get defensive... asking did you mill the cobblestone for the road you drive on... but proudly proclaim that they are scratch bakers. I think the expectation is that the product that the customer is purchasing is a fresh compilation of ingredients vs box thats why they ask. The whole walmart uses premade or frozen doesnt hold water to me. Usually if someone is shoppin for a boutique style cake there is a certain expectation. I just dont get the defensiveness like a previous poster said if you use box mixes ... use 'em and be proud of it. If there is nothing indeed wrong with it dont hide the boxes... give your spiel about the baked with love .... i start with a mix and add tender kisses. MHO
post #101 of 246
Best reply- MY recipe is just that, my recipe. (forget the box/ scratch thing).

Question- "Do you use a mix?"
Answer- "Sorry, I don't share my recipes."

Question, "But do you bake from scratch?"
Answer- "Sorry, I spent years perfecting my methods and recipes and just don't discuss them. I'm glad you like the taste."
post #102 of 246
I don't have a shop and I sell only 1-2 cakes per week max, but here's my reply if a customer asks. And it's very rare that they do. "Some of my cakes are from scratch, (like pound cake, carrot cake, german choc) and others are made with recipes that include a cake mix as an ingredient along with add'l flour, sugar, sour cream, flavorings, etc."

Just for convenience sake I've been considering repackaging my cake mixes in ziploc bags w/the dry ingredients called for in the enhanced recipe I use so that when I'm ready to bake, all I need to do is get out the eggs, butter, sour cream. Any little short cuts help around our crazy house. This would eliminate having cake boxes sitting around your shop, which looks lovely BTW.
Sally

CHILDREN...Love them, Nurture them, Teach them well, and Believe in them...for they are our future.
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Sally

CHILDREN...Love them, Nurture them, Teach them well, and Believe in them...for they are our future.
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post #103 of 246
Wow! This does seem like a touchy subject! I am new to decorating and have tried some scratch, some doctored mixes, and some plain mix recipes. I have found success with all three. I have thought about using a variety if I ever make it to the business level. I think that people who come to a "cake designer" want something special and different from the grocery store cake. They want a custom cake that is delicious and beautiful. I would like my product to showcase my talent by being memorable in all aspects.

I think that baking from scratch gives me a knowledge about baking that helps me create a unique product. I think that cake mix gives convenience and a consistent product that is reliable (no "night before the wedding" disasters). I say "Whatever works for you and keeps the customers coming back!"

If you are being honest, and your cakes are yummy and unique, people will come to you for cakes! I really believe it is that simple. I see no reason to hide or be ashamed of your techniques. If you notice you are losing business because you are telling about or exposing your cake mix, then it's time to rethink your options. That's what businesses do! Good luck to you in your beautiful new kitchen!!
post #104 of 246
I use a box mix as by base and add many things from there. When people ask me, I say, I use the box mix as my dry ingredients, because so many recipes call for cake flour and that is much more expensive than a box mix. I use the extender recipe I got here on this site, to help give my recipes a more home made texture. I don't think I save time by using the box mix, because I have to sift the box mix, which is harder to sift than from scratch ingredients. Truth be told, when I want a really good tasting cake, just for my consumption, I use a box only. I love the taste. I just like the texture of the home made cakes (less crummy). And you know, I'm not going to apologize for my decision. I just want a high quality product and a reasonable price, and if I get it from a box , oh well.
post #105 of 246
Quote:
Originally Posted by disubu

They want a custom cake that is delicious and beautiful.



That's pretty much what they get from me..... a custom cake made just for them that is delicious and beautiful!
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