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Moist cake mix cakes

post #1 of 89
Thread Starter 
Instead of using water as the directions on the box state- use milk. For those that may have a dairy allergy, use half soymilk/half water or half rice milk/half water. I have done a lot of cooking with rice milk and found that it adds a lot of moisture to stuff. (Almost too much.) So I always take the total water required in the cake mix directions and user half water/half rice milk.
I have always done this and I get so many compliments on how moist my cake is- in fact it stays moist for days!! I had a cake that I made recently and it was left loosely covered on the counter for at least 4/5 days and it was still as moist as the day I had made it.
**This is great to do in pancakes too- makes them a little sweeter.
"To solve any problem, here are three questions to ask yourself: First, what could I do? Second, what could I read? And third, who could I ask? ~ John Rohn"
"Action is the foundational key to all success. ~ Pablo Picasso"
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"To solve any problem, here are three questions to ask yourself: First, what could I do? Second, what could I read? And third, who could I ask? ~ John Rohn"
"Action is the foundational key to all success. ~ Pablo Picasso"
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post #2 of 89
I recently discovered using coffee creamers!! I bought some CoffeeMate French Vanilla and used it in a cake mix. Along with butter in place of oil (I always do that). MMMMMMMMM!

I'm going to try the other flavors.

I've always used milk or buttermilk (even better) as long as I can remember when using a cake mix. Just made more sense to me than water. And yes, it does keep it "fresh" longer. I've had cakes and cupcakes sit on my counter for days and days (once it was two weeks and they were still fresh to the last bite!!) and be just as fresh tasting as the day they were served. And because I have discovered this method, I can make a cake a few days in advance before delivery and no one is the wiser. Cakes due on a Sunday are almost always baked and decorated on Thursday. Much less stress and worries!!
post #3 of 89
Thread Starter 
Never thought about coffee creamer- but what a great way to make a white cake have a different flavor in it thumbs_up.gif
"To solve any problem, here are three questions to ask yourself: First, what could I do? Second, what could I read? And third, who could I ask? ~ John Rohn"
"Action is the foundational key to all success. ~ Pablo Picasso"
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"To solve any problem, here are three questions to ask yourself: First, what could I do? Second, what could I read? And third, who could I ask? ~ John Rohn"
"Action is the foundational key to all success. ~ Pablo Picasso"
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post #4 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by cali4dawn

I recently discovered using coffee creamers!! I bought some CoffeeMate French Vanilla and used it in a cake mix. Along with butter in place of oil (I always do that). MMMMMMMMM!

I'm going to try the other flavors.




Amerretto is a great one. I have used that in frosting and have even added it to my ganache. YUMMMYYYYYYY
Becky D
cakeconfections@gmail.com
www.cakeconfections.net
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Becky D
cakeconfections@gmail.com
www.cakeconfections.net
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post #5 of 89
Dawn,

How much coffee creamer do you add to the cake mix?? I had never thought of using coffee creamer but sounds like a great idea, I guess I'm also chicken to experiment!!

Thanks!
~Luraleigh~
post #6 of 89
I've used creamer in my buttercream too instead of water for a bit more flavor.

Debbie
Hope your day is a piece of cake!
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Hope your day is a piece of cake!
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post #7 of 89
I added the creamer in place of water. So whatever your box calls for, that's how much. My BC recipe does not call for water unless you are thinning it. Then I've used the coffee creamers. It's just sinfully luscious!!

It does up the cost of your cakes- but man, it's worth it!!
post #8 of 89
It seems like alot of creamer or buttermilk to add since my cake box calls for 1 1/3 cups, is that right to replace the whole thing? Also, if milk is added does it not need to be refrigerated?
Thanks icon_smile.gif
post #9 of 89
Thread Starter 
I have never had a cake go bad made with milk when I is left out on the counter for long periods of time.
"To solve any problem, here are three questions to ask yourself: First, what could I do? Second, what could I read? And third, who could I ask? ~ John Rohn"
"Action is the foundational key to all success. ~ Pablo Picasso"
Reply
"To solve any problem, here are three questions to ask yourself: First, what could I do? Second, what could I read? And third, who could I ask? ~ John Rohn"
"Action is the foundational key to all success. ~ Pablo Picasso"
Reply
post #10 of 89
OK- here is where I really get on my soapbox:

Nope on the refrigeration. Sugar acts as a preservative. In fact, the milk product helps to keep it fresher longer on the counter. I have had left over cake sitting on my counter made from water get stale after a couple of days. The cakes I made using milk stay fresh for several more days.

Yes, 1 1/3 cups is a lot.. but that's what the recipe calls for.

It's all about quality. New decorators talk about cost and quantity/amount of ingredients. But it's just like any other food. You would not place a cube steak on your plate and expect it to taste like prime rib. If you want quality you're going to have to pay for it. Plain and simple.

If you want to stand out above the others, you're going to have to produce a better product. A cake is not a cake is not cake, any more than you can compare a BMW to a Yugo. Yes, they both get you there, but which gets you there in comfort?

It's not enough that your cakes are decorated better (I've tasted beautifully decorated cakes that tasted like crap or were not melt-in-my-mouth creamy). A cake also has to taste better, feel better in the mouth and stay fresher longer if you want to beat out the competition.

I use water in my cakes when I'm being cheap. I make no bones about it. But any cake that leaves my house or is served to a potential customer, gets quality ingredients.

I had to make a decision and be honest with myself. Do I want to make a beautiful on the outside, cheap on the inside cake or do I want to make a high-quality, over-all great cake and stand out above the rest?

It's really OK if you want to make a plain old tasting cake that anyone can make in their home without you. Just be honest and say so. But don't ask how to make a cake better and not want to spend more money. It's not going to happen.
post #11 of 89
Thread Starter 
Here, here! I could not agree more judge.gif
"To solve any problem, here are three questions to ask yourself: First, what could I do? Second, what could I read? And third, who could I ask? ~ John Rohn"
"Action is the foundational key to all success. ~ Pablo Picasso"
Reply
"To solve any problem, here are three questions to ask yourself: First, what could I do? Second, what could I read? And third, who could I ask? ~ John Rohn"
"Action is the foundational key to all success. ~ Pablo Picasso"
Reply
post #12 of 89
tell it like it is! thumbs_up.gif
Hope your day is a piece of cake!
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Hope your day is a piece of cake!
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post #13 of 89
Sorry folks- I can get a little wild at times!! icon_confused.gif
post #14 of 89
nothing wrong with being passionate about what you do! thumbs_up.gif
Hope your day is a piece of cake!
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Hope your day is a piece of cake!
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post #15 of 89
Thanks for the great advice, I too want to make the best that I can and I don't want to cheap out to anyone but my kids who gulp it down way too fast for anything to become stale icon_biggrin.gif
I will try my cake tomorrow with milk and see how it compares, thanks once again for the great advice thumbs_up.gif
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