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using high density roller to smooth - Page 2

post #16 of 89
gpenguin, sorry you got so offended by Doug's post, but you have to admit that your original post was pretty generic. You never stated your background or any real "data" as to why these rollers may or may not be harmful.

I don't know if you ever decorate cakes or not, but these rollers are a such a time saver on cakes and, in my opinion, do the best job. You have to understand that most of us would really question and argue with your original, generic sounding post when you were stating that the tool that many of us rely on the most is not safe.
post #17 of 89
ooooh..not to hurt anyone's feelings here or anything, but I'm so tired of hearing how doing this is bad, and doing that is bad for your health. My grandmother is 89 years old, she ate vegetables straight out of the ground, opened caned food without washing the lid, licked the back of envelopes (ect., etct.) and she is just fine!

I'll never give up my foam roller! Melvira is my hero!!
Women are angels, you may clip our wings but we will still fly..on broomsticks..were flexible.
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Women are angels, you may clip our wings but we will still fly..on broomsticks..were flexible.
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post #18 of 89
Quote:
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This will teach me to bother letting others try to make a more informed decision.



I want to THANK you for giving me this information. I was thinking about using this method and now I will not. So you posting helped me make the decision that I think is best for me. icon_smile.gif
I completely understand your feelings.
Susie
post #19 of 89
This is very interesting, and I am not surprised about the chemical results. I often wonder about many things I use in the kitchen. I can say that my rollers are washed and dried (soap & water) after each use. When I use them, they are slightly damp to avoid picking up any icing that may not have dried enough. Am I taking a chance using this, probably. But my skills are so limited and it is a very useful tool. I often wonder about the use of plastic wraps, silicone coated parchment paper, things like that; but there are so many bad things out there, one could go crazy with worry.

Please note, I do appreciate the time and effort into your research; was alot of very good information.

Now, for someone in the cake decorating business to devise a tool we can use that would be considered "food safe".

Deb
mom to Christine, John, Michele, Joseph & Peter......grandma to Zachary and Colette
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mom to Christine, John, Michele, Joseph & Peter......grandma to Zachary and Colette
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post #20 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by lchristi27

ooooh..not to hurt anyone's feelings here or anything, but I'm so tired of hearing how doing this is bad, and doing that is bad for your health. My grandmother is 89 years old, she ate vegetables straight out of the ground, opened caned food without washing the lid, licked the back of envelopes (ect., etct.) and she is just fine!

I'll never give up my foam roller! Melvira is my hero!!



I so agree! Like another poster on this thread, I am also ServSafe certified (although I took a 4 month long, intense course on it) and I think that there are things that are much worse than a clean roller (I do clean mine after every use) that has spent not more than a few seconds on a cake.

Melvira is also my hero, and no, I'm not giving up my roller, either.
post #21 of 89
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpaigew

gpenguin, sorry you got so offended by Doug's post, but you have to admit that your original post was pretty generic. You never stated your background or any real "data" as to why these rollers may or may not be harmful.



Actually in my original post I did say I was a part time cake decorator and a chemist.
post #22 of 89
I was the one who asked her to post here. I also belong to the Wilton forums and when she first came to us saying she was a chemist and was wondering how safe these rollers were, I was all ears. She told us she would have her husband do some tests and when the results were in I ASKED her to come here and post them thinking people would be as concerned as I was.
I know there are so many crazy emails, posts, etc that aren't true and are just 'the sky is falling', but this to me was a legitimate concern seeing as these rollers were not made for food while frying pans, spatulas, paper towels, plastic wrap, etc are specifically MADE to come in contact with food.
Sorry gpenguin *shrug*, I didn't think you were going to get this kind of response.
'A waste of time' is a good example of the theory of relativity. 4 hours spent on decorating a cake is a long time, 'a waste of time', to some, but to the decorator those hours seem like minutes because they're doing something they love.
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'A waste of time' is a good example of the theory of relativity. 4 hours spent on decorating a cake is a long time, 'a waste of time', to some, but to the decorator those hours seem like minutes because they're doing something they love.
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post #23 of 89
gpenguin ~ I always wash my roller in hot water with Dawn dishwashing liquid. I then let it airdry. The soap rinses out of the sponges very easily. I even wash every roller in the same manner when I remove it from the package. I'm wondering if washing them in this manner will lessen or rid the amount of the chemical?

As far as you saying
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This will teach me to bother letting others try to make a more informed decision

I say please don't let this hinder you. It's better for you to let info like this be known that to let it go and regret it later.

I've been using the roller since long before Melvira mentioned it on CC. Only my family knew about it 'cause I hoped to marked one designated for food one day (although in reality it costs tons of money to do that icon_twisted.gif ). Maybe someone out there has the financial background to do it.

