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Chocolate Ganache

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
I have a bride who is interested in chocolate ganache. I've never made it before so I have a few questions.

1. The recipe I have is just basically chocolate and heavy cream, is that correct?

2. Do you pour it onto the cake or do you spread it like you would with normal frosting?

3. Do you put a layer of buttercream on before the ganache?

Thanks for any help you can give! And I'll take any tips I can get as well. Thanks!
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post #2 of 10
1. yep, although you may find that you'd prefer to add an extract (i.e. vanilla) or liqueur. Some recipes call for an addition of some butter to add depth and richness.

2. depends on the look you want. If you want that literally poured-on glossy look, you pour it on. I've never done that; I prefer to let it cool (to room temperature, usually overnight) and then whip it and then it works just like regular icing. My snowman cake is iced with whipped ganache. It should not be cold!

3. Goes on by itself unless you have a specific reason to use bc under it (if poured), like I have seen some cakes with a bc underlayer and the poured ganache "dripping" down the sides. Certainly if you whip it, it IS the frosting.

Ganache does not need to be refrigerated which is an extra bonus. It's the same stuff they use inside of truffles...yumm.

Good luck, that stuff is tasssssssssssssssstttttttttyyyyyyyyyy.
post #3 of 10
You can also spread it without whipping. I make the ganache then let it come to room temp for about 1 hour 15 minutes. I use a metal spatula to spread it on.

This cake is done that way:

http://www.cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=22806

The piping on this cake also done with unwhipped ganache--I put it in the fridge for about an hour and a half after making it to bring it to stiff enough consistency for piping.

I love ChefTaz's ganache recipe from this site. I think it's called Ganache I. It also calls for butter, which keeps the ganache shiny even after refrigeration.
post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 
Holly, that cake is very pretty! I want to do it whichever way makes it still look shiny after it's on. Would that be poured or applied with a spatula?

I'm going to look that recipe up that you're talking about as well. I haven't been able to find one with butter in it as of yet.
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Accountant by day....Masked baker by night!
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post #5 of 10
I use Chef Tazs' recipe (it is in recipe section) It is very easy. I pour on cake and use spatula to smooth. Sometimes I pre ice with bc but most times not. I've used choco chips (but they don't melt all the way unless you stir them forever), reg. chocolate which is good, but my family prefers the taste of the candy choco melts.
post #6 of 10
When doing poured ganache I do put chocolate buttercream under the cake. My first reason is that the ganache will form to the surface, so if you don't have a smooth surface, like if you torted or have 2 layers, it will show.

My second reason is that ganache always seems to be a thin layer over the icing, and I like more than just a thin layer of icing.
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post #7 of 10
I have a recipe for ganache that's just chocolate and cream but I add about a tablespoon of butter to it... Comes out great everytime, and I think that helps it set up more shiny, too. And it keeps the shine after it's cooled and poured on the cake!
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"It's not the woman who dies with the most pairs of shoes who garners the prize; it's the one who has the most fun dancing in them"
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post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by RRGibson

Holly, that cake is very pretty! I want to do it whichever way makes it still look shiny after it's on. Would that be poured or applied with a spatula?

I'm going to look that recipe up that you're talking about as well. I haven't been able to find one with butter in it as of yet.



If you use a recipe with butter, you can pour or spread it and it will be shiny. On that particular cake, I used the spread method.

Also, spreading (especially after the ganache has cooled some) allows you to make a thicker layer of icing (and cover any small imperfections in the cake surface). I even do a crumb coat then a final coat just like I would with buttercream.
post #9 of 10
I am covering a 3 tier wedding cake this weekend in ganache. I think what i am going to do is use the spatula method first, in a light coat. Then do the pour method. Do you think that will work?
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Proud mommy to my three girls...
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post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thanks Holly! I think I'm more comfortable spreading it because I feel like it won't be as smooth if I pour it. Or that if I pour it, I'll still have to go back and spread in some areas.
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