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Moist cake mix cakes - Page 3

post #31 of 89
PLEASE HELP icon_cry.gif
I tried the coffee cream idea, but my edges came out dry. What did I do wrong? I believe I used butter instead of oil. Do I start with a pudding cake mix, oil cake mix or butter recipe cake mix? What brand of cake mix did you use? I prefer Duncan Hines, but I will use Bettry Crocker in a bind or to try a new flavor they might have. I really love this idea there are some great flavors of cream. I'm wanting more cake orders so I can try them all.

PLEASE HELP icon_biggrin.gif
post #32 of 89
Not sure. I automatically bake my cakes at 325 instead of 350. That helps ALL cakes.

Don't trash that cake!!!! Just use simple syrup around the edges where it's dry. It will fix it up in a jiffy. REALLYY!!!!
post #33 of 89
Thank you, I have 3 cakes for this weekend. I will try again

icon_biggrin.gif
post #34 of 89
Thread Starter 
here is the website for the cake mix doctor: www.cakemixdoctor.com
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"To solve any problem, here are three questions to ask yourself: First, what could I do? Second, what could I read? And third, who could I ask? ~ John Rohn"
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"To solve any problem, here are three questions to ask yourself: First, what could I do? Second, what could I read? And third, who could I ask? ~ John Rohn"
"Action is the foundational key to all success. ~ Pablo Picasso"
Reply
post #35 of 89
You use butter instead of oil. Do you melt the butter, then? Thank you. icon_smile.gif
post #36 of 89
I'm not sure who you're asking, TenderHeart. But I can give you may response.

I use butter in place of oil for most cakes. If I have forgotten to allow the butter to come to room temperature, I throw it in the microwave for a few seconds. It's very soft but still cool to the touch.

If I happen to over-nuke it, I just let is sit a few minutes (doesn't take long) until it's cooled down enough. It can be lukewarm, just not hot.
post #37 of 89
You were the one I was asking, yes, I thought I had included your name in my subject line when I posted, sorry about that. icon_smile.gif Thanks for explaining. icon_smile.gif
post #38 of 89
Cali4dawn,
Can you please share your simple syrup recipe and basic directions for using it???

Thanks!
post #39 of 89
Thanks a million for all of the info. I must have previously missed this conversation. I agree completely on paying for what you want and everything coming at a price. If you really want to stand out from the pack. I have had people ask why is your cake so expensive, Wal-Mart is cheaper.....then go to Wal-Mart! If you can get what I make at Wal-Mart, then I am doing something wrong. Most of my clients say it's the best cake they have ever tasted! So I know there is a difference.

I'm not from the south and buying your cake at the same place you get your tires, is not my idea of a good bakery cake thumbsdown.gif . It's fine for the people who enjoy it, but I like going to a bakery and getting a cake. Anyway, sorry to get off track.

I think the coffee creamer is a great idea. I'm going to try that on my next experiment. thumbs_up.gif

Thanks for listening to my ranting!
post #40 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tracey4

Cali4dawn,
Can you please share your simple syrup recipe and basic directions for using it???

Thanks!



Basic Simple Syrup is used when you just want to make a cake moist but not change its flavor. For a standard 9*13 or (2) 8-9 inch rounds: Boil 1 cup of water. Add 1 cup table sugar (white sugar). Dissolve all sugar. Allow to cool. Can be used warm, just not boiling hot.

I use a pastry brush, some people use a squeeze bottle to use it o the cake. Using a pastry brush just keep brushing it on all over the cake (or where ever you need it) until it's all gone. If you using a squeeze bottle, do the same. Yo may need all of it, but don;t be afraid of using that much on your cake. It really won't hurt a dry cake.

Now all that being said....

You can also use coffee syrups, fruit juices and a slew of other products. I've also used watered down jams. Obviously this will change the flavor of your cakes. With the exception of the watered down jams, do not add boiling water. Just use as is. Oh yeah! Fancy Liqueurs such as Bailey's, Kahlua, Amaretto, etc also work great!!
post #41 of 89
Thanks Dawn!
You're always such a great help!

Is that to be used only for dry cakes, or can it be used on a moist cake to add flavour??
post #42 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mchelle

I'm not from the south and buying your cake at the same place you get your tires, is not my idea of a good bakery cake.



Ouch thumbsdown.gif
Agreeing with the second half of your statement, just not so sure about the first.....
post #43 of 89
Sorry, I don't mean to offend anyone. icon_redface.gif
post #44 of 89
Quote:
Quote:

Mchelle wrote:
I'm not from the south and buying your cake at the same place you get your tires, is not my idea of a good bakery cake.


Ouch
Agreeing with the second half of your statement, just not so sure about the first.....




I'm afraid I have to agree with Midwestmom on this one.

I am from the south, but am not compelled to buy tires and cake together! icon_biggrin.gif
Chicken noodle soup, chicken noodle soup, chicken noodle soup with a soda on the side!!!
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Chicken noodle soup, chicken noodle soup, chicken noodle soup with a soda on the side!!!
Reply
post #45 of 89
I guess that I should clarify myself and in the future not make a broad statement. I certainly did not mean to imply that all southerns buy cakes with their tires. I am only speaking of the people I have happen to have this conversation with. Definately not every Southerner. Please excuse me, again I apologize.
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