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darn school! - Page 3

post #31 of 118
My daughter worked in a doctor's office and said she overheard a conversation about one theory is that it's because we are "too clean". When I was a kid, we played in the dirt, (ate dirt!), slept 3 kids to a bed, ate apples straight from the tree and grapes straight from the vine without washing the bug poop off of them, played behind the barn, in an old chicken coop, waded barefoot in a creek in the woods .... and were never sick.

Now everything is sanitized, we live in closed houses with central air and no FRESH air, kids are not exposed to germs so their immune system doesn't develop a defense against the things that cause allergies.

Just a theory .... put forth by someone in the medical field.
post #32 of 118
My son, now in high school (EEEK!), went to an elementary school that restricted home made goodies for class parties. You could send in a tray of bakery cupcakes, but not ones you had made yourself. When I did a cupcake decorating activity with the kids, I asked the local grocery bakery if they could sell me trays of uniced cupcakes and deli containers of icing. They could, and the kids had a blast.

I was able to make fun cupcakes for teacher appreciation days. (I guess it's OK to risk poisoning teachers, just not kids!) Likewise, a GREAT fund-raiser they did was a bake sale on election days. There was a polling place in the school multi-purpose room, so they would set up the bake sale between the parking lot and the MPR entrance. Several times, I had to run home and make more goodies in the afternoon, because the polls stay open until 8, and we had run out of baked goods by 4. Individual rice crispy treats, cupcakes, and RI decorated cookies were huge favorites.
One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.
- AA Milne -
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One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.
- AA Milne -
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post #33 of 118
My DD is in the 3rd grade now and we aren't able to bring treats in either. Not even store bought. Last year they told us that the birthday kids get a cupcake at lunchtime so we shouldn't bring anything in. This year they changed it to a popsicle. Oooohh...yum. icon_rolleyes.gif I understand that they want to get kids to eat healthier but instead of attacking party snacks they need to attack the school lunches. They still serve cheeseburgers and pizza. So why not stop that and let them have an occasional treat. I refuse to let my DD eat lunch at school everyday. What she eats there is the equlivalent to eating fast food everyday. I let her eat school lunch once a week and that's it. I just don't understand that logic of these schools.
post #34 of 118
I have a son in 1st grade and I'm allowed to take in treats. I also have a son in Pre-K, and I can send in baked treats, just not cupcakes. They say they are too messy. I can understand they want kids to eat healthy, but really...isn't that something they should learn at home and know that a treat every now and the nis ok? Don't even get me started on school lunches....foot long hot dogs, pizza AT LEAST once a week, corn dogs, soft pretzels as a main dish. A bunch of junk, and they only get gym once a week!
post #35 of 118
I totally agree with Indydebi - we are too clean a world now-a-days and it is ruining us! Dirt is our friend! (that's my excuse when I've been baking too much and my home is not so clean.) My kitchen is always clean though!

BTW - alanahodgson - you made me laugh!
Pastryjen

Money talks...but chocolate rocks!
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Pastryjen

Money talks...but chocolate rocks!
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post #36 of 118
I'm actually glad the schools don't let parents bring in homemade treats...you have no idea what the conditions of the house or kitchen is when someone else makes the food. Seriously though...what if it was one of those people who doesn't wash their hands after the bathroom...or thinks "oh well, the (cat or dog) licked the cake, but its only for school so I don't have to rebake...and there are at least 20-28 kids per class. Thats over 20 bdays and over 20 different parents you don't know.

And as for allergies and the restrictions...no big deal. I'm fortunate that a snack of peanut butter for my kids is not a matter of life and death. So if i have to stick to an allergy list or not let my kid eat a peanut butter sandwich , I consider it a very very small concession.
post #37 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by ge978

I'm actually glad the schools don't let parents bring in homemade treats...you have no idea what the conditions of the house or kitchen is when someone else makes the food. Seriously though...what if it was one of those people who doesn't wash their hands after the bathroom...or thinks "oh well, the (cat or dog) licked the cake, but its only for school so I don't have to rebake...and there are at least 20-28 kids per class. Thats over 20 bdays and over 20 different parents you don't know.



That's exactly what I was thinking. I remember my mother always asking us "who made it?" when it came to homemade goods and such. As kids, you don't think twice but not everyone is clean.

And it makes me think of the ADULTS I see here at work and other places, who walk out of the bathroom without washing their hands. I do not eat anything they bring in! Gross. icon_lol.gif
post #38 of 118
Indydebi's post reminded me of a poem someone sent me a while back. It was part of a chain letter, actually, but it is so true!! I found it online:

http://www.supernannyrules.com/born-before-1980-you-are-a-survivor/

Granted, I do think some changes were necessary, like car seats...

BTW, I've just received a letter listing what my son can or cannot take in a sack lunch. No PB&J!!

Lori D.
post #39 of 118
Lori, if your son isn't allergic to PB, how come he can't have PB? icon_confused.gif
post #40 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by darcat

I dont get this at all. Why the heck are we having a peanut allergy epidemic? icon_eek.gif I never heard anything like it in my life.