CC is a wonderful community of people who share ideas and information and help each other out. All you can do is put the information out there and then it's up to everyone else to make their choice.

I wonder about the sponges that Wilton sells for gumpaste use. Would they also leach the same chemical?
I can live without most things. But Cake Central......I can NOT
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I can live without most things. But Cake Central......I can NOT
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post #24 of 89
I appreciate the info provided concerning the rollers and the possibility of chemicals leaching in to the icings. I wondered about a "paint" roller to begin with... I am sure the method is great. Perhaps it is time for a food grade roller to smooth the icing. Someone get on that!!! Anyhow, my reason for being grateful for the info is... my future daughter in law has a butt load of things that will set off a reaction in her body. I would be hesitant to use the roller for that reason. If she (a pretty normal girl in all other respects) can have reactions to no see ems... why couldn't someone else??? Anyhow, thank you for the info...

As for the "sky is falling"... yep, I have seen enough of that too... and I have to say I tire of that as well... in this case... I feel like... I am licensed and I have a responsibility to ensure that my clients are getting cakes made in as clean and non-toxic environment as possible (perhaps my perspective is a bit tweeked because of my FDIL but, I guess that is what it is). With this info... I do not see how I could use this process...
post #25 of 89
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steady2Hands

gpenguin ~ I always wash my roller in hot water with Dawn dishwashing liquid. I then let it airdry. The soap rinses out of the sponges very easily. I even wash every roller in the same manner when I remove it from the package. I'm wondering if washing them in this manner will lessen or rid the amount of the chemical?


He told me there was less of the chemical in the water, but not much less. The chemical is hydrophobic so it doesn't dissolve into water as easily as it would oils, which is why he tested with both. I'm not sure how much washing would help. It is more of a time release kind of thing so the chemical is always going to be there. I was much more concerend with the amount in the oil since icing is oil based.

Quote:
Quote:


I wonder about the sponges that Wilton sells for gumpaste use. Would they also leach the same chemical?


If they are selling them for food products, they have already gone through the testing.
post #26 of 89
gpenquin, I for one am thankful you posted regarding the high-density roller chemical findings. To be informed is good and to be wise about what surrounds us is just good smart common sense.
In the future If you have further information to share regarding this subject please do post it on this thread for those of us who are interested in knowing more about it and in the meantime I will try to do some research of my own. My husband has been in manufacturing for over 30 years now and has a tremendous amount of access to chemicals information of all kinds.

Please do not be offended by any challenging reply post to your subject and for pete's sake do not let it stop you from enjoying CC in every possible way! I personally think your post has sparked a tremendous amount of attention and interest and has been well received by most. Everyone has their own opinion about things and it is viewing both sides of an issue that we can come to a good and smart informed decision for our own personal self. I for one take factual info very seriously!

THANKS SO MUCH FOR YOU AND YOUR HUSBAND SHARING YOUR DEGREED KNOWLEDGE!! icon_smile.gif
Lea
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Lea
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post #27 of 89
Thank you so much gpenguin for taking the time to share the results of the test with everyone here on CC. I am very grateful to you. I read how wonderful the roller works and I must admit I have been tempted to try it but I was afraid because it's not classified as "food safe". By the way, welcome to CC......
Margie
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Margie
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post #28 of 89
I am glad that we have a forum where things can be discussed, even though things get a little heated icon_mad.gif sometimes.
I am grateful to both Doug and gpenguin for their insights, facts and opinions.
I have been using the paper towel method for 26 years and I have mental visions of me trying to learn how to roll a roller over a cake surface thumbsdown.gif lol, I'm sure I wouldn't be able to use it after I threw it on the ground and stomped on it icon_rolleyes.gif
I hope everybody has a great cake day thumbs_up.gif
Jibbies
post #29 of 89
Thread Starter 
Thank you to all the positive comments I have received. I was just trying to share information and had no idea I would be attacked. I thought it would be a wonderful method for me to smooth my cakes. I was dissapointed in the results because I wanted to use the roller, but just couldn't until I knew for sure. I have two small children and I think of their safety before my own. I am actually starting to get pretty good at the Viva method and since paper towels were meant to come in contact with food, I don't mind using it.
post #30 of 89
I also use the Viva towel method for smoothing my cakes. I was actually even hesitant about using that in the beginning, so I wrote to Kimberly Clark and inquired about it's safety on using it in such a manner. I was told that if using the paper towels on food, to only use the plain white towels (unprinted). That's what I've done and I can get a cake perfectly smooth without any worry of using it. I would think that maybe the roller could be used on top of the Viva paper towel without a problem if anyone is hesitant about using the roller in direct contact with the icing.
Margie
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Margie
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