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darn school! - Page 8

post #106 of 118
I work in a public school district as well, and my daughter started school last year. My high school students bring in homemade baked goods all the time, but district policy is "store bought only." I was disappointed until I saw how some of my daughter's classmates were coming to school. I thought to myself, "Man, if that's how they send their kids to school, I wonder what the house must look like?" Not to mention the can of worms food allergies (peanuts, dairy, wheat, etc.) can open up for which the school can be held liable. So, while the policy is a bummer, I can understand it.

AND, when her class was doing a study on bears, I checked with the main office about sending in a panda cake and was told that they'd be thrilled if I did so. So...sometimes there are loopholes. icon_smile.gif
post #107 of 118
I think the school has your child in mind. Yes, they have gone overboard. Our school doesn't allow any sugar in the school for health reasons. Alot of the states are adapting the Nutrition law in schools.
Obesity is on the rise so instead of letting the parents deal with thier childrens eating habits, they put it on every child. I'm o.k. with the occasional snack at school and teachers rewarding with a piece of candy. I do watch what my kids eat and limit candy, sweets, and no sodas at home. I don't go overboard and deny all sweets.
With the nutrition law being so strict I wonder why my kids always bring home PTA sales to sell cookies and candy.
post #108 of 118
We cannot do class treats, but are allowed to do bake sale for the PTA.
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post #109 of 118
Oh, And there was the parent who made brownies and used the same spoon she cooked meth with to make the brownies........ I read the story in the paper If I remember correctly.
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post #110 of 118
I hope this may be a constructive suggestion and taken in that vein.

If you disagree with the policy, why not take a batch of cupcakes to the next meeting of your school district's board. (Please adjust the terminology to whatever governing body presides over your particular school, county, state, or country. I'll just try my best with what I know.)

While you're there, talk to them about your concerns. The board members represent you. Voter turn out is usually quite low for school board elections. Board members have good reason to be attentive to issues raise by their constituents. Talk to your friends and neighbors and get them to agree to vote for pro-cupcake candidates. That probably sound flippant, but I'm serious. Elections at this level have hinged on issues like scrunchies for the cheerleaders.

I urge you to be respectful. Most board members are good people who really want to do the best for the kiddos. Pull up your districts website and check out who they are before you go. I think you'll find that most are truly well-intentioned, fine people. (Yes, you'll find a few with questionable motivations, but wouldn't that be a great thing to know come next election?)

And also, be prepared. Maybe Google your state and county regulations governing this issue. Try your departments of health, agriculture, and education. No, they are not real page turners, but you can make fondantyou can figure out how to engineer a wedding cakeyou can do this.

Understand that there really might be some reasons not to have cupcakes in the classroom. Childhood obesity is an extremely hot button topic right now. As you can tell, there are other people who feel strongly about allergies. (On a personal note, I just like to make quick mention of the diabetic kids.)

It'd be a real positive thing to model for your kids. Show them that you don't always have to agree with the law. Show them that there are appropriate avenues to take to try to change things that just don't seem right. Show them that there are steps you can take you don't have to feel oppressed by some nebulous "them."

I stand firm with my statement that most people involved in schools, public and private, really DO care about the kiddoes.
post #111 of 118
The greatest lesson a friend with diabetes taught me, and mind you, he's a skinny guy and used to weigh 200+... Diabetics still need SUGAR in their diets in order to stay healthy. It's when they don't have enough sugar that they can be in just as much, if not more trouble than if they have too much. A spaghetti dinner is going to mess with their sugar levels more than a cupcake will because it's just a higher glycemic index and a greater amount. And, again, the issue is moderation.
post #112 of 118
I really hope all these "loopholes" some of you keep finding don't end up hurting someone else's child. Rules are put in place for a reason- not just to fill up paper.
post #113 of 118
The question is, why is the system set up such that they need rules like this when if the school system, teachers, and parents were working together on solutions to the problems involved (obesity, food safety, allergies, etc.) like the rest of the world does. Things like if you bake with peanuts at home, do not use those pans or that sink if you're making treats for this class... Or how to sterilize pans before using them. Or o.k. recipes and substitutions... Educate the parents through the kids.