I agree with you. I never knew anyone that had any food allergies while I was growing up. It's like they all appeared over night. I do realize the dangers to someone that has one, but come on, I wonder how many of them are real allergies, and how many of them arent.
"Let your legacy not be the stupid forgettable dandruff of life but that you LIVED. That you were here and that people remember YOU in all your wonderfulness. Not your stuff. Because stuff is forgettable." - - Jackie (a blog writer from Canada)
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"Let your legacy not be the stupid forgettable dandruff of life but that you LIVED. That you were here and that people remember YOU in all your wonderfulness. Not your stuff. Because stuff is forgettable." - - Jackie (a blog writer from Canada)
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post #41 of 118
When I was a kid my mother would send a wrapped book for the library now while I was embarassed because no one else did that it made an impression on me... she would write inside the front cover given to hawthorne school ( date) on Meg_____ _ birthday.... we moved away but when I was a teen I was visiting a friend and her little brother said WOW I just read a book at school and it had your name in it it was a really cool book about rocks!!!


we could bring treats but times change... the fancy pencils, erasers, are neat.. how about pencils that say happy birthday and the childs name.


now you have time to make a fancy birthday cake for home.
post #42 of 118
sorry to hear about all the schools that won't allow treats thumbsdown.gif i guess i should count myself very very lucky. when my son went from kindergarten to first grade the teachers were fighting over who would get my son so their class would get all the cakes and cupcakes!!!!!! i take at least one cake a month to his class and the teachers and students love it!!!! some teachers have asked me to give them a heads up so they can be sure to stop by the class on cake day! icon_rolleyes.gif so i have a great time trying out new cakes and then taking them to the school.
post #43 of 118
Oh I am so glad I found this post. I have about had it with our school district. Last year they started a wellness team. This group of people (who in my opinion have NOTHING to do but sit around and dream up dumb rules) decided that celebrations at the school should not be centered around food. Of course we have never been able to bring in home-baked goods but now we can have ZERO food brought in for any type of celebrations. Ok, um yeah lets celebrate Christmas without treats, and Halloween without candy, what next? No turkey on Thanksgiving? I so agree with many of you, I'm sorry if I offend one person by celebrating Christmas, but where the heck are my rights?

But here is the REAL kicker..the fundraiser this fall? Selling frozen cookie dough. Yep, can you believe how hypocritacal that is? I mean we cant send a cookie in their lunch box, but they want us to send our kids out to neighbors and family selling cookie dough? Then there is the school carnival, they sell cookies the size of frisbee, and king size candy bars. I guess it's ok when it benefits them, yes I'm steaming at this point....

My husband and I are petitioning the PTO this month to dismiss either the wellness policy or the fundraiser. Our daughter has been the top seller of cookie dough for the past three years because my hubby buys it for the restaurant, not this year. We arent selling one cookie!

So sad that we are taking so many traditions out of the school.
I do like the idea of a kids cookbook as the donation to the library, we sent in pencils this week for my daughter to give away for her birthday, which I guess was fine, but made me sad I couldnt send in treats..
Women are angels, you may clip our wings but we will still fly..on broomsticks..were flexible.
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Women are angels, you may clip our wings but we will still fly..on broomsticks..were flexible.
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post #44 of 118
Hi Guys,

Just wanted to speak up for the public schools and their employees a bit. Please understand that for the most part they are really good and caring people just trying to educate our kids. They have so much legislation to conform to and have to be so sensitive to avoid law suits that they have to come up with some crazy rules.
post #45 of 118
I wasn't allergic to anything until I was 32 years old and almost died from an out-of-the-blue allergy to eggs. So, it isn't just the kids who are getting allergies like this. I'm extremely fortunate in that I am not super-sensitive to trace amounts. Some people are so allergic to a specific food that they should not even smell it cooking.

My daughter, a few years before me, developed a life-threatening allergy to green peas and lentils. Go figure! She's now 21 and we think she may have outgrown the allergy, but don't really want to find out. We were fortunate in that our pediatrician knew the top child food allergist in the country, and our daughter was able to get a full work up and evaluation with him. He said that in her case, it was very likely she would completely outgrow her allergy (from her bloodwork and history), and to bring her back in 5 years. He moved and we didn't.

But, these allergies are not the figment of the imagination of overly protective moms, although I'm sure there are some out there. Let me tell you, I went through six scares before we figured out my allergy (I don't react in a "normal" allergy pathway for study), and it is not something you fool around with at all, any more than you would give someone a pool of water to stand it and tell them to stick a metal coathanger in an electrical socket. I absolutely positively HATE being any trouble to anyone because of my allergy, but I cannot under any circumstances take a chance that I'll have a reaction. That would be a horrible thing to do to the person offering me food. Likewise, my daughter has just learned to say, "No thank you" without making a big deal of her allergy.

She had forgotten how awful a reaction could be until this summer. She spent some time in China and on her flight home, someone came and got her and asked if she had an Epipen. Someone else was having a reaction and had packed hers in her checked luggage. When she saw the girl having the reaction, she was scared to death and SO thankful she had her epipen to share and that it worked!

It is sad that we can't just serve what we want, send to school what we grew up with, etc. But it is much, much, MUCH harder on the child and their family than it is on us. I remember one year in my daughter's class was a boy with wheat allergy. His mom was always SOO glad that I got it and that I would call her when I was doing anything for the class (even including a piece of candy in a Valentine) to find out EXACTLY what he could have.
"To laugh often and to love much..., to appreciate beauty, to find the best in others, to give one's self..., this is to have succeeded."
Ralph Waldo Emerson
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"To laugh often and to love much..., to appreciate beauty, to find the best in others, to give one's self..., this is to have succeeded."
Ralph Waldo Emerson
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