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Plexiglass Cake Circles

post #1 of 32
Thread Starter 
Is anyone using or have used plexiglass cake circles instead of the cardboard ones for stacked cakes?
My thinking is I would never have to worry about the cardboard giving away, don't have to cover them with celephane, the cake won't absorb the cardboard taste and they would be very sturdy and not a recurring expense.
I just cut 4 Christmas day but was wondering if other people had tried it or what they thought about the subject .........
post #2 of 32
How is it cost wise?....sounds like a very "clean" alternative...not to mention that it probably looks great.
post #3 of 32
Thread Starter 
A sheet of plexiglass that is 18x24 inches and 9/32nd's thick (almost 1/4") cost me $13.50 and I'm going to be able to get a 12, 10, 8, 7 & 6 inch circle out of it.
There is a thinner version (that costs less) but I didn't want to take a chance with it. I'm sure it would be fine for the smaller tiers that doesn't have the European torte. Or it could always be doubled on the cake.
post #4 of 32
Great idea!!

Busy Bakin Kakes For Kids!!!

Mom to Mitchell 13 yrs and Delaney 11 yrs

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Busy Bakin Kakes For Kids!!!

Mom to Mitchell 13 yrs and Delaney 11 yrs

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post #5 of 32
The only problem I can see is, if you sell the cake how are you going to get the "circle" returned? Will it be included as part of the cake price, and not returned? Or will it be returned as part of the tier dividers, and then included in the contract? It is certain a great solution to the "blasted" cardboard circle.
post #6 of 32
Sounds like an awesome concept! You could even use a circle larger than your cake and use clear glue to decopage (sp?) some corresponding paper to the underside and it would show through! Hmmm....wheels are turning, which can be dangerous for me! icon_biggrin.gif

Diana
If at first you don't succeed, eat it and start all over!


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If at first you don't succeed, eat it and start all over!


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post #7 of 32
I used 1/4" plexiglass squares for a wedding cake once; they worked great. The problem I had was that it is extremely difficult to put them on pillars -- no feet for pillars to attach to, so you have to be very precise and careful when placing the pillars ... any deviation in proper placement can spell disaster. We used champagne flutes that had been overturned with an icing rose under the bowl of the glass ... very pretty and effective.

I still have mine, and they now are used primarily for displays, sometimes for parties we need a serving piece for. The fact they are clear, with no design whatsoever, makes them ideal for everything from birthdays to weddings to graduations to "naked mile celebration day" or whatever ...... well, you get the picture! icon_smile.gif

Personally, I like the material and the sturdiness. I just was quite concerned that someone might bump the cake table and the wedding cake would be history very easily!

Odessa
The Client doesn't generally understand the creative process we go through to make them a gorgeous confection ... it really IS more than "just" butter, eggs, and flour!
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The Client doesn't generally understand the creative process we go through to make them a gorgeous confection ... it really IS more than "just" butter, eggs, and flour!
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post #8 of 32
How easy is it to cut?
post #9 of 32
I bet you could attach something (not sure what yet) to the bottom of the plexi as a "foot" like a cake plate would have. Just use some clear silicone adhesive, like the kind for aquariums and glue it on. Aside from acting as cake plates, I do like the idea of them replacing boards.
If at first you don't succeed, eat it and start all over!


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If at first you don't succeed, eat it and start all over!


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post #10 of 32
I used plexiglass for the stork in my photos. It was a large cake and I didn't know where to get a cake board that big. It's great. I did get it back from the person I did the cake from. It's great! I didn't even this of cutting it in circles.
Oh, Bother!
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Oh, Bother!
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post #11 of 32
They have a Plexiglas glue that would "weld" Plexiglas feet and if you were ambitious you could create any style of feet if you go to a Plexiglas dealer and buy scraps.........(I did that for some sculptures I created years ago.)
Award winning cake designer and fine art sculptor.

"An artist discovers his genius the day he dares not to please." ~Andre Malraux
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Award winning cake designer and fine art sculptor.

"An artist discovers his genius the day he dares not to please." ~Andre Malraux
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post #12 of 32
Would you "sand" the edges to make it smooth? Also, what did you use to cut it? I am wondering if this could be a project for DH - he is so handy with tools!
Be generous with praise, but cautious with criticism
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Be generous with praise, but cautious with criticism
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post #13 of 32
Thread Starter 
We cut it with a scroll or jig saw (depending on what part of the country you live in), then took the rough stuff off with a sanding grinder then finished it off by hand.
We tried using a rotor and a band saw but you have more control with the scroll saw.
It cuts/burns the plexiglass, so after you cut it out you have to smack it to break it apart.
I wasn't thinking about using it for tiered cakes, just stacked cakes. And it would be included like pilars/seperator plates in the contract and would need to be returned.
I've read were people used plexigalss for the cake baord but no where have I seen anyone use it for cake circles between layers.
post #14 of 32
I've been using plexiglass for awhile and I love it except when I don't get them back! My father also cut me a hole in it so I can hang them up when I don't need them!
Stefanie
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Stefanie
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post #15 of 32
I think this is a great idea.
June
June
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June
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