No one is saying that if a child has a peanut allergy in their kid's class that they bring Reeses Pieces and peanut butter cups as their kid's treat. OTOH, you can only protect kids to a certain extent and at some point it becomes detrimental to their education of dealing with life. Hence, why we've got another rise going on in suicide rates among teens. It ain't because they aren't getting drugged enough with antidepressants, it's because they aren't learning how to deal with LIFE. Instead of teaching kids how to handle life, they're being protected to the point of detriment. Physical education wasn't eliminated because it served a purpose to teach kids about being physically active and eating right, it's because everyone that HATED it that is now in power and federal mandates about math and science (teach the math, how many is three sets of 10 reps and physics of motion in an applied setting). Maybe the problem was the old model of group sports instead of an individual sports focus for the kids that didnt' excel in team sports. Or around here, there is such a focus on making the varsity team from a field of 1000 that kids get discouraged and forget that not everyone is going to make the pro's, the point of the sport is to have fun.

No one malitiously gives their kid a PBJ sandwich for breakfast if there is a kid in the class with a PB allergy. It's when it's a choice between a PBJ sandwich for breakfast when that's the only item of food left in the house does the child get breakfast or not. The point is, there's no way to know if the gal working at the grocery store just ate her PBJ sandwich for lunch without washing her hands before returning to the checkout the food of the person who is making a delicious salad for her child to take to school that the kid with the allergy is going to take a bite of. That's also why I think that grocery stores with baggers need to have a hand-washing sink located near the checkout and also be required to wash their hands frequently (and possibly wear gloves) just like the rest of us in the food industry. Life is going to happen it's ultimately up to the person with the allergy to take responsibility for themselves and how they are going to live regardless of if they're 5 or 95.
post #114 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by CoutureCake

The greatest lesson a friend with diabetes taught me, and mind you, he's a skinny guy and used to weigh 200+... Diabetics still need SUGAR in their diets in order to stay healthy. It's when they don't have enough sugar that they can be in just as much, if not more trouble than if they have too much. A spaghetti dinner is going to mess with their sugar levels more than a cupcake will because it's just a higher glycemic index and a greater amount. And, again, the issue is moderation.



Hi, I am diabetic and have been for many years.

No a cupcake won't kill me, but it can throw my blood sugar level off if I don't plan for it.

The glycemic index is very complex. Turnips are actually have a higher number than peanut m&m's. Go figure.

I'm a little older that school aged...okay alot...but I still have trouble being mature enough to say no the the treats offered at work.

(By the way, I consider cake decorating an extreme sport.)
post #115 of 118
my little one started school too! I anticipated the snack restrictions, so i made some sugar cookies for the staff the first day!!!
post #116 of 118
My daughters last month almost died from an allergic reaction to sunblock!
(ages 7 and almost 4) It broke my heart. I'm the one that almost killed my children by trying to protect them. I won't go into the horrid details but the doctors said it's a miracle that they didn't die.
I can't imagine being a parent with a prominat food allergy and dealing with this scare daily. My oldest has a food allergy to kiwi but that's not such a hard one to deal with.

I understand why the schools block homemade treats and as much as I love to bake I agree with them. Not everyone is clean and responsible. Most cooks are not unfortunatly. I'm paranoid of other peoples food (especially if I don't know them)

The allergy specialist told me last week that only 8% of people are allergic to nuts. The majority of people who think they are have never been tested. I still think 8% is kind of high though.
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post #117 of 118
Yeah I have heard that a lot lately. My BF's son just started school & she was so upset (his bday is next week). I told her that maybe she can make them, bag them & hand them out as they were going home. That way the parents can decide whether the kids can have them.
We live in a different district & all year last year I made them for every holiday. Never heard anything from my 3 kids teachers other than MMMMMMM; so far I haven't been told I can't. My son's bday is next month. I will make them, send them & if I get told not to do it again then I guess I will have a lot more free time on my hands come the holidays.

I do see the reasoning behind it (my nephew is deathly allergic to nuts) but come on way to kill a bday celebration.

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post #118 of 118
I thought I'd throw my hat into this ring...

15 yrs ago, when my DS was in Kindergarten, they could have snacks. Parents volunteered for the "letter" snack if they wished -- whatever letter they were learning for the week. I brought in daily snacks for each letter I signed up for letter "P": pink pigs (very small cookies), pieces of pizza, popcorn, purple penguins, pomegranites. Kids loved them. And I got great pictures of my kid's classmates at the time!!

I even brought in 'black bats' at Halloween time. Made with purple/grape jello-jigglers & cut out with my cookie cutters. Kids loved them cuz they were different, teachers loved them because they WERE NOT yet more cupcakes, and I had a blast making them.

And years ago, we could handout homemade treats to the trick-or-treaters, too.

Yes, times have changed!
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